Miss Lily in the beginning

Dave
Dave

February 28th, 2007, 6:52 pm #1

This was about three years ago when we first got started
the boat sat in the same slip unused for 16 years and sank at the dock
(exahst pipe left lying in the floor disconnected and a stern line broke allowing the boat to hang on the dock when the tide went out and submerged the exhaust opening allowing water to flow back thru the exhaust and sink her)the original engines could not be salvaged still have the paragon trans in the garagethese pictures are of her stripped down to fighting weight

More will follow




















Edit comment: Because this particular thread has become so notorious in a good way, demonstrating what hard work and determination can do, I'm adding the glory photo below showing MISS LILY proudly at the docks after a LOT of work from Dave and Lily. The threads that follow chronicle all of this work, and it is a magnificient example of classic Chris Craft Commander restoration.
Regards, Paul,
forum moderator.










Last edited by FEfinaticP on October 17th, 2009, 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

February 28th, 2007, 7:06 pm #2

We as a group, must have some sort of death defying tendency, and a willingness to "go where no man has gone before". I'm mighty proud to be a member of the group, by the way, because it's a pretty savvy and capable group, who are able and willing to laugh in the face of adversity and prevail in the end!

There are so many success stories that took years to implement. My own boat has been in a state of ongoing renovation of some sort for the better part of 10 years. Now that I have it like I want it, I really have no desire for another cruiser, especially after buying a lake house last year (my budget for that 45' Tournament Fisherman I was dreaming about just flew away!).

I just started naming all the people I know who have gone through MAJOR restorations of a 38 Commander, and I just deleted the list, because I was sure to leave someone out. It is heart warming to see the Chris Craft Commander, as a model line, get the kind of respect like this, that a guy is willing to take on the task of restoration of a hull this old. The hull structure, by the way, should still be solid. Sixteen years in the water, ouch! You may be dipping into an epoxy budget, but if you let things dry out that hull bottom should give you good service.

My hat is off to you, Dave! The Commander community thanks you for saving this one! Send us some progress photos! (Thanks for the photos you've already sent, awesome!)

Threads like this are sure to inspire people to do the same. A Chris Craft Commander is a worthy craft for a restoration. As we know, Warren Pateman probably put the better part of a half million dollars into his 38. Most of us don't have a budget like Warren's, but the potential is still there for a great boat.

Regards, Paul
forum moderator

FXA 38 3004 R
427 power
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Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

February 28th, 2007, 7:19 pm #3

This was about three years ago when we first got started
the boat sat in the same slip unused for 16 years and sank at the dock
(exahst pipe left lying in the floor disconnected and a stern line broke allowing the boat to hang on the dock when the tide went out and submerged the exhaust opening allowing water to flow back thru the exhaust and sink her)the original engines could not be salvaged still have the paragon trans in the garagethese pictures are of her stripped down to fighting weight

More will follow




















Edit comment: Because this particular thread has become so notorious in a good way, demonstrating what hard work and determination can do, I'm adding the glory photo below showing MISS LILY proudly at the docks after a LOT of work from Dave and Lily. The threads that follow chronicle all of this work, and it is a magnificient example of classic Chris Craft Commander restoration.
Regards, Paul,
forum moderator.









How long was she under, and how deep? I see from the other thread it's a 1964 boat, number 27. It must be one of the very first 38 flybridge Commander Express boats built. I would guess the original motors were Lincoln 430s with 275 hp.

Have you repowered the boat yet? If so, what did you use, and if not what are you planning on using? What condition did you find the bottom in after 16 years? From the looks of things in the photo, it looks as though you had your work cut out for you, but things look solid.

Thanks for sharing your project with us,

Tom
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Paul
Paul

February 28th, 2007, 7:29 pm #4

This is # 27, she's a rare bird, especially with the flybridge. She would have come with 327F 210s or the 430 Lincolns at 275. The latter would have been preferred for an offshore salt water cruiser.

