Rickard
Rickard

July 16th, 2007, 10:10 pm #111

Hi Paul

I plan on doing this job during winter so this is very interesting to follow. It's the same thing on my boat, all pitting is under the canvas. But the outside looks a bit greyish and dull.

By the way, our boat is going to look new. Very nice job!

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

July 21st, 2007, 7:24 pm #112

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Today I traced all the wires at the engine and I'm ready to launch. I have a couple of new circuits I need to run back to a new bilge pump, sniffer, and blower, but that's a piece of cake.

I've been scrubbing down the topsides with "Softscrub" and it's doing a very nice job. I could have (and should have) already varnished up the dashboard but I waited until I knew what other instruments would be installed below that dashboard so I could stain both pieces together under the same conditions.

Here is a photo of the final dash and new (matching) under-dash being stained. These were ever so carefully contoured and sanded to perfection. The underdash contains a depth sounder gauge, the trim tab controls, switches, an accessory outlet, and the Ivalite spotlight control. The stain is Interlux Chris Craft Mahogany Stain #573, which has a beautiful reddish color. I've used this on speedboats in the past and I really like the color a lot better than the "walnut" coloration some people use. For interior use I'd go with the "walnut" but for a speedboat, heck, go with the red !


I applied this until it started to dry over. Then I used a rag with Interlux Bushing Thinner #333 to wipe everything down. What this does, is allow the staining of the wood and the filling of pores, but it wipes off the pigmented film off the wood. The result is a jewelry like final finish (I'm giving up some of my secrets here!)

It doesn't really matter if you have some specks of debris during the staining process, as these can be wiped off before the application of that first coat of varnish. Here is a freshly stained piece of mahogany.


Here is a comparison between my new (Honduran) mahogany from my shop stock, and the original 41-year old piece of what probably is Philippine mahogany from Chris Craft. The stain is the same, and the final finish will look almost identical. This is acceptable because none of the old and new pieces are abutted. Trust me on this one, lol.


Later today as the stain cures out, I'll put a first "dry coat" of varnish on to seal everything. Later in the week I'll reapply additional thin coats of full strength varnish and will probably be ready for the dashboard installation next week-end. I have found it's far better to apply several thin coats (which dry almost instantly) than to float that heavy gloss build coat, because it takes forever to dry, it is exposed wet to dust longer, it will potentially soften any varnish underneath that isn't fully cured and it will cause a wrinkle, and it takes FOREVER to fully cure out and get hard. Therefore, several dry coats are best! The dashboard will look like a museum piece when done, or it won't be installed until it does.

While this work is curing out, I'm going after the windshield and other metal pieces. This requires a sanding, a prep wash with degreaser, the application of a self-etching primer, potentially some high-build additional primer coats to fill corrosion pit marks, and a final coating of highly polished chrome industrial coating. At this time I am not sure if I'll do the final clear coat or not. This decision will be made after I view another test piece.

Hope everyone is on the water today, I'll be on the water later this evening, but right now it's back to work!!!

Regards, Paul




UPDATE: I applied a coating of Pettit #2018 Clear Sealer, which is essentially a thinned down lightweight varnish intended for sealing plywood to keep it from checking, and also to be used as the first coat over stained wood. I have used a thinned down varnish in the past, but I hate to add thinner because it alters the chemistry of the varnish. This way it's right out of the can, engineered by Pettit to dry in 4 hours for sanding. It's already dry. I'll be heading out to Old Hickory Lake later this afternoon, so I'll probably go ahead and apply the first dry build coat of varnish and place these pieces in the basement where they can cure out for another 12 to 18 hours. I like the Pettit, good stuff. They also make one heck of a varnish, called "High Build" but you can NOT rush that stuff. I've used it on top decks of wood speedboats in the past, you can lay it down thick, and it finishes out glass smooth. You can literally shave in it. Only problem with High Build, you have to let it dry for a week before you dare add another coat! I have a stock of Epifanes, Schooner 96 and High Build, and I may use a light dry-brush coating of the High Build at such time when I know I won't be rushing another coat.

I've tried Lightning Spar in the past, it dries with lightning speed. I also have a couple cans of water based varnish, but I've always been too chicken to use it on anything of value, lol. Oh well..........time for a beer!

Regards, Paul











Last edited by FEfinaticP on July 21st, 2007, 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

July 23rd, 2007, 3:39 am #113

Here's my helper and wood finishing student, Xuma Metcalf and her Uncle Paul showing off the two piece dashboard for the Skiff project.

