TRADITION roared tonight !

TRADITION roared tonight !

Paul
Paul

August 13th, 2013, 1:55 am #1

Well we've had lots of rain here in Tennessee, the river was rolling, thunderstorms were all around. It seemed like a good time for a boat ride. Wide open throttles, 427's singing, the 1966 38 Express is a beast!



Regards,

Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on August 13th, 2013, 1:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 10:31 pm

August 13th, 2013, 2:23 am #2

Paul --

What a great picture! (Where's the audio?)

Regards,
Cliff
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Joined: June 7th, 2006, 2:28 am

August 13th, 2013, 3:23 am #3

You're washing the deer off the river banks!!

Glad to see you blowing em out and having fun!,

Greg Mason
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Paul
Paul

August 13th, 2013, 1:16 pm #4

The motors has (as some readers know) been changed out to a high voltage ignition system, 50,000 volts right to the plugs. The transformation was more involved than I anticipated for a standard cooling system (closed cooling guys get a convenient pass on this due to the cooling system plumbing taking a different route) but the work was not rocket science, just needed to be sure it was very secure.

I have to say, since the DUI distributors have gone in, the boat has not missed a single pulse during multiple test runs, and last night I did run at wide open throttle long enough to satisfy myself all is well. The photo was taken while running around 3000 I think, not sure. My next project is to rebuild port carb. Always something. The accelerator pump is not working very well on that side, thankfully I have a couple spare carbs I can build in the shop and just do the swap when it is convenient. I would recommend everyone do that; always have a spare around, you can protect your boating adventures that way, because it only takes 30 minutes to change one out, wash your hands, and be working on a cold one.

It was very humid last night on the Cumberland. You can see from the photo that the big dogs were leaving their own vapor trail, and you can also see the humidity in the air. WOW !!

regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

August 13th, 2013, 2:09 pm #5

As noted, the closed cooling 427 is a much easier swap because the plumbing castings are out of the way. You can see from the photos what I had to do to re-route things. For a moment I thought I might have to have a custom fabrication made, but I ended up being lucky enough to be able to do this myself with little more than a pipe cutter, torch, flux, and solder. The plumbing I installed is freely supported by rubber on both sides, no hard connections, this is necessary to assure long live in a vibration environment. All solder joints were very carefully sanded with 1000 grit paper and heavily fluxed to assure a very strong joint.

As for the actual distributor itself; well it is a drop in with ONE WIRE HOOK UP.
The voltage is so hot I actually opened up the plug gap to something like .052"

Here is a series of photos showing the basic process one must go through to do this swap on a STANDARD COOLING MOTOR.











REALITY CHECK TIME, UHHH OHHHH, DANG THING WON'T FIT !!!!
Note there is a physical contact with the plumbing casting and the throttle plate assy.
This distributor is very large, contains the coil, everything.



So on that cold winter night I retreated back to my shop where I have a pair of 427 motors. I took a Standard Cooling casting and turned it sideways to see if that might work, and it did !!!!!!!!! I mocked up the copper connections and the modified throttle plate assy, and just went back to the boat and hooke everything up. Two photos below are of my spare engine in the shop.



Here is what has to be done for the Standard Cooled 427 to use one of these big distributors.



After initial size set-up, I decided to add collars at the ends. This adds strength and also helps close the gap nicely between the copper and the inside surface of the hose.




And then the throttle plate had to be cut out (Photo below is from my spare 427 in the shop).
Let the cutting and griding begin!









Actual work progressed in the evenings during March. Not exactly warm and cozy down there.




Here you can see from this video, no green on any of the hills, as it was still winter time in Tennessee.
Just out doing a test run. This was with the old fuel pumps (little did I know one was starting to fail).
I think this photo was taken on March 9, 2013. Not exactly a warm day, but hey any day on the water is a GOOD DAY !

(same video below, two alternatives to view it)
http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Dogshar ... 0.mp4.html

http://www.youtube.com/embed/HSCGjIaQAvY?rel=0


The transformation to electric fuel pumps was a very positive one. During this transformation I discovered one of my carbs will fire up the motor instantly and the other one won't unless I hold the choke closed manually. Odd, and I think the reason is the offending carb has a bad accelerator pump inside, we'll see because it will be coming apart sometime soon

Here it the thread on how I instlled electric fuel pumps on the 427 big dogs.
Note: I used a LOW PRESSURE CARTER fuel pump on stock Carter carbs. You do NOT want to use anything more than 6 psi on these carbs or you will have to use a pressure regulator and that is just one more thing that can go wrong.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/t ... rative+%29

For now the engines run well but I am still rebuilding some spare carbs. I'll soak and rebuild both at the same time. May as well have a good one waiting to go.


