Paul
Paul

September 17th, 2007, 12:21 am #121

After our run on the river we came back for another pass at the marina and we pulled up to the party dock. Alan Jackson had a few guys working on his spectacular new 1959 Rybovitch (more on THAT later !!)and they turned their heads and watched as we burbled by. Not only did they LOOK, they looked twice, lol. They are pretty boat savvy, being tasked with maintaing some of the finest vintage boats in the country. Later when one of the guys came over to look and chat a while, he said "we heard you coming, and we thought it must be Alan". Yes, this boat sounds great !!







Fun on the water Tennessee style ! I wish we got this boat on the water earlier, but in reality, we would not have used it in the 108-degree sweltering heat of the summer. It is amazing, just after September 1, it was like turning a big switch, and the weather suddenly became quite beautiful again. We got a little rain, and today I couldn't have asked for a prettier day. Thankfully, our season is long, so we'll be running this boat a lot until it freezes!

Regards,

Paul
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Dave Mehl
Dave Mehl

September 17th, 2007, 12:56 am #122

Wow what a happy day today is ! Yesterday I took my time, not really knowing if we would go to the water or not. As it turned out, I worked and worked on various things, and it got late in the day and we decided to try for Sunday.

Rather than getting up at the crack of dawn, as we planned, we slept in and enjoyed the Sunday morning, and we eventually got to the marina around noon.

We launched the boat and pulled it around to the gas dock. We gassed up before arriving at the marina. There I noticed we were taking on water so I tightened the shaft log and rudder log accordingly. Everything looked secure, we didn't see any fuel leaks, the water intrusion was stopped, and the bilge pump made quick work of the evacuation.

Since this was the first time any fuel had gone into the filter or into the new fuel lines, I knew I would have to crank the motor a lot in order to get it started. This was the case.

Finally, with a little encouragement from a can of starter fluid, things came to life and it pumped enough fuel to light up and continue running. It coughed and smoked down the fuel dock, ha ha, and burn off some of that carbon and oil I used to lube things up with.

After that, the motor ran reasonably well, especially due to the fact that is has NOT BEEN TUNED at all. I have a wrong carb off a 1959 283 Chris Craft, and have not timed the boat, nor have I even put in new plugs or set the points. I knew it would run, so I decided to test it as it was. Don't ask why, lol. I just wanted to test things at the marina to see if the transmission was pumping fluid, etc., because it was an unknown ebay acquisition, and I was worried about it. It works fine by the way, but it took a little linkage adjustment to get it to shift on demand.

So we fired it up at the docks, and it drew a crowd. Everyone seemed to be appreciative. The sound of the motor was spectacular. Numerous people started recalling their earlier days when they were kids, on Chris Craft boats, etc., and it's part of the fun having an old boat because it always invokes memories like this.

I took a pyrometer to everything, and true to form when we first did the test run on the garden hose, eveything was perfectly cool. I attribute this to the fact that I serviced the pump and those pressure regulator valves.

Then it came time to depart the dock and see what happened. This was a nerve wracking event. Off I went on a short excursion around the marina, Janet watched from the dock. At first I got NO RESPONSE FROM THE HELM. I couldn't figure it out, nothing seemed to be working. Guess what? The darn rack and pinion was turing the wrong way, ha ha ha. When I turned to the left, the boat wanted to go to the right. It was nuts. I ended up putting my hand on the bottom of the wheel, and if I wanted to go left, I would move my hand left (which is actually turning the wheel to the right). How this happened is beyond me, I guess it was too much beer during the steering installation time. I do recall looking over the transom seeing the rudder working, but never put it together. It will be an easy fix, however.

That didn't keep us from going out for a speed run. Of course, we did a lap around the marina and the idle adjustment was a bit high, and the harbormaster asked me to SLOW DOWN due to the wake, sheesh, a guy just can't have fun any more. He's a great guy, by the way, no problem there.

We went out the channel, depth sounder working perfectly, bilge pump working when needed (after getting the mud dabber work cleared out of the outlet). Giving it a bit of throttle, it was very apparent this boat has PLENTY OF POWER. It picked up and ran great. Steering was a challenge, ha ha. We turned back into our own wake and ran hard, the boat ran through that like it wasn't even there.

All said and done, we're thrilled. Now it is a matter of attending to details, doing a little tuning, swapping out the prop, and of course tending to that steering.

I'll be posting photos within the hour, stay tuned !

Regards,

Paul
I have followed this thread with interest, looking at all the work you have done. I have not been able to appreciate the true lines of this boat until seeing it on the water. Now I can see why you took to it like you did.

Congratulations on sticking to it and doing a spectacular job. That dashboard design and finish is outa-this-world. Very well done.

