* Old Girl Getting new life.

* Old Girl Getting new life.

Greg42sf
Greg42sf

January 15th, 2012, 5:10 am #1

My girl is sick! She started pukeing up white smoke at an idle while at temperature. That is not good. I have old 871 tti detroits in her gut. Last October the transmission went on the port side. Allison gears are not being made anymore. I fixed her with a 25 year old gear. Re sealed and pressure plates of course. The day we test drove her she was acting up. The results are in. 6 cylinders with broken rings. ( for those who know) there is no cross hatching anywhere in this motor. 3 cylinders with heavy scratching, one cylinder looks like it was sand blasted. O yea one cylinder is soaked in oil. Apparently that is what happens when the head cracks. What is truly amazing is that I ran it home. It still runs. Wow! What else can I ask of her anyway 1978 4500 hours never been majored. That is 34 years old !

We live in a disposable world. I can buy Cummins new factory remans with a transmission for the quote of the rebuild. Of course the Cummins is not installed. Well it looks like I am going to have a busy winter and spring. Repower time.!!1 I am going to put a new heart and soul into the old girl. I will keep posting the progress. My best goal is to be in for the 4th of July. Ok guys start taking bets and put 100 on me. Wait a minute I need that 100. Donation will be gladly taken. Ha!

I will try to post the progress and all the pain and tears. Major surgery comming up.
Last spring I took off the old windsheild on the bridge and put up Costa glass. check it out.




Got to go fishing this summer What a Blast!! 65lb long fin tuna.










Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 15th, 2012, 8:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

January 16th, 2012, 1:59 pm #2

Hi Greg,

That is a real beauty, and it is good to see you landing all that tuna too, because it is evidence the boat is doing what it was intended to do, and it is also evidence you are having a blast. (and eating well too)


There are several awesome repowering threads documented here on The Forum, some with diesel, some with gas. Your 42 TF could go either way. As you may have seen, PARAMOUNT (47 Commander, Vancouver) recently received a pair of big GM gas motors and it runs quite well. My preference for the TF, however, is diesel simply because of the intended use of these boats for offshore use and being out in big water, running out to the canyon and back.

Good luck, all that work you put into the upper helm station is still going to look great. Keep us posted with your progress.

best,

Paul
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Greg Kay
Greg Kay

January 30th, 2012, 5:06 am #3

Step 1 engine selection. I found running take outs Cummins 8cta 450 (430 hp) from a boat builder. Evans Boats out of Maryland. They are 3 years old with some hours but they are only 3 years old. Passed the engine survey with flying colors.

I took them on a test drive in a 50 boat today. Nice to be on the water. These engines pushed her at 27k on calm day. Mine is only 42. That gave me a boost to get ready for the work ahead. I am excited. Reached wot rpm. Power tested each engine at full throttle individually and they were only 25 rpm off. Good power. No temp creeps.

Starbord

port


The math and the prop calculators say at 2200 rpm 24k curse. ( 2600 rpm wot) .13.6 gph each 27 gph total. That should give me a 1.04 gpm. Wow 1 gallon per mile. I only get .56 gpm now going 19k. If I drop the rpm down to 1800rpm I should get 18k and 1.2gpm. All this math is based on a prop calculator from boatdeisel.com and engine posted fuel consumption at these rpms. When I am done I will post the results. So you heard it here first. Only time will tell.

Step 2 Gears new ZF 280 a irm gears with a 2.25 to 1 ratio. This will allow me to swing the 29 X 34 props I currently have on 2 shafts.

Step 3 remove all the stuff in the boat. Remove the floors. Unbolt the motors. Disconnect about a thousand wires, cables, and all kinds of stuff that is in the way. Remove the old insulation that is degrading. Some floor boars will have to be cut out and then replaced.


Step 4 Once everything is removed clean the bilges, Paint them, new insulation in the bilge re rout a lot of old stuff and fix anything I can will the engines are out of the way. Make new engine mounts, service engines before setting, new couplings milled to shafts. You know that iceberg saying ? It applies here. There are about 3.2 million things that will be done at this stage before setting the engines.

Step 5 test fit tranys, set engine, align the power train, Tweak props if necessary.

Step 6 Hook up the electrical and cabling to the engines.

Step 7 to 1000 I will get to later.

The work begins this weekend. Bring it on.