Regards,

Paul
FXA-38-3004-R
Original 327 power







Last edited by FEfinaticP on August 13th, 2013, 5:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

August 15th, 2013, 12:02 pm #6

Well we've had lots of rain here in Tennessee, the river was rolling, thunderstorms were all around. It seemed like a good time for a boat ride. Wide open throttles, 427's singing, the 1966 38 Express is a beast!



Regards,

Paul
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/a ... moon&n=171

We are taking a group to dinner, weather is perfect. With a 67-percent moon we wont need spotlights. Of course we run at idle speed at night.

Regards

Paul
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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 11:36 am

August 15th, 2013, 8:21 pm #7

It's going to be a perfect night for it. Won't be on the water myself. Tonight we bring home our new first mate. It's been two years since we lost Hannah and the time has come. He will be home tonight and will be on Freelancer tomorrow. Have to start em young. Take some photos of your moonlight cruise please.
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Paul
Paul

August 16th, 2013, 5:51 pm #8

Here is THE BEAST taking on fuel getting ready for the evening run.
Dang......washing one of these from stem to stern is a job, especially if you try to do it well.


Here is proof of delivery! Our group sitting out on the deck with TRADITION docked along side.
This was a birthday run for a good friend of ours, who can be seen sitting at the end of the table.
Everyone had a great time, and the Captain got to provide a couple docking demonstrations along the way!!


That 100W halogen spotlight on the bow is a necessity, by the way, if you are running the Cumberland River at night this time of year, after so much rain. I have it aimed so it reaches out a couple hundred yards and will illuminate anything floating. Since we have had so much rain we also get debris along with it, and thankfully I managed to avoid everything by selective use of this spotlight. The big spot we have up top is great for other things like illuminating the almost hidden entrance to our harbor on Overall Creek, or illuminating the opposite banks on either side of the river, but it is very poor for looking out for floating logs, etc., simply due to the fact that you get so much reflection off the foredeck and even the railing, your night vision is compromised. The bow mounted spot is the only way to run the river around here safely. The USCG would not like to see us using that because it would blind oncoming traffic, but we are polite enough to not do that and we only flip it on once and a while to be sure the way is clear. You have to adapt to the conditions you have, and anyone running a river system will be faced with this same situation if you run at night.

Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

December 2nd, 2013, 9:43 pm #9

Here are a couple more photos of the Standard Cooling System (note: the Closed System requires the grinding of the throttle plate but
everything else fits without modification). While this looks pretty simple, and it is, the actual discovery of just "how" to do this
was a bit tenuous, because I ordered the distributors thinking they would fit and discovered they did not after they were custom built
for me. Thankfully, the modifications turned out to be so simple.





Along with the grinding of the stock throttle plate, the T-fitting has to be rotated 90-degrees out of the way and you have
to make up the difference with new plumbing. As you can see in the earlier postings and these final shots, I chose heavily
prepped and soldered copper pipe that was not hard connected to anything, rubber isolated on both ends.

The result is a fire breathing monster that has spark plugs gapped at almost twice their normal gap.

So far the boat has not missed one beat since the installation, these distributors are great.

Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

March 26th, 2014, 10:54 pm #10

Steve Davis, of Davis Unified Ignition, Performance Distributors, sent me a couple nice notes today.

He is pleased he has some satisfied boating customers!

I have to tell you, my 1966 427s love that 50,000 volts to the spark plugs with the wider gap.
They run better than they ever have in the past.

Looking forward to a more reliable baoting season this year, and you know what that means: It means I need to check the wiring that the ignition switches, and all the way back to the motors and solenoids, etc., because loose wires do not fix themselves.

Back in 2006 when we were doing the photo shoot for MOTOR BOATING MAGAZINE, one of my engines acutally died on me during the shoot. It did not want to restart either. I ended up putting the starboard engine in gear while the port engine sustained our forward movement, and then hit the ignition switch with throttles partially open. The forward movement of the boat caught the rotation of the prop when the starter spun the motor and the combination sort of jump started that engine.

Preventative maintenance is what it's all about.

All that work and expense for the new distributors was a part of my PM program.
I hope it pays off.
So far neither engine has missed one beat after the new distributors.
One starts hard due to a carb issue right now, soon to be fixed.
However, once running, they sure run nice
A little hands-on experience from a bilge monkey

Time will tell.

Regards,

Paul
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