Photos of my 1968 corsair sea v 20 inboard project

Photos of my 1968 corsair sea v 20 inboard project

Joined: November 18th, 2013, 3:13 pm

November 22nd, 2013, 5:30 pm #1

More pictures.


























edit comment: Title revised to draw attention to the subject.
Last edited by FEfinaticP on September 17th, 2017, 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

November 22nd, 2013, 8:46 pm #2

Well that cut on the transom is interesting. Lapping the right roving and fabric with a good saturation of resin can bring it back in good shape. I trust you found some rotted plywood used to reinforce the transom.

I see a nice reinforced windshield here, with the lower operable sections. That's a better design than my Skiff with the whole window opening, becuase it wants to flex more. I also see chromed intake scoops, where my Skiff has built in fiberglass intake scoops, but still has aft exhaust chromed scoops like yours. I also see a big floor lever, how cool is THAT, so the side throttle lever is just for throttle. Very cool.

Regards,

Paul

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Joined: November 18th, 2013, 3:13 pm

December 2nd, 2013, 2:32 pm #3

New floors and such














I'll have some more this week. Getting close to the end of the project. Love this boat, can't wait to see how she cruises.
Last edited by FEfinaticP on September 17th, 2017, 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

December 2nd, 2013, 2:49 pm #4

Hey looking good.

I love the old style lever for the transmission. The flywheel forward 283 used a transmission that was well suited to that system. Makes it so easy to manuver at the docks because you can pull back just enough to slip the bands a bit. With my system it is almost always IN or OUT fully, no slipping for control purposes with the fully huydraulic. That happens to be the exact same part I have on a 1956 Chris-Craft, which is probably the exact same part found on some other much older boats.

So help me here, I don't see engine stringers, and I can't remember if we had this discussion or whether it was with some other boat owner. I do know the later series Corsair moved from the early series wood engine stringer I have in my 1966 20-foot Corsair Division Sea Skiff, which was prone to cracking, but later changed to an all fiberglass system that was much more secure over the long term. Either you have the later fiberglass system or your engine stringers are gone.



Work looks very familiar to me, and looks like fun. Enjoy the journey, it's a big part of the fun.

regards,

Paul
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Joined: November 18th, 2013, 3:13 pm

December 2nd, 2013, 6:53 pm #5

The engine mounts to the main 2 fiberglass stingers running down each side of the center line. I had to cut out the rear mounting locations due to extreme rot and rust. The mounts were made of a 1/2 in. steel plate sandwiched in between plywood, I made new ones and glassed them in place. When the engine went in these plates were then drilled and tapped. I used 1/2 in. stainless bolts to anchor it down. Here's a couple engine pics and the finished repair on her rotted rear. Also a picture of that not so common jabsco water pump.



















Last edited by FEfinaticP on September 17th, 2017, 1:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

December 2nd, 2013, 8:26 pm #6

Man that motor mount died a horrible death x 2. It was over-tightened and that is a big NO NO for that style mount whether it is iron or aluminum, they will break. They are only intended to be snugged, not tightened so tight as to pinch the rubber. The iron wedge used with the aluminum mount didn't fare very well either, sheesh.

Hey the motor looks great. It is very similar to the H motor I have but this one has some obvious upgrades in plumbing (mine has no risers), alternator (my generator is driven on the same belt/shaft as the Sherwood 4-port pump), fuel filtration looks good. I can't tell but I suspect you have an iron wedge under that carb.

Good confirmation on the fiberglass stringers. You were spared (by evolution) of the problem wood stringers.

All said and done, that is a fine engine for a boat this size. Will sound awesome and push the boat just fine.

regards,

Paul
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 10:31 pm

December 4th, 2013, 10:25 pm #7

Mark --

I couldn't resist chiming in on your great postings and photos. You're blasting through this project like a man on a mission -- and that's exactly what you are with these wonderful little boats. Great detail work, by the way. Nothing seems to faze you. It's clear you have one of those unusual "northern climate" heat-riser diaphragm things on the front of your motor, just like mine. The Harpur Marine guy tells me they didn't work and Chris Craft quickly discontinued them. Mine is still on my engine and causes no problems, so I don't mess with it. (Assuming they're new, as they seem to be, it also looks like you had no problem procuring those two oddball 3/4" molded hoses that jump over the alternator and similar on the port side.)

