* The worthiness of the classic fiberglass Chris Craft Commander, Lancer and Corsair

* The worthiness of the classic fiberglass Chris Craft Commander, Lancer and Corsair

Paul
Paul

November 29th, 2011, 3:50 pm #1

This is an exerpt from the book,
"RESTORATION OF THE FIBERGLASS CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER,
Also featuring classic fiberglass Lancer and Corsair Runabouts !"

that I published in 2011.

The following copyrighted material is an exclusive here on The Forum.
It can be copied for your own personal use but it can not be copied to any other
web site or publication without written permission from me.

This represents 7 pages of 242 pages in the RESTORATION book, and more information
about the book can be found at the following link.
http://www.network54.com/Forum/672414/t ... 1291933074

The information is published on the world wide web to help get the message
out about the value, style, and integrity of the classic Chris Craft boats, and to motivate
more people to appreciate and save these boats world-wide. It is a part of stated goal here
"to have fun and share information".

enjoy!

Paul
















Regards,

Paul




Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 4:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Philip Croff
Philip Croff

November 29th, 2011, 6:59 pm #2

Are they substantially different? I have a thing for those 281's which are what got me interested in CC's
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Paul
Paul

November 30th, 2011, 5:01 am #3

Hi Philip,

I don't know much about the Catalina line, except it seems they were an evolution of the Commander line, using some hull forms, and lots of similar engine and hardware. I have a 38 Catalina docked next to me at my marina and it is the same length as my 38 Commander, twice as tall and with twice as much interior room, being a totally different boat in every way. They were built after the prime Commander era, using lots of Commander techniques and knowledge, and everything I have heard suggests they are good boats. The Catalina next to me is in better condition than my own 38 Commander, but I have the better looking and faster boat, and you can hear my motors when they are running. The 38 Catalina is so quiet it has actually started and departed the harbor while I was inside my boat and I never heard it.

Regards,

Paul











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John Kloka
John Kloka

November 30th, 2011, 5:20 pm #4

Are they substantially different? I have a thing for those 281's which are what got me interested in CC's
I've looked at a large number of Catalinas over the years. The smaller ones, (25 and 28), seem to have been built on a budget, having aluminum hardware as opposed to stainless for rails, for example. The larger ones were built to a higher standard, to be sure.

I had the opportunity to own a very nice 1981 310 Catalina this past season, and put over 100 hours on her, including the annual 75 mile (each way) run to Put-In-Bay. The things I felt that made her a worthy vessel were solid 'glass hull and 'glass stringers... much like the original Commanders. That, combined with lots of stainless, and teak trim garnered many compliments at the docks. I will say that the glass and gel are not as heavy-duty as the original Commanders, but we all know why.

There is a lot of value in a well maintained Catalina. In fact, this fall when I put her up for sale, the first guy that looked at her bought her on the spot! I am now searching for next year's ride... but that's a subject for a seperate thread...

Klokanuts
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John Kloka
John Kloka

November 30th, 2011, 5:25 pm #5

Here are a couple shots...

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Paul
Paul

November 30th, 2011, 6:39 pm #6

Ultra clean boats of nice lines and good design always seem to sell, especially if they have the Chris Craft name too.

John, just remember, friends don't let friends buy SeaRays.

best,

Paul
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Philip Croff
Philip Croff

November 30th, 2011, 7:00 pm #7

I understand that the scope of this website (and this excellent book that I mean to buy soon) is "classic" fiberglass Chris Crafts. Is there a point where they are new enough to not be considered "classic"? Or is it more of a relative term, like with what's considered a "classic" car. Do things end with the Murray era? I can see how Amerosports are much different than a Catalina 281 or the 301 pictured above even being from around the same era. Then again there's an 84'alarm or so 42' Commander at my marina and the guy that transported my Coho has a 501 Constellation both awesome vessels
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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 11:36 am

November 30th, 2011, 10:01 pm #8

This is an exerpt from the book,
"RESTORATION OF THE FIBERGLASS CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER,
Also featuring classic fiberglass Lancer and Corsair Runabouts !"

that I published in 2011.

The following copyrighted material is an exclusive here on The Forum.
It can be copied for your own personal use but it can not be copied to any other
web site or publication without written permission from me.

This represents 7 pages of 242 pages in the RESTORATION book, and more information
about the book can be found at the following link.
http://www.network54.com/Forum/672414/t ... 1291933074

The information is published on the world wide web to help get the message
out about the value, style, and integrity of the classic Chris Craft boats, and to motivate
more people to appreciate and save these boats world-wide. It is a part of stated goal here
"to have fun and share information".

enjoy!

