Paul
Paul

November 2nd, 2013, 3:51 pm #11

Both of you are car guys too, and your quality is the same whether is is a boat or car. That would be "high quality".
I think we have all inspired each other, because projects are sometimes ongoing, and the learning and inspiration goes around and around. Your two boats have to be among the very best of their kind. Congratulstions for keeping them in original condition.

Regards,

Paul
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Joined: December 26th, 2011, 11:12 pm

November 7th, 2013, 4:13 am #12

Thanks, Paul, for the vote of confidence. A compliment like that from someone who literally wrote the book(s) on these boats, well, I'm bowled over. And Dave, thanks, again, for your encouragement right after I bought the boat. You taught me not to be intimidated by the project, and your great craftsmanship inspired me to dive right in.

While I started with a pretty solid Corsair, I did have a few obstacles to overcome:







http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j47 ... loordemo53








Thanks, again, for your help, encouragement and guidance.

Best,
Cliff
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Paul
Paul

November 7th, 2013, 2:03 pm #13

Well since we have a mutual admiration society going here, I'll just say the inspiration factor runs pretty deep here. I was inspired when I restored my Skiff by numerous people who had presented their own spectacular work, and it made me do a better job. My job wasn't as well done as some of course, but it did make me pay extra attention and actually have more fun doing it.

So as a team here we are better than a bunch of individuals all running around with our noses in the air because we have a classic Chris Craft, haha.

Thanks guys, for the great material you have shared here on this forum, and continue to share ! It happens with all models through various threads. Even with some of the craziest postings, someone out there gets a tidbit of info they can use !! Good fun.

Regards,

Paul
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Joined: October 29th, 2013, 2:58 pm

November 7th, 2013, 3:28 pm #14

Thanks, Paul, for the vote of confidence. A compliment like that from someone who literally wrote the book(s) on these boats, well, I'm bowled over. And Dave, thanks, again, for your encouragement right after I bought the boat. You taught me not to be intimidated by the project, and your great craftsmanship inspired me to dive right in.

While I started with a pretty solid Corsair, I did have a few obstacles to overcome:







http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j47 ... loordemo53








Thanks, again, for your help, encouragement and guidance.

Best,
Cliff
is on this website. Paul DID write the book and I was honored to have my skiff show up in the book. Without Paul's input my boat would still have those ugly aftermarket seats instead of the original shop built seats. Paul sent pretty good dimensioned pictures of his original seats allowing me to duplicate the originals even though I didn't have the originals to work from. The storage under the companion seat is where all my tools and spare parts live.

I also wound up with an original looking instrument panel and clean fiberglass dash because I saw Paul's setup with the Garmin GPSMAP unit that is clamped to the dash support and can be hidden away in seconds for showing the boat like original. As a result the fiberglass dash in front of the helm is no longer cluttered with binnacle compass and fish finder, and the speedometer paddlewheel sender and sounder transducers got cleaned off the transom all from ideas I picked up from pictures of Paul's boat. That Garmin replaced the compass, fish finder/depth sounder and speedometer functions all in one unit. Paul also identified Dale Kocian as the go-to guy for instrument restoration which added a touch of class and made some pretty tired instruments look like new. Pictures of Paul's floorboard restoration helped guide me in the right direction there too. So my point is good experiences shared by others on similar boats lead to preservation of the species. The Skiff was the first boat I ever tried to restore.

Now about the windshield- I didn't get much help there LOL, just rolled up my sleeves and had at it! Oh well, sometimes you have to just go it alone I guess...

Cheers

Dave


From this...












to this. That picture standing up on the bare wood companion seat is a printout of the picture with dimensions Paul sent of his factory original seats. What a great help that was...


Now I have a place to stash my tools and spares...


Old instrument panel, wrong steering wheel. Every place you see green tape is where an unscheduled hole was drilled in the fiberglass and was being repaired. Note the collection of green tape patches right above the instrument panel in front of the helm. That's where the compass, fish finder and other items were added and whose functions were all rolled into the Garmin.