The big piece is line-for-line identical to the original dash, only made of real mahogany instead of wood grain vinyl on masonite; it caries two large restored gauges, some aux switches and the ignition switch. The lower dash is hung below and a little behind, and it will carry the digital depth gauge, the trim tab controls, switches, aux electric outlet and light, Xintex Fireboy auto blower sniffer, and the Ivilite





She was quite amazed to see me sanding these pieces dull this afternoon, only to see them gleam like this. I have one sealer coat on that stain, a full strength coat of lightly brushed Pettit High Build, and one nice coat of Epifanes. That Epifanes is awesome stuff!

I'll do one more sanding and another final coat of Epifanes. These pieces look very red in the photo but it's a result of the flash. They are lightly pigmented and lots of the real wood grain shows through. They're quite nice!

Regards,

Uncle Paul
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Paul
Paul

September 16th, 2007, 1:46 am #114

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






The Sea Skiff came out of the cocoon and got it’s first bath today. All the work that has gone into it has been small bits of time at a time, some shop time, waiting for shipments of steering systems, instruments, various devices like depth sounders and blowers, transmissions, and risers. The main engine stringers were repaired, fiberglass stringers were reinforced. The engine was run, sounded good, transmission sounded terrible and it was replaced, along with some leaking exhaust logs.

Today the boat got a bath and the topsides were scrubbed down with soft-scrub. The chlorine in the softscrub makes it a great product for whitening dirty gelcoat.

All the basics are hooked up, and tomorrow we’ll splash it at the crack of dawn before anyone gets to the marina. I’ll fuel it up at a gas station a few miles from the marina. I’ll have my pyrometer handy, and we’ll just spend the day checking everything and having some fun.

Here are some photos of the work under way.

I have left the instruments out for now, due to the fact that I’m still cleaning things up. They’ll be a piece of cake to install, and I’ll do that in the morning. They’ve already been in and tested, and I decided to remove them for safety during all this fuss.


Here is how the dashboard worked out. Rather than install the cheap masonite with fake wood grain vinyl, I decided to do a custom mahogany dash. It is custom routed on the backside to clear the custom (new) steering assembly. That steering wheel is original, but nothing behind it is. It has all new rack and pinion, and cable drive. That’s a depth sounder on the lower left, put on the port side so the passenger can help keep an eye on the depth. On the right side is an Ivalite control, and there is a sinffer module next to that. All the switches are double pull, so they do the work of two switches. They control a blower, which the boat did not have originally, and two bilge pumps, that have an automatic setting and manual controlled by a single double pull switch.



Here’s a view of the boat showing off some of the mahogany. I’m leaving off the windshield until testing is completed. Also, the keen eye may see the fore deck has not been cleaned off yet. After this photo was taken, we broke out the champagne and had a toast, and then I spent some time scrubbing off all the fingerprints and that fore deck too.

There is a piece of vinyl wrapped plywood missing just below the throttle control and gear selector. I pulled it off so I had access to routing wires up to the dash.

See the next post for more photos taken today....

Regards, Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on September 16th, 2007, 2:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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September 16th, 2007, 1:47 am #115




Here she is as she came out of the cocoon this morning. First time out in months. This was a good opportunity to take a hose to it and wash everything down. My cocoon served me very well, not leaking a drop. It will now be dismantled.


Here is a side view right after the boat came out. It’s 20 feet in length, and you can see it’s a little longer than my 928


As the day got longer the boat got cleaner. The keen eye may see a champagne flute near the aft section of the starboard side. We’re looking forward to tomorrow, and of course, I’ll take plenty of photos.

Regards, all the best,

Paul

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September 16th, 2007, 10:26 pm #116

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Wow what a happy day today is ! Yesterday I took my time, not really knowing if we would go to the water or not. As it turned out, I worked and worked on various things, and it got late in the day and we decided to try for Sunday.

Rather than getting up at the crack of dawn, as we planned, we slept in and enjoyed the Sunday morning, and we eventually got to the marina around noon.

We launched the boat and pulled it around to the gas dock. We gassed up before arriving at the marina. There I noticed we were taking on water so I tightened the shaft log and rudder log accordingly. Everything looked secure, we didn't see any fuel leaks, the water intrusion was stopped, and the bilge pump made quick work of the evacuation.

Since this was the first time any fuel had gone into the filter or into the new fuel lines, I knew I would have to crank the motor a lot in order to get it started. This was the case.

Finally, with a little encouragement from a can of starter fluid, things came to life and it pumped enough fuel to light up and continue running. It coughed and smoked down the fuel dock, ha ha, and burn off some of that carbon and oil I used to lube things up with.

After that, the motor ran reasonably well, especially due to the fact that is has NOT BEEN TUNED at all. I have a wrong carb off a 1959 283 Chris Craft, and have not timed the boat, nor have I even put in new plugs or set the points. I knew it would run, so I decided to test it as it was. Don't ask why, lol. I just wanted to test things at the marina to see if the transmission was pumping fluid, etc., because it was an unknown ebay acquisition, and I was worried about it. It works fine by the way, but it took a little linkage adjustment to get it to shift on demand.

