Paul
Paul

July 4th, 2007, 9:38 pm #101

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






My visiting niece, Xuma Metcalf, is shown here giving Uncle Paul some assistance with those few remaining hoses that should be replaced.


Here is a photo showing the relative size of this beamy Sea Skiff. No problem getting 5 kids on the back seat of this boat!


Work continues as the day cools down, on wiring issues.

Regards,
Paul
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Anonymous
Anonymous

July 7th, 2007, 4:49 am #102

Hi Bill,

I guess it's okay for the Executive Director of the Chris Craft Antique Boat Club to be working on a Gar Wood !

Save those vacuum tubes! They're probably worth their weight in gold on the vacuum tube black market, especially in Cuba, lol!

Finding the 1932 penny and a 30's vintage can of oil, that is great stuff!

When I found the "artifacts" in my project boat, I was really taken aback. I went out and put my hand on the boat and gave it a pat as I said "Alfred Goodman" out loud. I think the boat appreciated it. Boats have a soul of sorts, and knowing the history helps in the appreciation factor. Knowing a guy like Alfred Goodman had this boat on Lake George, and knowing his now retired surgeon son learned to water ski behind the boat just adds to the appreciation.

All boats have a history of fun and excitement, and if they could only talk, just think what an interesting tale they would tell! I imgaine they liked some owners more than others. I hope my Sea Skiff likes me, because if there's one thing you do NOT want, it's a vindictive boat!!

Regards,

all the best,

Paul
According to my wife, I've never met a boat I didn't want. This has plagued me since childhood, and it's not getting any better. RIght now I am tackling the old Corsair. The 1942 barrelback is moving along slowly as is the 1936 Gar Wood.

Regarding your comments about the history...that is very rewarding to me. I love the research, and the feeling that I get saving these old boats. 2 out of the three of my boats would have certainly met the scrap yard within a couple of years. A Chris-Craft barrelback scrapped? It still happens. I am so in tune with the history of these boat that I have been in contact with all of the families that have owned them over the years. They are all cordial and very grateful that their boats are in good hands.

I mentioned to my wife that these boats have such interesting "souls" that I should name them all after their prior owners. In each case, the prior owners had intended to restore the old boats, but just never quite got there. If I carry through with that thought, it would make the Gar Wood Adolph, the barrelback Larry, and the Corsair, Mikki's Bomb!!!

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Paul
Paul

July 7th, 2007, 10:26 pm #103

My visiting niece, Xuma Metcalf, is shown here giving Uncle Paul some assistance with those few remaining hoses that should be replaced.


Here is a photo showing the relative size of this beamy Sea Skiff. No problem getting 5 kids on the back seat of this boat!


Work continues as the day cools down, on wiring issues.

Regards,
Paul
Varnishing you say? On a fiberglass boat? Yes, there are 8 pieces of exposed mahogany on this boat. I haven't lost my touch. Mahogany is a beautiful wood to work with, and Schooner 96 works just fine over Interlux CC stain.

Seat hardware is now getting ready. Yes, I know, this is taking forever, but if you could keep me out of the restaurant and pool up on Old Hickory Lake, I would be able to get a lot more work done! Too much socializing, driving back and forth, and not enough quality boat time!

I'll post another series of photos, I think you'll be amazed!

Paul
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 3:42 am

July 9th, 2007, 3:12 am #104

Paul - I have enjoyed watching your progress in this thread. It looks like you're getting close. That has to be exciting. I was up at the lake this week end. I visited the old girl and she is ready for some attention. The marina moved her into the workshop a couple weeks ago. I am heading up this Thursday eve. I plan on getting busy and just hope for some cooler weather. I will be bombarding you with progress photos and annoying everyone with questions very soon. HOW MANY DAYS UNTIL ALGONAC?

Keep Rockin!
Chris
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Paul
Paul

July 14th, 2007, 6:51 pm #105

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






All kinds of work had to be done before this was done. The list is way too long to list, but int includes stringer work, engine work, a new transmission, all upholstery vinyl work, you get the idea.