Dave
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Joined: May 4th, 2007, 3:52 pm

September 17th, 2007, 1:59 am #123

I suspect that there have been hundreds (maybe thousands) of folks on at least three continents who have been waiting for this day to arrive. I boldly speak for all when I say CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!
(It’s about time!!)


David W. Hoover
Gaithersburg, MD
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Roy
Roy

September 17th, 2007, 2:09 am #124

Wow what a happy day today is ! Yesterday I took my time, not really knowing if we would go to the water or not. As it turned out, I worked and worked on various things, and it got late in the day and we decided to try for Sunday.

Rather than getting up at the crack of dawn, as we planned, we slept in and enjoyed the Sunday morning, and we eventually got to the marina around noon.

We launched the boat and pulled it around to the gas dock. We gassed up before arriving at the marina. There I noticed we were taking on water so I tightened the shaft log and rudder log accordingly. Everything looked secure, we didn't see any fuel leaks, the water intrusion was stopped, and the bilge pump made quick work of the evacuation.

Since this was the first time any fuel had gone into the filter or into the new fuel lines, I knew I would have to crank the motor a lot in order to get it started. This was the case.

Finally, with a little encouragement from a can of starter fluid, things came to life and it pumped enough fuel to light up and continue running. It coughed and smoked down the fuel dock, ha ha, and burn off some of that carbon and oil I used to lube things up with.

After that, the motor ran reasonably well, especially due to the fact that is has NOT BEEN TUNED at all. I have a wrong carb off a 1959 283 Chris Craft, and have not timed the boat, nor have I even put in new plugs or set the points. I knew it would run, so I decided to test it as it was. Don't ask why, lol. I just wanted to test things at the marina to see if the transmission was pumping fluid, etc., because it was an unknown ebay acquisition, and I was worried about it. It works fine by the way, but it took a little linkage adjustment to get it to shift on demand.

So we fired it up at the docks, and it drew a crowd. Everyone seemed to be appreciative. The sound of the motor was spectacular. Numerous people started recalling their earlier days when they were kids, on Chris Craft boats, etc., and it's part of the fun having an old boat because it always invokes memories like this.

I took a pyrometer to everything, and true to form when we first did the test run on the garden hose, eveything was perfectly cool. I attribute this to the fact that I serviced the pump and those pressure regulator valves.

Then it came time to depart the dock and see what happened. This was a nerve wracking event. Off I went on a short excursion around the marina, Janet watched from the dock. At first I got NO RESPONSE FROM THE HELM. I couldn't figure it out, nothing seemed to be working. Guess what? The darn rack and pinion was turing the wrong way, ha ha ha. When I turned to the left, the boat wanted to go to the right. It was nuts. I ended up putting my hand on the bottom of the wheel, and if I wanted to go left, I would move my hand left (which is actually turning the wheel to the right). How this happened is beyond me, I guess it was too much beer during the steering installation time. I do recall looking over the transom seeing the rudder working, but never put it together. It will be an easy fix, however.

That didn't keep us from going out for a speed run. Of course, we did a lap around the marina and the idle adjustment was a bit high, and the harbormaster asked me to SLOW DOWN due to the wake, sheesh, a guy just can't have fun any more. He's a great guy, by the way, no problem there.

We went out the channel, depth sounder working perfectly, bilge pump working when needed (after getting the mud dabber work cleared out of the outlet). Giving it a bit of throttle, it was very apparent this boat has PLENTY OF POWER. It picked up and ran great. Steering was a challenge, ha ha. We turned back into our own wake and ran hard, the boat ran through that like it wasn't even there.

All said and done, we're thrilled. Now it is a matter of attending to details, doing a little tuning, swapping out the prop, and of course tending to that steering.

I'll be posting photos within the hour, stay tuned !

Regards,

Paul
That skiff is one of the sweetest boats I've seen in a long time. I am one of those guys you mentioned, who didn't even know CC made a glass skiff. I have to tell you, that boat looks so good without the windshield, I would hesitate to put one on it.

I am happy for you and Janet, after the odyssey you have been through, it is a chronicle of what to anticipate when you take on an old boat restoration project. Thankfully, you didn't get into the motor rebuild part (yet anyway).

I have been there, done that, but not necessarily to the same level of quality you have been able to achieve. I am one of those thousands who are watching. Congratulations, a job very well done! I am looking forward to seeing more photos of this one running on the river!

Roy
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Glen
Glen

September 17th, 2007, 2:41 am #125

After our run on the river we came back for another pass at the marina and we pulled up to the party dock. Alan Jackson had a few guys working on his spectacular new 1959 Rybovitch (more on THAT later !!)and they turned their heads and watched as we burbled by. Not only did they LOOK, they looked twice, lol. They are pretty boat savvy, being tasked with maintaing some of the finest vintage boats in the country. Later when one of the guys came over to look and chat a while, he said "we heard you coming, and we thought it must be Alan". Yes, this boat sounds great !!







