* My fuel injected 468 cubic inch FE rebuild for 38 Commander LADY DI

* My fuel injected 468 cubic inch FE rebuild for 38 Commander LADY DI

Randy
Randy

February 14th, 2012, 4:57 pm #1




Randy
Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Randy
Randy

February 14th, 2012, 5:02 pm #2














New Air Conditioning




New Water system


New Westerbeke




Randy





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Randy
Randy

February 14th, 2012, 5:07 pm #3

Paul,

I have been following your project on the forum and thought I would send you an update on mine. We are putting the finishing touches on the 468 FEi big dogs (something I made up, i for injected). I have attached a couple of in-process pictures of them. I am waiting impatiently for warmer weather so I can run it again.

The bottom of the boat has been blasted and is in the process of getting the Interlux 2000E Interprotect system applied. I have many pictures of the condition of the bottom gelcoat I can share. It concerned me after the 40+ years of paint was blasted off. The boat must have had a substandard blister repair job performed many years prior to 1999 when I bought it. I looked good until recently when the filler used was starting to pop out. There was evidence of many small and large blisters, but the moisture level was low.

If anyone is interested in a set of stainless steel water tubes for their 427 like the ones shown in the pictures let me know, I have two sets of the raw water cooling versions copper tubes to use as patterns. We have the material and hydraulic benders to make them up. The gear reduction starters work and sound great; however beware, they needed a little rework to get the clocking correct to fit between the exhaust manifold and the stringer of the 38 commander. We can supply them with the required modifications if anyone is interested. Once you have the mounting base correct, starter removal/replacement is easy. The stainless rear door panels we made look good too.

Randy



















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Joined: July 11th, 2006, 8:59 pm

February 14th, 2012, 9:27 pm #4




Randy
What kind of fuel injection?
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Paul
Paul

February 14th, 2012, 10:22 pm #5




Randy
Randy,

Very impressive workmanship. When I see a motor like this and it looks simple it is no accident. Someone worked hard to get them looking this nice and functional, very professional looking job.

I am curious about what you did to the motor, regarding bore and stroke, to get the 468 cubes, what you are using for compression ratio, etc. I saw the note that you converted these motors from solid lifters to hydraulic, and that is of interest to me too just to know what work was necessary and why you did this. This is quite an amazing pair of big FE motors, can't say I have ever heard of anyone ever doing the fuel injection on this motor.

Have you actually run the boat with this setup now, what kind of torque are you looking at, what props are you using, and what oil do you fry your chicken in..........inquiring minds want to know!

Best,

Paul
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Randy B
Randy B

February 14th, 2012, 10:28 pm #6

What kind of fuel injection?
The systems I installed are the Holley Commander 950-52 model. It is a 700 CFM throttle body style that has four injectors and a progressive linkage. The linkage opens the rear two throttle plates and fires the rear injectors where you program it much like a four-barrel carb. The throttle body bolts right on the CC 427 manifold. I blocked the exhaust crossovers in my intakes to keep the manifold cool. The ECM is potted in silicone for the marine application. We made custom brackets for the throttle cable and MAP sensor since the original won't fit over the IAC. The fuel pressure is 21 psi from the factory but can be adjusted. I increased the tank fuel pickups to 1/2" and plumbed fuel returns to each tank. You can program fuel enrichment based on engine and ambient temperature and manifold pressure for instant starts and smooth idle at any temperature. You do not have to touch the throttle to start them.

If any one is interested in going this route, I will share my fuel maps/programs and can supply the other parts needed to install them on a 427. My wiring harnesses have been custom fit to the motors. I plan to do a little write-up with pictures and performance data once it warms up enough to go play. My dad used to do field tech support and installation for Holley's marine fuel injection systems, which helped.

Randy
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Randy
Randy

February 14th, 2012, 10:54 pm #7

Randy,

Very impressive workmanship. When I see a motor like this and it looks simple it is no accident. Someone worked hard to get them looking this nice and functional, very professional looking job.

I am curious about what you did to the motor, regarding bore and stroke, to get the 468 cubes, what you are using for compression ratio, etc. I saw the note that you converted these motors from solid lifters to hydraulic, and that is of interest to me too just to know what work was necessary and why you did this. This is quite an amazing pair of big FE motors, can't say I have ever heard of anyone ever doing the fuel injection on this motor.

Have you actually run the boat with this setup now, what kind of torque are you looking at, what props are you using, and what oil do you fry your chicken in..........inquiring minds want to know!