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Paul
Paul

January 30th, 2012, 10:52 pm #4

Whoa Nelly, a pair of 430-horse engines would sure make my 38 Express stand up and run like a runabout! Keep us posted on the install, the older our boats get, the more and more of us will be faced with repowering or rebuilds. We have some great threads here in the archives now that have been shared world-wide, and I hope you have been able to refer to them and get some support for taking on a huge task like this.

best,

Paul
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Joined: December 13th, 2007, 6:09 pm

February 1st, 2012, 4:38 am #5

Step 1 engine selection. I found running take outs Cummins 8cta 450 (430 hp) from a boat builder. Evans Boats out of Maryland. They are 3 years old with some hours but they are only 3 years old. Passed the engine survey with flying colors.

I took them on a test drive in a 50 boat today. Nice to be on the water. These engines pushed her at 27k on calm day. Mine is only 42. That gave me a boost to get ready for the work ahead. I am excited. Reached wot rpm. Power tested each engine at full throttle individually and they were only 25 rpm off. Good power. No temp creeps.

Starbord

port


The math and the prop calculators say at 2200 rpm 24k curse. ( 2600 rpm wot) .13.6 gph each 27 gph total. That should give me a 1.04 gpm. Wow 1 gallon per mile. I only get .56 gpm now going 19k. If I drop the rpm down to 1800rpm I should get 18k and 1.2gpm. All this math is based on a prop calculator from boatdeisel.com and engine posted fuel consumption at these rpms. When I am done I will post the results. So you heard it here first. Only time will tell.

Step 2 Gears new ZF 280 a irm gears with a 2.25 to 1 ratio. This will allow me to swing the 29 X 34 props I currently have on 2 shafts.

Step 3 remove all the stuff in the boat. Remove the floors. Unbolt the motors. Disconnect about a thousand wires, cables, and all kinds of stuff that is in the way. Remove the old insulation that is degrading. Some floor boars will have to be cut out and then replaced.


Step 4 Once everything is removed clean the bilges, Paint them, new insulation in the bilge re rout a lot of old stuff and fix anything I can will the engines are out of the way. Make new engine mounts, service engines before setting, new couplings milled to shafts. You know that iceberg saying ? It applies here. There are about 3.2 million things that will be done at this stage before setting the engines.

Step 5 test fit tranys, set engine, align the power train, Tweak props if necessary.

Step 6 Hook up the electrical and cabling to the engines.

Step 7 to 1000 I will get to later.

The work begins this weekend. Bring it on.

Hi Greg,
Sorry to hear about the Detroits. They are robust engines to say the least. I ran a 671N for an entire summer thinking I just needed rings. When I tore it down, pieces of the lower half of one of the pistons was laying in the oil pan!
The Cummins are a good find. There was a 1980's 42' Commander out here in California that had Cummins 450C's in it. I seem to recall it achieved the numbers you are anticipating. Hey if you really want to get into it, there are the QSM11's, but then again I tend to over do things. Looking forward to your next post.

John Austin
45' Commander TF 8v71TI's
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Joined: April 17th, 2006, 9:02 pm

February 5th, 2012, 1:31 pm #6

My girl is sick! She started pukeing up white smoke at an idle while at temperature. That is not good. I have old 871 tti detroits in her gut. Last October the transmission went on the port side. Allison gears are not being made anymore. I fixed her with a 25 year old gear. Re sealed and pressure plates of course. The day we test drove her she was acting up. The results are in. 6 cylinders with broken rings. ( for those who know) there is no cross hatching anywhere in this motor. 3 cylinders with heavy scratching, one cylinder looks like it was sand blasted. O yea one cylinder is soaked in oil. Apparently that is what happens when the head cracks. What is truly amazing is that I ran it home. It still runs. Wow! What else can I ask of her anyway 1978 4500 hours never been majored. That is 34 years old !

We live in a disposable world. I can buy Cummins new factory remans with a transmission for the quote of the rebuild. Of course the Cummins is not installed. Well it looks like I am going to have a busy winter and spring. Repower time.!!1 I am going to put a new heart and soul into the old girl. I will keep posting the progress. My best goal is to be in for the 4th of July. Ok guys start taking bets and put 100 on me. Wait a minute I need that 100. Donation will be gladly taken. Ha!

I will try to post the progress and all the pain and tears. Major surgery comming up.
Last spring I took off the old windsheild on the bridge and put up Costa glass. check it out.




Got to go fishing this summer What a Blast!! 65lb long fin tuna.









Greg,

For a couple years I have been wanting to rid Bella of her 6-92's. They are still very sound engines and do the job nicely, but I want some more power and speed. So I am anxiously awaiting your progress and results. If all goes well, I will run the DD's this summer and look for ample re power install next winter. Can anyone say IPS!