Fun on the water Tennessee style ! I wish we got this boat on the water earlier, but in reality, we would not have used it in the 108-degree sweltering heat of the summer. It is amazing, just after September 1, it was like turning a big switch, and the weather suddenly became quite beautiful again. We got a little rain, and today I couldn't have asked for a prettier day. Thankfully, our season is long, so we'll be running this boat a lot until it freezes!

Regards,

Paul
Paul,

Thank you for bringing back a rare boat. Excellent work and great results!

Enjoy the fruit of your labor.

Glen
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Joined: August 30th, 2007, 4:00 am

September 17th, 2007, 4:27 am #126

You did it. Now you have to seriously think about trailering the Fiberskiff the Sunnyland Boat Show (official new name).

The no windshield look has a bit of Speed Skiff to it!

I will be jumping into the XL175 Sunlounger with both feet within a week. I will keep you posted of progress.

Great job Paul.

BIll Basler
Executive Director
Chris-Craft Antique Boat Club
www.chris-craft.org | www.TradingDock.org
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Paul
Paul

September 17th, 2007, 12:16 pm #127

Paul,

Thank you for bringing back a rare boat. Excellent work and great results!

Enjoy the fruit of your labor.

Glen
Hi Glen,

Thanks for the good words.

We put a little extra in this one because we plan to keep it in the fleet for a long time. It will see water skiing duty next season, perhaps a little bit this season in a wet suit. It will be the boat we use in the morning to go from our lake front cottage across Old Hickory Lake to Gallatin Marina, where they serve a very nice breakfast! We'll also take it up river to Cherokee Steak House, which is located at the largest marina on the upstream side of Old Hickory. Our 38 Commander will continue to be used to entertain guests and make those wonderful all day anchorages we love so much.

Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

September 17th, 2007, 12:32 pm #128

You did it. Now you have to seriously think about trailering the Fiberskiff the Sunnyland Boat Show (official new name).

The no windshield look has a bit of Speed Skiff to it!

I will be jumping into the XL175 Sunlounger with both feet within a week. I will keep you posted of progress.

Great job Paul.

BIll Basler
Executive Director
Chris-Craft Antique Boat Club
www.chris-craft.org | www.TradingDock.org
Hi Bill,

Just curious about the switch to Tavares, or where-ever, rather than Mt. Dora. We love the town of Mt. Dora, and we even booked a room there, so we're not too happy about the change of location. The change of venue also makes us a bit aprehensive about bringing a boat, not knowing where we'll be, or what the conditions are, etc. Since I've been to the last three Dora shows, I know the place like the back of my hand.

As for the Sunnyland event, we'll give it some consideration. Right now it doesn't sound like such a good idea due to this being the end of the summer season, but come March, after a cold winter, we may be suffering from cabin fever and ready to go.

Not knowing the circumstances, I'll refrain from further comment, but we're not happy to see the show leave Mt. Dora. For the organizers of the event, I hope they realize that the town of Mt. Dora was half the draw. It was not just the boats, because without the delightful walking downtown environment in the evening, the boats just didn't do it alone. I'm wondering what the restaurant scene is like in Tavares, or if they even have one!!

Back to the boat! It sure was a thrill to be able to pull this one out of the shed and splash it. What is even more gratifying, is the fact that the motor gives every appearance of being able to run without a rebuild. We knew it ran, but didn't know how well. I am pretty sure once I give it the speed-tune-up, it will do just fine.

Yes, the boat does look a bit like a Speed Skiff, except you're not driving from the transom! I like the look, but we'll be installing the windshield in a week or so.

Please do keep us posted on your project. We'd love to follow the progress, see some photos, and give you some assistance if and when we can. When you get ready to dive in, we can start a dedicated thread to the project. From the looks we got yesterday in a hidden little marina with few people there, I know we (and you) will be getting a LOT of lookers when the boat gets more exposure.

Cheers! Thanks for the note, all the best,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

September 17th, 2007, 12:40 pm #129

Wow what a happy day today is ! Yesterday I took my time, not really knowing if we would go to the water or not. As it turned out, I worked and worked on various things, and it got late in the day and we decided to try for Sunday.

Rather than getting up at the crack of dawn, as we planned, we slept in and enjoyed the Sunday morning, and we eventually got to the marina around noon.

We launched the boat and pulled it around to the gas dock. We gassed up before arriving at the marina. There I noticed we were taking on water so I tightened the shaft log and rudder log accordingly. Everything looked secure, we didn't see any fuel leaks, the water intrusion was stopped, and the bilge pump made quick work of the evacuation.

Since this was the first time any fuel had gone into the filter or into the new fuel lines, I knew I would have to crank the motor a lot in order to get it started. This was the case.