Correct steering wheel, restored instruments on the new panel. That hub cover is not correct for this boat and one day if I keep the boat I will track down the correct one but thought of all the old Chris Craft steering wheel hub emblems this one was classy.




The Garmin just clamps to the support post and plugs in. It replaces compass, depth sounder, fish locater and speedometer and adds real-time navigation mapping, route recording and can be used to locate maritime services. It can be removed and stored in seconds.




Windshield wars- how it was...






The battle...














What it is...
Last edited by dkrugler on November 7th, 2013, 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 11:36 am

November 7th, 2013, 6:01 pm #15

Looks great Dave. What was the original finish on the frame? My buddy is struggling with the 66 Lancer frame as it's quite corroded. We were able to polish a small section to a high shine but it took hours. I'm thinking painting might be an easier option but I think polished is correct. My 75' had a windshield frame that was anodized so polishing was not an option. Fortunately it just needed cleaning(probably due to being anodized).
We wet sanded, wet sanded again, steel wooled, and polished which worked but took forever. Anyone have a better method?
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Paul
Paul

November 7th, 2013, 6:18 pm #16

.........some of you would wonder if I know what a windshield is, and yes I do.

Mine, like many of the era, was pitted where the anodized finish had deteriorated.
That makes it doubly impossible to polish.

I used a chemical attack to get to the pitting in order to stop it, and then used a self etching primer.
Once the primer was on, then I sanded it with wet sandpaper, then added another layer of primer, sanded, another layer of primer, etc., until the little craters left by corrosion were gone. The final act was metallic spray paint, much like what Eric Jensen and Dave Krugler did. Yes I have a windshield for the Skiff, and it will go on next season, promise.

best,

Paul
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Eric Jensen
Eric Jensen

November 7th, 2013, 8:06 pm #17

Looks great Dave. What was the original finish on the frame? My buddy is struggling with the 66 Lancer frame as it's quite corroded. We were able to polish a small section to a high shine but it took hours. I'm thinking painting might be an easier option but I think polished is correct. My 75' had a windshield frame that was anodized so polishing was not an option. Fortunately it just needed cleaning(probably due to being anodized).
We wet sanded, wet sanded again, steel wooled, and polished which worked but took forever. Anyone have a better method?
I can't recall off hand what the finish was but I know that it's in Paul's book. It was a sparkle effect additive used straight up. (IMRON)

It looks good, if I say so myself.

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Paul
Paul

November 7th, 2013, 9:35 pm #18

.......just happened to have a copy of the book at my desk.

Page 104 says it is the PPG Delflect #ESM129 which is a sliver toner frequently mixed with other colors but was used straight up on the windshield.

The results speak for themselves. Eric, my own Skiff windshield is still in primer so I'll most likely be using the same on mine.

regards,

Paul
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Joined: October 29th, 2013, 2:58 pm

November 8th, 2013, 12:44 am #19

I used rattle cans... "VHT High Temperature Wheel Paint Chip Resistant Polyurethane Coating for Steel or Aluminum Wheels" catalog #SP-181 purchased on line from Caswell Plating. I bought 4 cans of this stuff for $8.25/can, used 2, still have 2. I cleaned the aluminum extrusions with fine emery cloth. The surfaces were originally anodized but years of neglect was not nice to them. They looked like new after a few coats of the VHT and still look great today. If you really try you can scratch it but I used it to paint the molding around the bilge access cover on the front floorboards and it is still holding up fairly well.

http://www.caswellplating.com/vht-wheel ... minum.html


Nothing but the latest downdraft paint booth used for my windshield LOL. I was particular not to try to paint while the wind was blowing road dust into the garage...



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Joined: August 26th, 2011, 11:36 am

November 8th, 2013, 2:24 am #20

To my eye the windshield does not appear to have been anodized. Even the literature shows more of a polished finish than anodized. I've seen some highly polished frames like Jim's SS. Not sure of it was polished or chromed but I recall it was beautiful. I'm thinking we will just keep polishing unless it becomes just too time consuming.

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