Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

January 16th, 2007, 5:25 pm #21

Interesting series of photos, Paul, and I'm surprised to see how that dashboard was made. Just a piece of masonite with vinyl? That metal trim really doesn't do a whole lot for me, but it does finish out the edge of the piece. I wonder what manufacturing genius (and accountant) figured that one out? It's obviously a low cost installation on a utility model. I'm sure your upgrade will look a lot better. How do you plan on finising it, and how are you going to treat the edges?

Tom
Quote
Share

Paul
Paul

January 16th, 2007, 6:36 pm #22

Hi Tom,

I agree, this is one cheap looking piece of vinyl coated masonite. Years ago I fabricated a TVR 2500-M (sports car) dashboard out of walnut, and I recessed the dials, took a huge amount of time, and the result was in the "Barrett Jackason" category. It made everything else look bad. I think I can do a somewhat similar job on this piece, by using a solid piece of mahogany, and gently recessing things to make it look more than just a plank of wood with dials in it. I understand it's not original, but in this case the original doesn't do anything for me, and if someone in the future wanted to redo it with masonite, I suppose it would be possible to do that.

There are a few other pieces of exposed mahogany on this boat. Not many, but enough to see and appreciate. I'll finish all of the pieces the same color, and this dash piece will get a polyurethane top coating to protect against scratching. With new dials it should really get some attention at the docks.

Regards, Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on January 16th, 2007, 6:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

January 16th, 2007, 8:58 pm #23

The trim tab controls and the Ivalite controls look like they were added after the fact, which I'm sure they were. Any plans for that?

Tom
Quote
Share

Paul
Paul

January 17th, 2007, 7:21 pm #24

Hi Tom,

I am planning on a complimentary wood panel below the dash in place of those obvious add on devices. It will be very carefully done in order to "look" original, and not detract from the vintage nature of the boat.

I've been looking into Forstner and Bormax bits lately!

Regards, Paul
Quote
Share

Paul
Paul

January 28th, 2007, 10:53 pm #25

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






This is the front air scoop on the 1966 20' fiberglass Sea Skiff. As you can see, it's cast into the boat and it's not the traditional clamshell air scoop. Clamshells are on the back of the boat in a traditional manner, but these things are just a bit strange. I think this design was changed later on when the same basic hull was sold as the Corsair Sea-V, as I've seen photos that show a front clamshell in this location, with a slightly modified top deck.







In any case, they're off to the rechroming shop.






Looking at the image received from the Mariners Museum, shows the clamshells instead of this cast in vent. I like the clamshells, myself, but since the boat has the cast in fiberglass vent device, naturally thats the way it will be.







Regards,
Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on January 29th, 2007, 1:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

January 29th, 2007, 1:29 am #26

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Here's what the boat came with. Note those front seats are actually hollow plywood boxes that are padded with foam and covered with vinyl.


We looked at some Garelick and Todd helm seats, and I found some that are not advertized much, that would work just fine. However, upon thinking this through, we decided to stay with the original configuration and potentially pay more to keep it original. The seat structure is still solid, and it weighs a ton. They do look cool, and there's nothing else on the water like them. Therefore it's originality over convenience!





The helm seat is smaller than the front passenger seat, and it is pulled back a bit. Strange but very cool.



Back seat is a bench that extends all the way across the back. Pretty simple and it should be easy to recover (with new foam).




Here is that traditional Commander style seat hardware many of us have on our older boats. It's strong, but it's tough on vinyl. I'm asking our guy to put in a double gusset here to prolong the life of the new istallation.


Since all the side panels are flat, I'm doing the recover there with an electric staple gun. The vinyl color of the seats is white, and all of the side panels is an off white "sand" color.

