Legends of Algonac, Chris Smith & Gar Wood memorial, planning stages ( Herb Pocklington )

Legends of Algonac, Chris Smith & Gar Wood memorial, planning stages ( Herb Pocklington )

Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

May 12th, 2009, 10:20 pm #1

The following email came in from Herb Pocklington, former top executive at Chris Craft, who said there is precious little in his home town of Algonac to remind people of the world-wide boating legacy started there by the likes of Christopher Columbus Smith, starting the world famous Chris Craft boat line, and Garfield A. Wood, inventor of the hydraulic dump truck and notable boat racer and builder of premium wood boats.

Here is a note from Herb, announcing the start of a movement that will hopefully end with the expansion of the existing museum, get some examples of Chris Craft and Gar Wood boats there, along with some appropriate bronze statues of these two Algonac boys. This not-for-profit Chris Craft Commander Forum, Inc., is pleased to be a part of this effort.

From Herb Pocklington:

"In April I served as the keynote speaker at a Marine Symposium in Seattle
that brought together a number of boating organizations including antique boat clubs,
racing organizations and many others.

As perhaps the oldest living senior executive of Chris-Craft Corporation, I talked about its history,
beginning with Chris Smith and his wonderful family and, as former president of overseas operations,
about its world-wide success and leadership.

Because early history linked the Smiths with speed-boat champion Gar Wood, I provided first-hand reports of Gold Cup and Harmsworth Trophy races.
I was asked questions about Algonac memorials honoring both men and the industry.

The assumption that both their homes were preserved and filled with memorabilia was, of course,
quite logical (a la Greenfield Village for Henry Ford and Menlo Park for Edison).
While praising the very worthwhile effort of the Algonac museum, I was embarrassed to report that these great men's careers are,
perhaps, better remembered and honored elsewhere across the country - for example in Newport News, Virginia,
Seattle, Washington and others.


(BELOW): Here's a photo of a statue of Charley Chaplin looking out to sea (actually Lac Leman) in a
city park in Switzerland



(ABOVE two images side by side): Now, imagine a statue of Christopher C. Smith next to a statue of Gar Wood,
in a new Legends Park looking over their river in Algonac.

We've just begun to form a founding group in Algonac, with hopes to unveil their statues next to a new wing of the waterfront Museum
in the year 2010.....100 years from the date Chris and Gar held their first joint exposition at the
National Motor Boat Show in New York.

Publicity will begin later this year in the premium magazine Southern Boating,
and shortly on the international http://www.ChrisCraftCommander.com Website"




This is a worthy cause, anyone interested in being involved or contributing in any way, please send me a note at chriscraftcommander@hotmail.com and I'll relay the message to the appropriate individuals once this cause catches fire.

Regards,

Paul
ChrisCraftCommander.com forum host






April 10, 2010 Update:
Here we are several months later and the project has certainly gained a LOT of momentum thanks to the vision and ongoing push by Herb Pocklington. The latest report, featured below as the Photo of the Day here on THE FORUM, shows off the great work being done on this worthy project. Follow this entire thread down to the bottom and you will see a chronological listing of the progress, and comments received about this nice bit of history now being cast in bronze. What a fitting material for Chris Smith and Gar Wood!







Last edited by FEfinaticP on April 10th, 2010, 8:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 13th, 2007, 6:18 pm

May 13th, 2009, 4:58 am #2

Here's the deal as I see it... and this is just my .02 cents here...
I spend a LOT of time in the Algonac area, by land and sea, as it were, and I can justifiably say: "They don't care!" By that I mean, the folks in Algonac, say under the age of 50, don't care about the boat building heritage of their town. They don't know Chistopher Columbus Smith from Amerigo Vespucci... The youngsters(!)simply don't care. It's a crying shame...
If there is one of you from the area that disagrees, I'll eat my hat, (and it's a nice one).

Mr. Pocklington, I'm afraid, may be a bit Quixotic in his endevor, especially in this economic climate...

Agin, just my .02 cents...

John Kloka.

John Kloka
23 Lancer
Klokanuts
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Paul
Paul

May 13th, 2009, 2:52 pm #3

Hi John,

Hope all is well with you and yours, good comments and undoubtedly accurate. Your comments, however, totally support the notion that something should be done to save, promote, and educate the local population about this heritage. I have been in the museum at Algonac, it was educational, learned a lot. They need space, help, cash, and they're doing their best to carry the flag, but there is so much more that could and should be done.

On the banks of the Cumberland River at Dover, there are confederate shore batteries in place at an historic site that has been saved, and an interpretive center, preserving history that happened at that location and also educating people who may not know all of what happened there (and as a result probably don't care). Without being put there by people with a vision, there would be few kids in the area that would know (or care) what happened there in the past, they wouldn't know there are all thouse cannonballs still on the bottom of the Cumberland River, wouldn't know some of those Union gunboats that were repelled got hit by as many as 60 or more cannon balls.