Keep us posted

Terry
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Greg 42sf
Greg 42sf

February 6th, 2012, 5:27 am #7

Step 1 engine selection. I found running take outs Cummins 8cta 450 (430 hp) from a boat builder. Evans Boats out of Maryland. They are 3 years old with some hours but they are only 3 years old. Passed the engine survey with flying colors.

I took them on a test drive in a 50 boat today. Nice to be on the water. These engines pushed her at 27k on calm day. Mine is only 42. That gave me a boost to get ready for the work ahead. I am excited. Reached wot rpm. Power tested each engine at full throttle individually and they were only 25 rpm off. Good power. No temp creeps.

Starbord

port


The math and the prop calculators say at 2200 rpm 24k curse. ( 2600 rpm wot) .13.6 gph each 27 gph total. That should give me a 1.04 gpm. Wow 1 gallon per mile. I only get .56 gpm now going 19k. If I drop the rpm down to 1800rpm I should get 18k and 1.2gpm. All this math is based on a prop calculator from boatdeisel.com and engine posted fuel consumption at these rpms. When I am done I will post the results. So you heard it here first. Only time will tell.

Step 2 Gears new ZF 280 a irm gears with a 2.25 to 1 ratio. This will allow me to swing the 29 X 34 props I currently have on 2 shafts.

Step 3 remove all the stuff in the boat. Remove the floors. Unbolt the motors. Disconnect about a thousand wires, cables, and all kinds of stuff that is in the way. Remove the old insulation that is degrading. Some floor boars will have to be cut out and then replaced.


Step 4 Once everything is removed clean the bilges, Paint them, new insulation in the bilge re rout a lot of old stuff and fix anything I can will the engines are out of the way. Make new engine mounts, service engines before setting, new couplings milled to shafts. You know that iceberg saying ? It applies here. There are about 3.2 million things that will be done at this stage before setting the engines.

Step 5 test fit tranys, set engine, align the power train, Tweak props if necessary.

Step 6 Hook up the electrical and cabling to the engines.

Step 7 to 1000 I will get to later.

The work begins this weekend. Bring it on.

Step 3

I for got to take a current pic of the peace and tranquility of the boat before the bomb went off. I was pleased to see the opening in the floor easily came up. I have full access to the engine room. I have never opened it up this far before. All work is normally done below decks or with the center section left in. One thing I did not expect was the with of the engines. I have a 33.5inch door opening and engines that are 52 wide in girth. That would be great if it were a fish. So time to put these old girls on a diet. Guys call all of your ladies, this is a crash course on how to fit into their favorite jeans. I hope they will not miss a few body parts.
Two days of pain. Everything on these girls had to be taken off. Everything is so dam heavy too. The starter has to weigh 75 pounds. Things removed Manifolds and the studs, turbos, exhaust, shaft couplers, starters, alternators, and a bunch of coolant piping. Another thing I did not take into consideration is the re capturing of 30 gal of coolant inside these old girls. There is a pile of old parts on the back deck now. I did not have the energy to get them off the boat today. Have to leave some work for next week. Ha Ha.
I also built the temp walls for the support of the rigging to lift the engines out.

Old photo Peace and tranquility


Fatladies


Slim ladies ready for removal

Walls for support

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Paul
Paul

February 6th, 2012, 6:21 am #8

Would be quite the feat to install one of those bad boys in a runabout. The weight would most likely be too much for the 23 but what about an open 27 ? That's a heck of a lot of iron!

Best,

Paul
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Greg 42sf
Greg 42sf

February 7th, 2012, 12:24 am #9

Greg,

For a couple years I have been wanting to rid Bella of her 6-92's. They are still very sound engines and do the job nicely, but I want some more power and speed. So I am anxiously awaiting your progress and results. If all goes well, I will run the DD's this summer and look for ample re power install next winter. Can anyone say IPS!

Keep us posted

Terry
Ips now that would be sweet. Till I looked at the price tag. Too much re designing of the hull and my new fuel tanks in the way. No reason to ever repower unless you need to. Repairs are almost always the way to go. I just found my self at a point where the amount of money i had to spend to simply fix the power plants I have was 85% of replacemnt. No brainer for me. I Say keep the girls running as long as possible. When they dont. Then decide what is best for you.
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Joined: April 17th, 2006, 9:02 pm

February 7th, 2012, 11:48 am #10

No doubt the IPS are expensive and that is a consideration. But, if a couple events go my way - well, they may be in my future.
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