Regards, Paul




Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

February 3rd, 2007, 8:19 am #27

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






The temporary cocoon we built hastily this fall, is proving to be quite valuable. Since we didn't really plan on buying the boat, and it sort of fell into place, we didn't have a place to properly store it on the short term (that will be taken care of this next season with a proper structure ~ new boat shop and storage facility here on the ranch !) My work shop presently has a 1974 TVR 2500M and a 1956 17' speedboat. My two barns are full of mower decks and an old Bronco awaiting some TLC. Therefore we put up a quick and efficient cocoon to get us thorugh the wet and cold season. This structure (if you can call it that) will be dismantled in the very near future (we're already tired of looking at it, but we sure like the shelter it provides). I don't think one drop of water has gotten in, everything seems to drain nicely, and I have it anchored down to the lifting rings with straps, lol, to keep it from blowing away!

This is what it looked like Friday morning on my way to work.


I have an electric radiator heater inside, and when the sun is out the combination is really very comfortable. It has allowed us to work on the boat at any time we want to, and this will thankfully allow us to get her in the water in the springtime.

Here are a couple of views from under the covers, before work began. Right now the boat looks like a bomb hit, all apart, and there are pieces and parts all over the country being chromed, etc. I'm anxiously awaiting the restored instruments !





Weather permitting, I can work at night too. Since most of the work is localized inside the hull, things seem to work well. Stay tuned !

Regards, Paul
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 30th, 2006, 1:23 am

February 5th, 2007, 3:00 am #28

Hey Paul, I hope the phillips head screw on the mounting flange of the trim tap cylinder has an 1/8 of a turn left. It would be unsightly if all the screws didn't line up correctlly. ha, ha , ha just kiddin ya. Keep up the great work and Merry Christmas.

Chris Wade
'Fraid the man has a point.
Unless each & every single CC Reed & Prince (aka Frearson) screw on the entire craft is aligned perfectly (with only a R&P screwdrive:http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=131780), your boat will tend to veer in one direction or another until the situation is remedied.
Sorry about that!
: )
PS - Read about ur favorite "screw" type here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screw
http://www.sizes.com/tools/screw_drive.htm
http://www.irtools.com/IS/product_models.asp-en-8840
http://www.mountainlumber.com/histories ... ince.shtml
PSS - Be sure to choose the correct weapon (driver):http://www.newmantools.com/wfmc.htm
http://forums.pcworld.co.nz/archive/ind ... 62392.html
PSS - And ammo:
http://www.reedandprincemfg.com/
http://www.narragansettscrew.com/
http://www.oemfasteners.net/My_Homepage ... Page8.html
PSSS - Give up? See here:
<img src="http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?http://www.network54.com/Realm/tmp/1170644345.JPG">
Quote
Like
Share

Paul
Paul

February 11th, 2007, 12:02 am #29

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






This structure is supported directly off hollow fiberglass box beams and it really does not span much of a length. It was, however, broken at each side where there was an obvious flaw in design. The years took their toll, and sooner or later each side developed a crack in it.



I disassembled each bad piece, used it as a pattern for some new white oak which was used as a replacement to the cracked mahogany. I then doubled up the mid span sections because I didn't want a spring in the floor, and also because some of my buddies are big guys.



Plywood is screwed directly down to this structure and none of it is exposed in the boat. Janet painted it with the bilge gray paint to be sure it had a good layer of protection for the future. I'll bed it in with a healthy gob of 5200 and use some stainless steel screws to be sure it stays put.

As I proceed with the work, if I see anything that looks like it might rattle, I secure it with 5200, such as the flimsy fiberglass air ducts that surely would have rattled against the hull had I not done so.

Yes, I know, I need to work on my wardrobe !

Regards, Paul

A cool but pretty day in Central Tennessee
Last edited by FEfinaticP on February 11th, 2007, 1:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joined: January 4th, 2006, 10:39 pm

February 12th, 2007, 3:36 pm #30

If I'm not mistaken, you are holding the floor structure in front of the two front seats, where your feet rest. I see the shape which looks like it is conforming to the front profile of the hull.



Let me know if I'm wrong. I couldn't figure out the first photo, but this one looks like you are holding it in the same orientation as it will be installed in the boat.

Howard
Quote
Like
Share