Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

April 30th, 2007, 2:19 pm #61

Hi Roy,

I'm on a precedence path right now, taking all the critical issues first in order to get on the water. Once I water test this engine, or at any time after all the rest of the issues are resolved, then I'll stretch a sheet of 6-mil poly under the motor and just take the time to scrape everything off carefully with a screwdriver, with a shop vac, and I'll paint things up. Trust me, the motor will look as good as the transmission does!

I would have liked to just pressure wash the motor down, but since it was never out of the boat (it was sitting crossways on the main structure of the hull, see some of the prev photos) I decided I would not mess everything up inside the boat with the spray option. I've tried a few spots, and the caked on grime comes off pretty easily with a flat blade screwdriver.

This will be some of the mindless therapy I can do once this rig is ready to pull a water skiier

Regards, Paul
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

May 16th, 2007, 2:41 pm #62

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Check out this link if anyone wants a great looking prop shaft CNC machined like the one in the photo below!!!!!
http://www.deepblueyachtsupply.com/shaftguide.aspx

I called my friendly machine shop and my contact (the owner) is out of the office and nobody else can give me a price. I checked with DBYS and they have the handy dandy price listing on line for stainless steel shafting, they have a CNC machine in house, they do this all the time, and the shipping from FL to Nashville is ten bucks.

So I have a new stainless steel shaft on the way for my project boat.

Anyone out there need a shaft, check with these guys to check price. Their shipping cost can't be beaten, and it will take about a week for your shaft to appear at your doorstep.

Checking back to last year when I had two new shafts done for my 38 Commander, these prices are considerably better than I paid at my friendly cross-town machine shop. However, in fairness to them, I can't recall now what the cost of the raw ss stock was. In any case, it pays to shop around.

Regards, Paul


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
a few days later
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Look what just arrived in a cardboard shipping tube, complete with nuts and keys!

I appreciate fine machine work no matter what the occasion. Whether it is a fine vintage Heuer or Beretta shotgun, and yes even a prop shaft. This work (as I think you can see) is far beyond what I expected in a lowly underwater shaft.


The nut, locknut, keys and cotter key came with the shaft as a part of the price.



Even the forward end that mates up with the transmission hub is polished to an almost jewelry grade finish. AMAZING !



Below is what I would have normally expected to see. Both will work, and probably both will work equally fine, however I do admire the workmanship any time I encounter top quality work. These days it's in short supply too.


Regards, Paul

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Paul
Paul

May 16th, 2007, 2:52 pm #63

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Here's the starting point! Just horrible! I love the boat, but I hate that piece of masonite they put in your face, with the cheap vinyl fake wood!





Got my instruments back, more about that later when I can get some good photos.

Here is my solution to that horribly CHEAP looking fake wood vinyl on masonite that someone at the Corsair Division in Cortland New York, Thompson Boat Company of New York, Chris Craft, decided to use on this boat.

I'm using the old one as a template, and the new one will be solid mahogany. I have to inset the dials in order for things to fit right, but this also gives a better look at the wood, letting people know that it's real wood.

Yes, I know it's not authentic, and I can always make a crappy cheap piece of cardboard with vinyl on it if I'm going to a show where a judge may have a problem, lol!


Here is the template of the old, on top of the new one in progress.



Here is a test fit for one of the newly refurbished dials.


Here are a couple pics of the reveal, one with a flash, the other with natural light. The flash makes it look like I was out working at night!




I'll be a lot happier with the boat, if I don't have to look at a cheap piece of vinyl!


See more pics in the next thread


Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

May 16th, 2007, 2:59 pm #64

This gives an idea of how bad the original dash looked. I know this was early in the fiberglass production run at the Corsair Division, but sheesh, this is terrible.


Here is the dash now cut out of the planed mahogany board (left over from another boat project in the past). I'm going to ease the edges of the piece and fix it to the dash just like the other one. I may also add another panel below, perhaps on a hinge that can fold up out of the way, to mount my additional modern equipment such as digital depth gauge, sniffer, etc., all of which are small round dials. These are needed for modern boating, but I'd like to be able to fold them up out of the way if I go to a boat show with this boat, because the dials won't be looking as good as the nice chrome ring dials Dale Kocian restored for me.


Regards,
Paul

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Edit:
Added to this thread, for the record, here are the instruments that Dale Kocian restored for me.



Here are two 41 year old instruments, recently restored by Dale Kocian, of Kocian Instruments . These are from the Cortland, New York, Thompson/Chris Craft Corsair Division, circa 1966. They were installed as original equipment in my 1966 20 fiberglass Sea Skiff, and I suspect they were also installed in numerous other Lancer, Corsair, and Sea Skiff models, and potentially the 19 and 23 Commander as well. During the disassembly Dale discovered something odd, one bezel was brass, and the other one was steel. They looked identical and both looked good from the outside, however, steel rusts and the steel one came back from the re-chroming shop looking below Dales standard..