Paul
















Regards,

Paul



I have to disagree slightly with the 25' and 28' Catalinas being lower quality. The 25' boats were actually in production as Express Cruisers as early as 1973 and evolved into Catalinas. I have a 76 and other than the aluminum trim you mentioned the boat is remarkably sturdy and heavy. Jerry has a 25' Tournament Fisherman that was built on the same hull. While they don't have the panache or elegance of the Commanders, from everything I've read they are pretty well built and nice riding boats. I have to say, the 25' has a lot of cabin space and a nice sized deck for a 25. They're also dirt cheap, selling on ebay regularly for $3-$5k in the water and ready to cruise.

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Paul
Paul

November 30th, 2011, 10:38 pm #9


Is is not the intent of this forum to bash Chris Craft boats of any kind and I hope nobody thinks this post is doing so. It is a fact, however, that during the numerous transitions of ownership and presidential turnover at CC, various techniques and standards were used, and it is pretty clear the top quality boats are the oldest ones..........this quality is verified pretty much through the mid 19070s and then I personally lose the trail because our main focus is on the older classics.

It is my understanding (need to be verified with Boat US) that Boat US filed suit against Chris Craft due to call backs on this model. As I understand the issue, CC wasw taking short cuts by cutting the main fiberglass structural supports in order to install wires. This is obviously contrary to their present day and past performance, but I understand it did happen during a particular management regime and it was corrected as a result of the Boat US insurance claim action.

I would naturally be sure you were not looking at one of the boats built during that particular dark period of the otherwise brilliant CC history.

Someone please help me verify this, as I do NOT want to give out any incorrect info about CC or anyone else. As noted, I think you should contact an informed person who knows the history at Boat US.

-----------------------------------
As the boats evolved into the 1990s it seems the old quality was certainly gone.
The following is from the Boat US database, offered here only as a point of information, certainly due for follow up.




The 31-ft. Crowne is Chris Craft's
272 model:

1992 Chris Craft 272 Crowne:
07/27/92 Freshwater tank cracked, is leaking. Boat had to be
dismantled
at factory to access & remove tank. Faulty bonding system caused
extensive galvanic corrosion. Transmission failure. NUmerous minor
problems. Owner wanted both outdrives replaced; replacement all head
thru-hull fittings; replacement freshwater tank; guarantee that any
undetected electrical problems will be corrected by manufacturer. Owner
says Chris Craft took care of all problems.

1991 Chris Craft Crowne 272 (CCBFT179D191):
06/11/93 Cracks throughout boat's interior, surveyor attributes to
manufacturer's defect: especially vertical displacement of liner. (Owner
also reports same problems w/ a 302 Crowne CCBFT180D191 owned by a
friend of his) Owner says manufacturer wants to make more repairs but
more problems are surfacing. He wants replacement boat. 9/8:
Manufacturer maintains that boat can be fixed.

1991 Chris Craft 272 Crowne (CCBFS102A091); twin OMC 5.7L King
Cobra I/Os:
01/09/95 Blisters: extensive on bottom & sides; cracks pt/stbd @
chines
& strakes from trim tabs fwd. Prior to purchase, boat trim tabs were
repositioned 3 times & holes weren't filled properly, stress cracks have
developed in adjacent areas. Pt side appears to have been repaired
(why???) prior to purchase, repairs are inadequate & full of pinholes.
Corrosion on engine even though boat is kept in fresh water. Leaks
through rubrail into cabin & windshield. Canvas doesn't fit properly.
Owner has already spent several thousand $s on hull repairs. Chris Craft
is willing to pay for repairs but won't say how much, describe how should
be repaired or guarantee against further problems.






Sincerely, regards,

Paul
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Joined: October 22nd, 2011, 1:58 am

November 30th, 2011, 11:11 pm #10

Last year the '84 (or so) 42' Commander received a lot of bottom work due to blisters, while my Coho has none and from what I've read here, probably never has had blisters and never will.

'71 33' Catalina Coho Sedan under restoration
'85 Bayliner Capri 19' cuddy 3.0L OMC, new deck and stringers
'87 Kawasaki JS650SX
'70 Amphicat 6x6 AATV (future Coho tender)

'74 Buick LeSabre Luxus convertible, '07 Subaru Forester 5MT
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