So we fired it up at the docks, and it drew a crowd. Everyone seemed to be appreciative. The sound of the motor was spectacular. Numerous people started recalling their earlier days when they were kids, on Chris Craft boats, etc., and it's part of the fun having an old boat because it always invokes memories like this.

I took a pyrometer to everything, and true to form when we first did the test run on the garden hose, eveything was perfectly cool. I attribute this to the fact that I serviced the pump and those pressure regulator valves.

Then it came time to depart the dock and see what happened. This was a nerve wracking event. Off I went on a short excursion around the marina, Janet watched from the dock. At first I got NO RESPONSE FROM THE HELM. I couldn't figure it out, nothing seemed to be working. Guess what? The darn rack and pinion was turing the wrong way, ha ha ha. When I turned to the left, the boat wanted to go to the right. It was nuts. I ended up putting my hand on the bottom of the wheel, and if I wanted to go left, I would move my hand left (which is actually turning the wheel to the right). How this happened is beyond me, I guess it was too much beer during the steering installation time. I do recall looking over the transom seeing the rudder working, but never put it together. It will be an easy fix, however.

That didn't keep us from going out for a speed run. Of course, we did a lap around the marina and the idle adjustment was a bit high, and the harbormaster asked me to SLOW DOWN due to the wake, sheesh, a guy just can't have fun any more. He's a great guy, by the way, no problem there.

We went out the channel, depth sounder working perfectly, bilge pump working when needed (after getting the mud dabber work cleared out of the outlet). Giving it a bit of throttle, it was very apparent this boat has PLENTY OF POWER. It picked up and ran great. Steering was a challenge, ha ha. We turned back into our own wake and ran hard, the boat ran through that like it wasn't even there.

All said and done, we're thrilled. Now it is a matter of attending to details, doing a little tuning, swapping out the prop, and of course tending to that steering.

I'll be posting photos within the hour, stay tuned !

Regards,

Paul
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Joined: February 2nd, 2007, 5:28 pm

September 16th, 2007, 11:52 pm #117

Sounds like a great day overall. Those small "issues" just keep you thinking of what you need to do and help continue the passion for working on this boat. Bon Voyage!
Bill P
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Paul
Paul

September 16th, 2007, 11:59 pm #118

Thanks, Bill,

We had a big day, and we're still smiling ! Here we are on our "mountain top" ready do wind down the steep driveway.




We couldn't believe we were saying "well, I guess we're ready to roll". The more I see of that hull, the more I like it.

Here we are at Commodore Yacht Club, which is about 15 minutes from our house, and where we keep TRADITION.




We checked everything, made sure the drain plugs were in and all straps off, and down the ramp she went !!


More photos in the next posting...............

Regards, Paul
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September 17th, 2007, 12:08 am #119


Since this was our first launching with this rig, we didn’t really know how deep to place the trailer so we just took it in easy steps until the boat floated nicely. What fun! We were just like a couple of kids.





What a thrill it was to see the boat floating! I've been climbing up that ladder in our temporary enclosure for months, taking care of all the details, and now there she was floating. I'm still smiling






It's a clean look without that windshield. I like it a lot. However, I guess we'll install that windshield.

More photos follow................

regards,

Paul
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September 17th, 2007, 12:15 am #120





We walked it over to the fuel dock where I could look things over with some peace and quiet.

The transmission was an unknown. I was sort of worried about it. Upon starting the motor I tried the tranny, and I knew it would have to pump fluid through the system before it worked. I soon got a nice reverse gear, but no forward. I went back and unhooked the linkage and switched it manually and bingo, a nice forward gear!

I adjusted the linkage so we got forward on demand. Idle was a bit too high too, so I adjusted linkage there too. The carb, however, is due to being changed out.

We took on some water initially due to the shaft and rudder logs, and a few hose connections being too loose. In addition, for some reason the stopcocks on those new risers were open too. Not to worry, the motor was running cool, pumping lots of water (the impeller was well lubricated with olive oil). The flywheel on this flywheel aft motor started kicking up some spray when the bilge water got high. I think Bill Policastro noted this the other day too. Bilge pumps located fore and aft seem to work quite nicely, and since the water intrusion stopped quickly this was not a long lived problem.

Once the motor was started and the transmission linkage was adjusted a little better, it was off for a tour around the marina! Then, we decided to head out onto the river since things seemed to be going well and we got all the water leakage stopped. There were several hoses and some stop-cocks that were needing attention.




The look of worry, but also of satisfaction! At this time we were still concerned about the temperature of the risers being okay, which they were. I was noticing a little missing, and I was thinking about a carb swap and doing a proper tune up on this motor. It was remarkable how well it ran with just a new cap and rotor.

More photos follow..............

Regards, Paul
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