Best,

Paul
1) Scat 4.125" stroker crankshafts and connecting rods for Ford 427 FE

2) 0.020" overbore on the stock blocks 4.230" bore to straighten up the cylinders = 4.250" diameter

3) 8 x (4.250/2)squared x 3.14 x 4.125" = 468 cubic inches

The dished top pistons were custom made by Diamond to achieve a theroretical 9.8:1 compression ratio. Not off the shelf items.

I ran out of time and weather so I have only ran them on the ground and in the boat under no load. I went with hydraulic lifters to be able to tweak the cam profile a little to better fit the new engine configuration and to also to do away with the annual adjustment required for the solid lifters, 214-214-114 profile. These won't turn enough RPMs to have to worry about floating valves/lifters. I am going to start with my 23x23 four blades and see what happens. My boat already has 1 1/2" shafts. More than anything I am hoping for better fuel efficiency at 3,800-4,000 RPM where the hull really starts planing and cruising nicely. The engines won't be working as hard to achieve that RPM. No replacement for displacement when the fuel supply we are being force to use goes to hell.

I will post performance data soon. The bottom is being worked over now and the boat should go back in the water around March 1.

Randy
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Steve
Steve

February 14th, 2012, 11:20 pm #8

Paul,

I have been following your project on the forum and thought I would send you an update on mine. We are putting the finishing touches on the 468 FEi big dogs (something I made up, i for injected). I have attached a couple of in-process pictures of them. I am waiting impatiently for warmer weather so I can run it again.

The bottom of the boat has been blasted and is in the process of getting the Interlux 2000E Interprotect system applied. I have many pictures of the condition of the bottom gelcoat I can share. It concerned me after the 40+ years of paint was blasted off. The boat must have had a substandard blister repair job performed many years prior to 1999 when I bought it. I looked good until recently when the filler used was starting to pop out. There was evidence of many small and large blisters, but the moisture level was low.

If anyone is interested in a set of stainless steel water tubes for their 427 like the ones shown in the pictures let me know, I have two sets of the raw water cooling versions copper tubes to use as patterns. We have the material and hydraulic benders to make them up. The gear reduction starters work and sound great; however beware, they needed a little rework to get the clocking correct to fit between the exhaust manifold and the stringer of the 38 commander. We can supply them with the required modifications if anyone is interested. Once you have the mounting base correct, starter removal/replacement is easy. The stainless rear door panels we made look good too.

Randy


















Randy,
Thats a gorgeous set up you have under your floorboards and its exactly what I want my 42 to end up looking like. I just haven't pulled my motors yet because they haven't given me any reason to HOWEVER, pics like that give me crazy thoughts! The grey hull and bottom insides are what I plan on and at least now I know how good they'll look.

The 468 FE is a great idea, my brother has a similar combo in his 66 Ford Cyclone with a stroked 390 and 428 crank (solid lifters I believe)and bored to a 458ci

Very cool, thanks for sharing and potentialy costing me more hard earned $$!

Steve Lendzion
'69 42' Commander
Bear Z Girl
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Gary
Gary

February 15th, 2012, 6:31 am #9

The systems I installed are the Holley Commander 950-52 model. It is a 700 CFM throttle body style that has four injectors and a progressive linkage. The linkage opens the rear two throttle plates and fires the rear injectors where you program it much like a four-barrel carb. The throttle body bolts right on the CC 427 manifold. I blocked the exhaust crossovers in my intakes to keep the manifold cool. The ECM is potted in silicone for the marine application. We made custom brackets for the throttle cable and MAP sensor since the original won't fit over the IAC. The fuel pressure is 21 psi from the factory but can be adjusted. I increased the tank fuel pickups to 1/2" and plumbed fuel returns to each tank. You can program fuel enrichment based on engine and ambient temperature and manifold pressure for instant starts and smooth idle at any temperature. You do not have to touch the throttle to start them.

If any one is interested in going this route, I will share my fuel maps/programs and can supply the other parts needed to install them on a 427. My wiring harnesses have been custom fit to the motors. I plan to do a little write-up with pictures and performance data once it warms up enough to go play. My dad used to do field tech support and installation for Holley's marine fuel injection systems, which helped.

Randy
Where did you put the O2 sensor?
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Randy B
Randy B

February 15th, 2012, 3:01 pm #10

Gary - The system can be operated in either open loop (fixed map) or closed loop (map based on O2 feedback) modes. We are starting with open loop and tuning the fuel map based on CO% and exhaust gas temperature measured with probes inserted in the 3/8 NPT ports for the choke heat tubes. I need to see if there is enough temperature for the O2 sensor to function accurately first. There are many examples of EFI systems running open loop on the market.
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