The new 260-hp Base Motor long block just arrived from Michigan Motorz !!

Ben
Ben

June 21st, 2017, 4:56 pm #91

Got my exhaust installed with the pressure regulator valves.
Have to hook up fuel, main water feed, plug wires, dipstick assembly, belts, PCV, mechanical refundant water and oil pressure hardware, a little wiring, voltage regulator, add oil, top up the transmission fluid, and ready to make some noise.

EDIT COMMENT The routing of water from the thermostat to the upper part of the riser, as shown in this photo, proved to be a bad choice, because very little water was routed to the riser until the thermostat opened up and then it was hot water. I observed the riser getting hot before the boat was ever put in the water, and changed this around. Instead of having the water from the transmission cooler be diverted to waste into the copper pipe, I routed it to the top of the riser, and then wasted the hot water coming from the thermostat into the copper exhaust pipe. Look at later photos in this thread to see how that was done, and it works great, everything stays nice and cool.












Regsrds,
Paul
Hi Paul,

This project looks great and is very well documented. Lots of great info here - thanks!

I am in the process of replacing my exhasut manifolds with similar models to what you have here. It wasn't until I removed the old log style manifolds that I realized the top alternator mount was the manifold endcap. So now I am facing the alternator bracket problem that it seems you did as well. Did you simply cut and add that extender to one of the off the shelf universal brackets? Do you have any other tips for someone facing this issue?

Thanks for any help or advice and keep up the great work here!

Ben B
'65 CCC 27'
"Captain Jack"
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Joined: September 11th, 2010, 12:38 pm

June 23rd, 2017, 11:34 am #92

The beauty of eBay is you can shop for various props, find the one that works, and sell the ones that don't.

The top prop is the 13x15 cupped that was too much. The one under it is 13x14 cupped and a little different blade design. I decided to try a 13x13 (no cup) next time out, can't wait for another good day!! It should allow me to exceed redline but I just wanted to give it a try for a data baseline.



Regards,
Paul
Paul,
So what is the verdict?

Regards
Rich
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Paul
Paul

June 23rd, 2017, 12:43 pm #93

Hi Paul,

This project looks great and is very well documented. Lots of great info here - thanks!

I am in the process of replacing my exhasut manifolds with similar models to what you have here. It wasn't until I removed the old log style manifolds that I realized the top alternator mount was the manifold endcap. So now I am facing the alternator bracket problem that it seems you did as well. Did you simply cut and add that extender to one of the off the shelf universal brackets? Do you have any other tips for someone facing this issue?

Thanks for any help or advice and keep up the great work here!

Ben B
'65 CCC 27'
"Captain Jack"
Hi Ben,

This was a learning experience for me but like most of my projects, I didn't really know all of what it would take to get it done but I knew it was going to get done one way or another, and it wasn't going to fix itself.

The removal of the iron exhaust logs will, as you noted, remove the place where the stock alternator hooks up. Therefore, the alternator must be located somewhere else, and there are a variety of choices, some put the alternator on the lower port side, and some put it on the upper starboard side, etc. I chose the lower port location because that's where the original location was, which makes a nice visual looking engine but put the alternator down where it was very tough to get to. Not much need to get to it, but it was tight.

It was so tight, I had to actually cut off one of the external ears on the alternator in order for it to be able to rotate enough to tighten the belt. The stock GM block has places for the variety of alternator brackets to fit, but on my application once I got the piece bolted on and the alternator installed, it would not rotate much due to the fact that it hit an engine stringer. The Skiff has the stringers pretty close and tight to the motor and it is dropped down into the hull making the stringers pretty high and in the way. The skiff 1966 model used a wood stringer spanning between two fiberglass pedestals, later models went with an all fiberglass setup like Commanders use.

There are many many alternator bracket choices available for a GM alternator installation. I am not sure all of them have the same curvature to hold the same size alternator, but I discovered the original alternator was too big to fit. The bracket I chose was a generic piece, and it "almost" worked out of the box. On a motor, "almost working" is not quite what you are looking for and I had to (beliee it or not) cut the main curved arm of the alternator and splice in two supporting pieces with bolts in order to widen the curve to fit the larger marine alternator. Therefore I have a modified alternatar and modified alternator bracket.

On your application, you might take a look at the upper location, it might be easier to get to and work on. I will say, that bracket took me quite a bit of time on a grinder and with a hack saw, to fabricate the splice pieces and get them to also conform to the curve, etc. Everything was primed and painted Eastwood bright aluminum.

During my project I found the grinder wheel was one of the pieces of equipment I used a lot, fabricating pieces and cleaning up cut copper edges, etc.

Good luck on your project, It may take some creative engineering depending on your clearances, etc.

Regards,
Paul
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Paul
Paul

June 23rd, 2017, 12:52 pm #94



Here is the photo I was looking for. It shows a splice I had to put in the bracket to make it just wide enough to fit the original alternator and work with. If you look at the photo, note the open (unused) bolt hole on the lower right of the alternator. My clearance was so tight I had to actually cut that off, lol.

Regards,
Paul
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Ben
Ben

June 25th, 2017, 1:20 pm #95

Hi Paul,

Thanks for the info! I was able to cobble something similar toghether. I also have the small area between the stringer and exhast manifold to squeeze the alternator in - it was definately a challenge but keeping the alternator more out of sight was a plus for me.

Thanks!

Ben

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Joined: April 23rd, 2016, 11:23 am

June 13th, 2018, 5:58 pm #96

Hey Paul,
I need an update on your SeaSkiff.
About a year ago I was re powering a 23 Commander when you were doing the same to your Skiff.
If you recall I had a timing issue. Fast forward to today, My motor spent the winter at the local speed shop and I got it back last week featuring a new cam, heads and an Edelbrock air gap manifold now with 325 Hp and 450 ft lbs of torque.
I have been in touch with Michigan Wheel and their recommendation for my package is a 13D X10P with a heavy cup to keep the RPMs around 5000. What size prop ended up working for you?

Craig Wilson
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