Congrats on your find and your great workmanship.

Regards,

Cliff
'68 Corsair Sea V
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Joined: October 29th, 2013, 2:58 pm

December 9th, 2013, 9:13 pm #8

Hey Mark- This looks like a great project and a fun boat. I replaced all the floor structure in my boat except the area from the rear-facing seat under the foredeck. That was plywood and looked great except someone cut a 12" dia. hole thru it to gain access to forward bilge pump plumbing. I wound up taking a scrap of plywood of the same thickness, driving a screw into the center of the scrap to use for a hand-hold, slipped it through the hole and pulled it up tight against the hole where I marked it, then curt a nice fitting piece the exact shape of the hole out on my scroll saw and Gorilla Gluing it into place. After it was sanded and painted you couldn't tell it was repaired. Everything from their back was replaced in oak, mahogany and Hydro-tek marine plywood. It's a process but like George Zimmerman used to say at Men's Wearhouse "You're going to like the way you look" when you are done. Great job on a nice boat.

Dave

Just to the right of the storage locker was an irregular about 12" dia. hole that looked like something you might expect to see in an outhouse LOL. My repair is right under that speeder wrench.








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Joined: November 18th, 2013, 3:13 pm

December 10th, 2013, 3:39 am #9

Dave, great boat, great workmanship, love the mahogany. It's quite a process but I think it's well worth it.
It's great to see other classics back on the water. What a great ride that boat must be and I'm sure the sound
turns some heads. Thanks for the pics.

Mark
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Paul
Paul

December 10th, 2013, 4:42 pm #10

Some of us have had the pleasure of doing the restoration and then running the boat, both are a lot of fun, and you have something to look forward to when your project goes in the water.

The biggest water we've been on has been out on Old Hickory Lake here in Tennessee, which is a large lake and it can have some pretty significant swells to deal with during heavy cruiser traffic, and of course during windy weather too. The hull has a great ride, but it is not an offshore racer. It has it's limits of course but it's a nice cushion and a very dry ride.

I spoke with one man by phone one evening, who I have forgotten his name due to the passage of many years, who said he had one on one of the Great Lakes, and had it out in six foot seas. I remember his quote however, and he said he would put the rpm at 1900 and just let the hull do its job, cresting the swell. This would be the preferred method to jamming the throttles and busting through, all the while busting stringers, engine mounts, and your bank account. It may be possible to do that with the 24-degree Lancer, but not with the 16-degree Corsair. Even with 16-degrees, Chris-Craft referred to this one as a "deep V" hull.

In any case, very interesting model, we love ours, it gets lots of looks everywhere we go. People drive up and roll the window down and yell "we LOVE your boat" !!



You're going to love the way you look in it, Dave, Cliff, George, and I guarantee it.

Here are some videos I took of our Skiff in action. The boat rides bow high, so you will either need trim tabs or perhaps add some fixed tabs to set the hull where you like to run. You will note on one video I was standing up to get a good view ahead, checking for any debris, etc. The sound of our boat should be virtually identical to yours. One thing for sure, they SOUND vintage because they ARE vintage !!!

Running on Cumberland River, Old Hickory Lake, Tennessee
http://www.youtube.com/embed/2ApwasE-qRI

Start up at Commodore Yacht Club, Cumberland River, Cheatham Lake, Tennessee
http://www.youtube.com/embed/aBM8B0feNLc

Taking off in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp, Cumberland River, Cheatham Lake, Tennessee
http://www.youtube.com/embed/fExajnBvUhI

Going slow on Old Hickory Lake near Cedar Creek Yacht Club.
http://www.youtube.com/embed/YTueLeIOmF8?rel=0

Part of the fun,.


regards,

Paul



Last edited by FEfinaticP on December 10th, 2013, 4:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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