Well I sure am glad I took photos of this stuff. When you take something apart you always figure you’ll be able to remember how to put it back together again. However, when it turns to several months, things get a bit foggy. Did that drive arm go in perpendicular to the handle or parallel to the handle? Beats the heck outa me!

Fortunately these photos took care of the questions. Things didn’t bolt up perfectly though, because I am running a different carb and the drive arm on the carb is a little different. All it took was a little adjustment on the threaded rods. As you can sense. Things are getting ready for a test run.







Pretty slick how this works. One lever causes the motor to idle down before you can change gears. As the lever changes gears the throttle part is held up on that dull red armature, to it won’t really affect the throttle as it rotates a little. However, by switching into gear and continuing to move the lever, you can get increased rpm as you continue to move the lever (in forward or reverse). Very simple, very slick.

Paul
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Paul
Paul

July 14th, 2007, 6:53 pm #106



I found a nice chromed lever at the flea market in Mt. Dora last March. The guy wanted ten bucks. It fit perfectly, and you really have to know what you’re looking for in that maze of boat parts at these flea markets. I saw the part and thought, “well I’ll be darned”. The housing was sanded to remove pitting, primed, and painted with an industrial silver coating and clear coated. We’ll see how that works, and if it needs attention later then I’ll have it chromed.

Here’s how bad the original stuff looked. It was in perfect working condition, just pitted. I was in the process of sanding the lever down for re-chroming when I found a perfect one at the flea market. Amazing what you can find. Wonder where it was originally?





The internal gears are pretty indestructible. Very simple, and this should last forever.





Paul
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Paul
Paul

July 16th, 2007, 2:02 am #107

The chrome potmetal handle was found at a boat show flea market so it didn't have to be rechromed. The housing was coated with a industrial mag wheel coating, and clear coated. At some later time I may have it chromed.


A hair dryer was used to help bend the vinyl around those tight corners.

Regards, Paul

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Paul
Paul

July 16th, 2007, 2:12 am #108

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Here is one of 7 pieces of varnished mahogany on this fiberglass boat. The mahogany piece is actually a duct leading from the air scoop to the bilge. It's cut on an angle, very complex, one side is different from the other. Everything you see is new, the old pieces were used as an exact template.





The large side vinyl pieces are clad with new vinyl but they're the original pieces of 1/4" marine plywood. Note the edge protection piece on that side panel, it's a white vinyl piece that was dyed with a vinyl spray. The vinyl spray works great too, very durable, as it actually fuses to the substrate.

Later this evening I installed two forward pieces up in the bow, which contain two more pieces of brightly finished mahogany. I will be adding two additional pieces of mahogany to this boat, the dashboard and the under dash which will contain additional switches, a round dial depth sounder and a Xintex sniffer control.

Regards, Paul

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Rickard
Rickard

July 16th, 2007, 4:35 pm #109

The chrome potmetal handle was found at a boat show flea market so it didn't have to be rechromed. The housing was coated with a industrial mag wheel coating, and clear coated. At some later time I may have it chromed.


A hair dryer was used to help bend the vinyl around those tight corners.

Regards, Paul
Looks very nice Paul! Is the mag wheel coating the finish that you are going to use on the windshiled frame too?

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

July 16th, 2007, 4:42 pm #110

I have experimented a bit with two of the Eastwood finishes and two clear coats. One is their ALUMABLAST, which looks every bit the identical finish you would find on a cast aluminum part. It is so authentic it's quite amazing. The other is their highly polished "chrome" look, which is what I used.

I used a special commercial grade degreaser/prep, then a self etching primer, and then the silver coating. It looked very bright at that point, maybe too bright. However, the application of the clear coat took off some of the "bright paint look" and gave it a nice luster.

I will experiment on some scrap pieces of aluminum prior to doing the final deed with the windshield, and it is ready now. The front deck has been scrubbed down in anticipation of reinstalling the windshield now.

I will need some sanding time, in order to build up enough film to hide the corrosion pitting on some of this. The outside of the windshield looks good, but for some reason the inside is pitted. I guess that's the part that lived under cover and got condensation moisture. The same thing has happened with my Commander windshield, the exterior looks fine, but there is some pitting on the inside which is supposed to be the dry side. Go figure ~!

Regards,

Paul
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