Finally, with a little encouragement from a can of starter fluid, things came to life and it pumped enough fuel to light up and continue running. It coughed and smoked down the fuel dock, ha ha, and burn off some of that carbon and oil I used to lube things up with.

After that, the motor ran reasonably well, especially due to the fact that is has NOT BEEN TUNED at all. I have a wrong carb off a 1959 283 Chris Craft, and have not timed the boat, nor have I even put in new plugs or set the points. I knew it would run, so I decided to test it as it was. Don't ask why, lol. I just wanted to test things at the marina to see if the transmission was pumping fluid, etc., because it was an unknown ebay acquisition, and I was worried about it. It works fine by the way, but it took a little linkage adjustment to get it to shift on demand.

So we fired it up at the docks, and it drew a crowd. Everyone seemed to be appreciative. The sound of the motor was spectacular. Numerous people started recalling their earlier days when they were kids, on Chris Craft boats, etc., and it's part of the fun having an old boat because it always invokes memories like this.

I took a pyrometer to everything, and true to form when we first did the test run on the garden hose, eveything was perfectly cool. I attribute this to the fact that I serviced the pump and those pressure regulator valves.

Then it came time to depart the dock and see what happened. This was a nerve wracking event. Off I went on a short excursion around the marina, Janet watched from the dock. At first I got NO RESPONSE FROM THE HELM. I couldn't figure it out, nothing seemed to be working. Guess what? The darn rack and pinion was turing the wrong way, ha ha ha. When I turned to the left, the boat wanted to go to the right. It was nuts. I ended up putting my hand on the bottom of the wheel, and if I wanted to go left, I would move my hand left (which is actually turning the wheel to the right). How this happened is beyond me, I guess it was too much beer during the steering installation time. I do recall looking over the transom seeing the rudder working, but never put it together. It will be an easy fix, however.

That didn't keep us from going out for a speed run. Of course, we did a lap around the marina and the idle adjustment was a bit high, and the harbormaster asked me to SLOW DOWN due to the wake, sheesh, a guy just can't have fun any more. He's a great guy, by the way, no problem there.

We went out the channel, depth sounder working perfectly, bilge pump working when needed (after getting the mud dabber work cleared out of the outlet). Giving it a bit of throttle, it was very apparent this boat has PLENTY OF POWER. It picked up and ran great. Steering was a challenge, ha ha. We turned back into our own wake and ran hard, the boat ran through that like it wasn't even there.

All said and done, we're thrilled. Now it is a matter of attending to details, doing a little tuning, swapping out the prop, and of course tending to that steering.

I'll be posting photos within the hour, stay tuned !

Regards,

Paul
I appreciate the comments. With old fiberglass Chris Craft boats out there, the hobbyist has no need to spend hard earned cash on a new boat. If we have to rebuild this motor, we'll do so with the understanding that we plan to keep the boat and run it long and hard. Even with a rebuild, the ultimate cost of a full restoration with "as new" relibility is about a third the cost of a new boat that would do what this one will do, and the new one would look like a plastic jelly bean.

Our next project is going to be to do some major cosmetic work on our 1956 17' Chris Craft Sportsman Utility. It also has a 327 but with a little more power. It's wood, so I'll have to get back into the varnish thing, but I've done it numerous times before. Wood boats are great fun, but the classic glass is the way to go if you want something that will run long and hard with minimum concerns about the hull and finish. Every time we took the mahogany boats out, we were always very concerned about getting a scrape, etc.

I appreciate your comments, thank you, all the best.

Paul

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John Kloka
John Kloka

September 17th, 2007, 1:24 pm #130

After our run on the river we came back for another pass at the marina and we pulled up to the party dock. Alan Jackson had a few guys working on his spectacular new 1959 Rybovitch (more on THAT later !!)and they turned their heads and watched as we burbled by. Not only did they LOOK, they looked twice, lol. They are pretty boat savvy, being tasked with maintaing some of the finest vintage boats in the country. Later when one of the guys came over to look and chat a while, he said "we heard you coming, and we thought it must be Alan". Yes, this boat sounds great !!







Fun on the water Tennessee style ! I wish we got this boat on the water earlier, but in reality, we would not have used it in the 108-degree sweltering heat of the summer. It is amazing, just after September 1, it was like turning a big switch, and the weather suddenly became quite beautiful again. We got a little rain, and today I couldn't have asked for a prettier day. Thankfully, our season is long, so we'll be running this boat a lot until it freezes!

Regards,

Paul
Congrats, Paul and Janet! I was wondering if "life" had intruded on this project and she might not see the lake until next spring... I should have known better! I can't imagine anything better than an early morning run for breakfast in that little beauty. Thanks for sharing!
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