Paul
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Eric Jensen
Eric Jensen

March 1st, 2007, 6:30 pm #5

This was about three years ago when we first got started
the boat sat in the same slip unused for 16 years and sank at the dock
(exahst pipe left lying in the floor disconnected and a stern line broke allowing the boat to hang on the dock when the tide went out and submerged the exhaust opening allowing water to flow back thru the exhaust and sink her)the original engines could not be salvaged still have the paragon trans in the garagethese pictures are of her stripped down to fighting weight

More will follow




















Edit comment: Because this particular thread has become so notorious in a good way, demonstrating what hard work and determination can do, I'm adding the glory photo below showing MISS LILY proudly at the docks after a LOT of work from Dave and Lily. The threads that follow chronicle all of this work, and it is a magnificient example of classic Chris Craft Commander restoration.
Regards, Paul,
forum moderator.









Where are the exhaust outlets on this boat?

Eric
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Dave Mehl
Dave Mehl

March 1st, 2007, 6:31 pm #6

It's one of the cool design features of the model, you can't see them, but you can see water gushing out and you sure can hear the motors on these old battlewagons.

At the very aft section of the port and starboard end of the foil (that horizontal fin thing above the water line) there is a cast in fiberglass exhaust port about the size of a shoe box!

Dave
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Paul
Paul

March 1st, 2007, 6:31 pm #7

I have numerous photos taken right at the exhaust ports, but they're so well integrated they just blend into the background paint. You won't ever see tailpipes, per se, on an original equipment 38 Commander. Just one of the many cool styling features right out of the 1960's, used on this model.

Paul
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Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

March 1st, 2007, 6:47 pm #8

This was about three years ago when we first got started
the boat sat in the same slip unused for 16 years and sank at the dock
(exahst pipe left lying in the floor disconnected and a stern line broke allowing the boat to hang on the dock when the tide went out and submerged the exhaust opening allowing water to flow back thru the exhaust and sink her)the original engines could not be salvaged still have the paragon trans in the garagethese pictures are of her stripped down to fighting weight

More will follow




















Edit comment: Because this particular thread has become so notorious in a good way, demonstrating what hard work and determination can do, I'm adding the glory photo below showing MISS LILY proudly at the docks after a LOT of work from Dave and Lily. The threads that follow chronicle all of this work, and it is a magnificient example of classic Chris Craft Commander restoration.
Regards, Paul,
forum moderator.









What condition was the bottom in? I can see the photos, but they don't tell the whole story. Sixteen years in the water is quite a test! A lesser hull would have a barnacle eating trough to the inside!!

Tom
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Joined: February 28th, 2007, 2:38 pm

March 1st, 2007, 10:44 pm #9

Its Odd you mentioned it.
We were so lucky!
Unknown to us at the time when we purchased the boat;She was towed to a local boat yard in the summer of her 9th year of being unused They had the bottom cleaned. When they cleaned about a 6-9 inch crust off the bottom, sure enough they found blisters. How bad it was, I don't know, but, they did do an epoxy bottom job on her. Then they towed her back to the slip where she sat for another seven years. Some of the base of the barnacles were as large as silver dollars.
We started with 36 grit with an air file but that was slow going soon we found out that a monstourous 2 handed scraper did the job better Once we scratched her down we then went over her again with the air file and she smoothed right out clean!
We found this out when we took her back to the same yard(again unknown to us at the time) and the owner of the yard remembered the boat cause, he is the one that did the work. We really dodged a bullet on that one.

This is what we towed her to the boat yard with it is a Chris Craft 1938
36' sedan cruiser one of only 27 built.

According to documentation from Chris Craft this was the very boat they used for the 1938 New York boat show. We have Never seen a picture of her on the rack at the boat show but it sure would be nice to find one.We restored this also but thats another story.

We sold this boat to finance the restoration of Miss Lily

Last edited by FEfinaticP on October 17th, 2009, 3:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

March 1st, 2007, 11:20 pm #10

Beautiful 1938 cruiser ! I'll bet you got a lot of attention in that one !

Wood boats like that have soooo much character, I love them all, but I'm glad I no longer own one. Owning a glass Commander makes it a lot easier to sleep at night.

How are you coming on your project? If you are looking at replacing the tachometers I suppose you are well along now?

Tom
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