(Tavares)...............Are we there yet ?

(Tavares)...............Are we there yet ?

Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 3:42 am

March 26th, 2015, 10:18 pm #1

Looking forward to Tavares postings
Last edited by FEfinaticP on April 1st, 2015, 1:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

March 27th, 2015, 1:22 pm #2

Sitting on an upstairs patio having coffee now, getting ready to strive over to check everything out in an hour or two !
We have a Cobra reserved for some special duty, more on that later. !!

Our young traveling companion is still in the sack, ha!




Regards
Paul
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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 11:36 am

March 27th, 2015, 1:37 pm #3

It's clear to see why folks like Brian Gagnon are pushing for a new generation of members to be involved.Looking forward to hearing more on that angle from a major show like this one.
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Joined: May 20th, 2011, 7:30 pm

March 27th, 2015, 5:51 pm #4

Excellent observation Mr. Judge. Unless some things change for the better, alot of their kids may simply wind up with estate items that they may or may not give a hoot about. That can translate into fetching less than good prices which in turn can depress an entire market that gets on a downward spiral. On the other hand if there were a thriving audience of new enthusiasts, it would be a different matter. Of course we're not in it for the money but the sport and hobby so I'm sure we'd all like to see these boats be more than a bookmark in American manufacturing but rather transcend that to a level reserved for truly special representations of their era deserving of preservation.

Happy Friday Forum Followers!

Skol!
Craig L
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Joined: March 1st, 2015, 7:47 pm

March 27th, 2015, 6:24 pm #5

Interesting observations. Unfortunately, I think the economics of the current times don't help either. Younger generations seem to have a lot less disposable income. We have people retiring with mortgages and credit card debt at the highest rates in history. Those aren't good signs for hobbies like this. A good time for collectors (buyers) though.

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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 11:36 am

March 27th, 2015, 9:43 pm #6

What disturbs me about the aging trend goes beyond just boats being bought and sold. With respect to restorations and wood boats specifically, the talents and knowledge required to master the techniques really can't be taught in a book or website. These are things that are handed down from generation to generation and without the younger folks being in the shops learning the ropes, the old timers simply have nobody to pass their skills and know how down to.
I remember a couple years back going to a local guy who was known around the world for repairing old stereo equipment and turntables specifically. I brought an old Dual table to him for repair and was shocked when I walked into his shop. He had boxes of stereos and turntables shipped to him from all over the world. Some had been there for over a year. He explained that boxes just showed up UPS every day without so much of a phone call first. He's a one man show. Not by design, because no matter what he did he simply couldn't find anyone who wanted to work as an apprentice and learn the trade. He said "I don't know who's going to fix all this stuff when I retire". Here was a guy who had a going profitable business with a year of backlog and he couldn't retire or sell the business at any price.
So many industries are facing this crisis. X-box and smart phones have replaced screwdrivers and the ability to read a wiring schematic.
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Joined: August 9th, 2013, 2:33 pm

March 27th, 2015, 10:43 pm #7

My father (77 Yr old) has a Ford Model A, his pride and joy. His Uncle had one and as a kid he thought that was a cool car. I look at this museum quality car and think it needs to be chopped, dropped and a small block Chevy dropped in. The car is worth about 1/2 of what it was worth 25 years ago since 1/2 of the people who remember that car as cool are no longer driving.

Give me a 65 Mustang, 67 Camero, 70 442 or 1969 Commander 19. That is what was cool when I was a kid and I (and 76 million other boomers) have a little more coin than we did 40 years ago and are buying these at outrageous prices that will fall as we become too old to drive them. None of that matters because we just enjoy these boats and our time working on them and enjoying them while reliving our youthful dreams.

As an investment my question is what will my son and others the same age want in 25 years when he is 45 has a little coin to spend and wants to relive his youth. I don't see him wanting a mint Xbox 360 or classic iphone 6 but If I could figure that out and purchase a few of what these kids will want (remember when a 68 convertible firebird could be had for <$1000 in 1979) My retirement could go very well.

What is it that todays kids will want to spend their money on in 2040?

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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 3:42 am

March 27th, 2015, 11:24 pm #8

Looking forward to Tavares postings
Okay, so the younger part of the crew slept in, probably because she was up past 9, probably with JP cruising the docks while our moderator caught up on some Z's. So, the question is, will we be kept informed on a day today basis? Or will we be kept in suspense while the crew and their fearless leader soak it all in. I hope for the former as there is only so much basketball I can stand , knowing there is fresh varnish curing and Coppertone glistening in the Florida sun....

CW, Land locked for now!
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

March 28th, 2015, 12:46 am #9

Looking forward to Tavares postings



Originally sold to Switzerland, restored in Switzerland w maple inlay at seams !!




Original except electric chokes.


Here ya go !!!!!!! Cadillac !








More later, phone service here is very poor !

Regards
Paul, Janet, Helene




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Joined: March 1st, 2015, 7:47 pm

March 28th, 2015, 12:46 am #10

My father (77 Yr old) has a Ford Model A, his pride and joy. His Uncle had one and as a kid he thought that was a cool car. I look at this museum quality car and think it needs to be chopped, dropped and a small block Chevy dropped in. The car is worth about 1/2 of what it was worth 25 years ago since 1/2 of the people who remember that car as cool are no longer driving.

Give me a 65 Mustang, 67 Camero, 70 442 or 1969 Commander 19. That is what was cool when I was a kid and I (and 76 million other boomers) have a little more coin than we did 40 years ago and are buying these at outrageous prices that will fall as we become too old to drive them. None of that matters because we just enjoy these boats and our time working on them and enjoying them while reliving our youthful dreams.

As an investment my question is what will my son and others the same age want in 25 years when he is 45 has a little coin to spend and wants to relive his youth. I don't see him wanting a mint Xbox 360 or classic iphone 6 but If I could figure that out and purchase a few of what these kids will want (remember when a 68 convertible firebird could be had for <$1000 in 1979) My retirement could go very well.

What is it that todays kids will want to spend their money on in 2040?
So true Jay! Probably because I have a 17 y/o step-daughter who doesn't seem to be passionate about anything! And I don't think it's just her, it's a lot of the kids her age. Maybe I'm just getting to that age where where I start to say tings like that, but I don't remember it being that way for me. We all had hobbies and could name a few things we were really passionate about. My problem has always been too many hobbies/interests.

Craig brings up an interesting point...there are fewer people acquiring the skills needed for hobbies like these. Listening to talk radio the other day I heard them mention how poorly the "box stores" are doing in Europe because there has been such a decline in do-it-yourselfer's. Perhaps it's, like he said, a lack of mentorship. Perhaps it's just different interests. I will say, I have one employee who's 26 and he is actually buying old turntables and tube amps. Fun to see his reaction when he hears how good "true analog" sounds. I think if you are over 35 you know how good audio can sound, but these younger adults have been raised on compressed garbage and don't know the difference. I think all the digital is creating a bit of an analog revolution in these younger generations.

...sorry - totally off into the weeds. I thought we were talking about boats.
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