At the 2007 Mt. Dora Boat Show, Dale found me another brass bezel. In addition, he discovered the ammeter electronic movement was bad and he replaced it. All of this was done for the initial price quote.

I am a firm believer that instruments make a big impact when looking at a vintage boat. If the instruments look ratty, its hard for the rest of the boat to overcome this impression. If the instruments look perfect, some of the other faults on the boat may actually be overlooked! In any case, these instruments will be on proud display at many a boat show over the next foreseeable future, as we trailer our low production 1966 20 fiberglass Sea Skiff to ACBS events.

If you have a project that needs to have the instruments restored, Dale can make them look dead stock new. The backs are even painted in the original color, the 12V sticker is in place. Amazing!

Close-up photos are unforgiving. They show EVERYTHING. Take a look at these photos, they tell the story better than I can.













Dont be in a hurry to have instrument restoration work done. Take care of this on the off season, and dont wait too late to send your instruments in. Quality work takes time, and it cant be rushed.

Dale and Mrs. Kocian, photo taken at the Mt. Dora Boat Show, 2007.

If you subscribe to Classic Boating Magazine, you may have seen Dales advertisements. He can be reached at [url=mailto:dkocian@ccgauges.com]dkocian@ccgauges.com[/url]

Kocian Instruments
2341 Indy Court
De Pere, WI 54115
(920) 336-1591- Phone
920-336-1591 Fax
http://www.ccgauges.com

Check out the next post, to see what these gauges looked like when they were sent in (Warning, not for the squeemish, not a pretty sight !!)

Regards,

Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on September 11th, 2009, 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 4th, 2006, 10:39 pm

May 16th, 2007, 6:08 pm #65



Beautiful job ! I agree, it is pretty strange for CC to have used a dashboard design with such poor presentation. The Sea Skiff line was not a particularly expensive product, but they missed the boat on that one (pun intended).

Howard
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mike obrien
mike obrien

May 16th, 2007, 6:46 pm #66

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Paul
Paul

May 16th, 2007, 7:46 pm #67

I love my Skiff, but this one is a lot better condition. If anyone out there in cyberspace is considering buying this boat, you can contact me for just about EVERYTHIHNG on it. I can tell you which items are potmetal, which are brass, what brand the steering is, how thick the bottom is, I've been over every inch of the boat, literally.

Nice find, this one is a true sister to mine, obviously out of the same mold, and look at the price. Sheesh, that's a lot of rare boat for the price.

Paul
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Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

May 16th, 2007, 8:21 pm #68

This gives an idea of how bad the original dash looked. I know this was early in the fiberglass production run at the Corsair Division, but sheesh, this is terrible.


Here is the dash now cut out of the planed mahogany board (left over from another boat project in the past). I'm going to ease the edges of the piece and fix it to the dash just like the other one. I may also add another panel below, perhaps on a hinge that can fold up out of the way, to mount my additional modern equipment such as digital depth gauge, sniffer, etc., all of which are small round dials. These are needed for modern boating, but I'd like to be able to fold them up out of the way if I go to a boat show with this boat, because the dials won't be looking as good as the nice chrome ring dials Dale Kocian restored for me.


Regards,
Paul

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Edit:
Added to this thread, for the record, here are the instruments that Dale Kocian restored for me.



Here are two 41 year old instruments, recently restored by Dale Kocian, of Kocian Instruments . These are from the Cortland, New York, Thompson/Chris Craft Corsair Division, circa 1966. They were installed as original equipment in my 1966 20 fiberglass Sea Skiff, and I suspect they were also installed in numerous other Lancer, Corsair, and Sea Skiff models, and potentially the 19 and 23 Commander as well. During the disassembly Dale discovered something odd, one bezel was brass, and the other one was steel. They looked identical and both looked good from the outside, however, steel rusts and the steel one came back from the re-chroming shop looking below Dales standard..

At the 2007 Mt. Dora Boat Show, Dale found me another brass bezel. In addition, he discovered the ammeter electronic movement was bad and he replaced it. All of this was done for the initial price quote.

I am a firm believer that instruments make a big impact when looking at a vintage boat. If the instruments look ratty, its hard for the rest of the boat to overcome this impression. If the instruments look perfect, some of the other faults on the boat may actually be overlooked! In any case, these instruments will be on proud display at many a boat show over the next foreseeable future, as we trailer our low production 1966 20 fiberglass Sea Skiff to ACBS events.

If you have a project that needs to have the instruments restored, Dale can make them look dead stock new. The backs are even painted in the original color, the 12V sticker is in place. Amazing!

Close-up photos are unforgiving. They show EVERYTHING. Take a look at these photos, they tell the story better than I can.













Dont be in a hurry to have instrument restoration work done. Take care of this on the off season, and dont wait too late to send your instruments in. Quality work takes time, and it cant be rushed.

Dale and Mrs. Kocian, photo taken at the Mt. Dora Boat Show, 2007.

If you subscribe to Classic Boating Magazine, you may have seen Dales advertisements. He can be reached at [url=mailto:dkocian@ccgauges.com]dkocian@ccgauges.com[/url]

Kocian Instruments
2341 Indy Court
De Pere, WI 54115
(920) 336-1591- Phone
920-336-1591 Fax
http://www.ccgauges.com

Check out the next post, to see what these gauges looked like when they were sent in (Warning, not for the squeemish, not a pretty sight !!)

Regards,

Paul
Very simple, real wood, good looking, almost original look, but much nicer. Whats not to like about it?

Tom
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Rickard
Rickard

May 16th, 2007, 10:08 pm #69

This gives an idea of how bad the original dash looked. I know this was early in the fiberglass production run at the Corsair Division, but sheesh, this is terrible.


Here is the dash now cut out of the planed mahogany board (left over from another boat project in the past). I'm going to ease the edges of the piece and fix it to the dash just like the other one. I may also add another panel below, perhaps on a hinge that can fold up out of the way, to mount my additional modern equipment such as digital depth gauge, sniffer, etc., all of which are small round dials. These are needed for modern boating, but I'd like to be able to fold them up out of the way if I go to a boat show with this boat, because the dials won't be looking as good as the nice chrome ring dials Dale Kocian restored for me.


Regards,
Paul

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Edit:
Added to this thread, for the record, here are the instruments that Dale Kocian restored for me.



Here are two 41 year old instruments, recently restored by Dale Kocian, of Kocian Instruments . These are from the Cortland, New York, Thompson/Chris Craft Corsair Division, circa 1966. They were installed as original equipment in my 1966 20 fiberglass Sea Skiff, and I suspect they were also installed in numerous other Lancer, Corsair, and Sea Skiff models, and potentially the 19 and 23 Commander as well. During the disassembly Dale discovered something odd, one bezel was brass, and the other one was steel. They looked identical and both looked good from the outside, however, steel rusts and the steel one came back from the re-chroming shop looking below Dales standard..

At the 2007 Mt. Dora Boat Show, Dale found me another brass bezel. In addition, he discovered the ammeter electronic movement was bad and he replaced it. All of this was done for the initial price quote.

I am a firm believer that instruments make a big impact when looking at a vintage boat. If the instruments look ratty, its hard for the rest of the boat to overcome this impression. If the instruments look perfect, some of the other faults on the boat may actually be overlooked! In any case, these instruments will be on proud display at many a boat show over the next foreseeable future, as we trailer our low production 1966 20 fiberglass Sea Skiff to ACBS events.

If you have a project that needs to have the instruments restored, Dale can make them look dead stock new. The backs are even painted in the original color, the 12V sticker is in place. Amazing!

Close-up photos are unforgiving. They show EVERYTHING. Take a look at these photos, they tell the story better than I can.













Dont be in a hurry to have instrument restoration work done. Take care of this on the off season, and dont wait too late to send your instruments in. Quality work takes time, and it cant be rushed.

Dale and Mrs. Kocian, photo taken at the Mt. Dora Boat Show, 2007.

If you subscribe to Classic Boating Magazine, you may have seen Dales advertisements. He can be reached at [url=mailto:dkocian@ccgauges.com]dkocian@ccgauges.com[/url]

Kocian Instruments
2341 Indy Court
De Pere, WI 54115
(920) 336-1591- Phone
920-336-1591 Fax
http://www.ccgauges.com

Check out the next post, to see what these gauges looked like when they were sent in (Warning, not for the squeemish, not a pretty sight !!)

Regards,

Paul
Looking good Paul, very nioe work!
Looking forward to see some more photos of the boat now that you have started to put everything together.

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

May 16th, 2007, 10:56 pm #70

I'm looking forward to seeing the photos too, ha!

Believe me, I've enjoyed the project tremendously and the boat is going to get lots of action, but I'm ready to start playing and just about ready to stop working!

Stay tuned ! In the next couple of weeks there will be a huge amount of work coming together. I am going to get lots of photos of this one on the water too.

With gas prices hitting records here in the US, smaller boats make a lot of sense. We’ll run the 38 Commander over a couple 50 or 75 mile runs this season, but the Skiff is going to be getting the water skiing and breakfast runs! There is a place on Old Hickory, Gallatin Marina, that serves great breakfasts. Arriving by boat is the only way to go! If any of my local buddies are reading this from central Tennessee, Gallatin Marina is no secret!

Regards, thanks for the encouragement,

Paul
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