Ever been to the Morgan building at Clayton? Bill Morgan donated the cash for the building, as I understand it. It may not even be called the Morgan Building now, but in any case, it was his initiative, it is well done in the true Thousand Island boat house style, almost looks like a canoe or lapstrake boat turned upside down from underneath when you look at the wood structure. It's well done. Inside are St. Lawrence sailing skiffs, and as I recall even some of Bill Morgans wood unlimited hydroplanes and motors. A walk through the place gives an appreciation for the culture of the area. Algonac, on essentially the "same river", only a few Great Lakes to the West, has the Chris Craft and Gar Wood racing and boat building dynasty, and it is sort of like my small home town in Pennsylvania, where only the historians know what transpired there in the past. Everyone else is worried that gas is $2.00 per gal, totally oblivious to significant accomplishment in the past. Ignorance is bliss, or at least quite a distraction.

I would agree with Herb, that Algonac could use a nice structure for the museum to expand into, or a totally new facility for that matter. The facility would include a boat house with notable examples of wood Chris Craft boats built in the area, and some Gar Wood boats as well, hopefully some of the MISS AMERICA series that used to be blasting down the river in front of the museum site, and of course, in front of the DYC as well. I wouldn't limit the display to CC and GW, there are others who deserve a piece of the history as well, including Mays Craft. Admittedly, Chris Craft is the dynasty that changed the world when it comes to pleasure boating.

To clear the air, in case anyone is wondering, I as an architect an not chasing a job here, believe me, I have enough work to finish in this lifetime without looking for more things to do. That work can be done nicely by a local person who can drive to the site, maybe I could help in some way, but there won't be any cash coming my way on this endeavor. As far as expressing the need and helping with getting the word out on the street, I'm in. I think it would be great for Algonac to have something that educates kids about what happened in their town, and it would pay respect most of the Chris Craft owners in the world have for the achievement of the company (and personnel who made it happen).

Looking back at the museum grounds at Clayton, New York, they have boat sheds on the grounds, with notable examples housed there, maintained in a sort of "mothball" manner until such time they can be restored. Even as they are, they are VERY interesting artifacts for people like me and you to walk around and look at. Of course, the main building at Clayton is full of beautifully restored boats, many of which are Hutchinson, built right there in town a short way from the museum. That facility does a great job educating the local population about their boating heritage, Algonac has so much more of a heritage.

So these ideas may not go forward, perhaps they'll only result in a couple of bronze statues that serve as a memorial and reminder of significant achievemet in the past. If Algonac is lucky, the idea will result in a larger facility that follows some of the same things that proved to be cost effective and worthwhile at the Antique Boat Museum at Clayton http://www.abm.org/

You'll note the Antique Boat Museum has a program where people can donate artifacts (of which there should be many in the Algonac area), many programs, sponsors, events, etc., and this is a small town that has a rich boating history, but nothing as grand or significant as Algonac !! The local government and management skills (and a lot of cash as well) are what made the Clayton facility what it is today. All those boats are donated, received tax breaks, and they are there for honorable educational purposes.

Actually the GLR (GRAND LADY OF THE RIVER) a large and beautiful Hutchinson commuter, one of the largest boats in the display, belonged to my good friend Dorman Burtch's dad, who was a doctor and made house calls in that boat all around the Thousand Islands. PARDON ME is another Hutchinson at the museum, and Clayton has done a great job preserving the Hutchinson legacy in their small little village. Sure would like to see Algonac do the same, they sure have the history, now they need the leadership, initiative, and the cash to get it budged off dead center. Looking at the challenges Mr. Pocklington has put behind him over the years, don't underestimate what connections, clear thinking, management expertise and leadership can do. I wish him well, and will help if and when I can because I think it is a great idea and a worthy cause. For now, my job is to help get the word out on the street, and that's the reason for the posting. I would hope ACBS on the local and national level would also take an interest in this big part of their membership interest base. After all, if you take Chris Craft (and to a lesser degree, Gar Wood) out of Antique and Classic Boating, there is a rather large void in the hobby, sport, history, and all the cottage industries and events that follow.

Being in Seattle recently at the same venue Herb mentioned, I got a chance to see their "Center for Wood Boats", and it has some of the Clayton mystique, doing better in some ways, not as good in others. Algonac has a foothold, and the potential is great. One thing for sure, they HAVE the history, and untold thousands of boats still revered around the world today, wood, glass, and metal, to prove it.










So many boats, so little time!

Regards,

Paul
forum host



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John Kloka
John Kloka

May 13th, 2009, 9:00 pm #4

Paul, you paint a pretty picture. There is no denying that we, as boaters with an eye toward the history of our hobby/sport/passion would benefit from a Seattle/Clayton style museum, as would future generations. Algonac itself would benefit immensely in revenues. As we all are here S.E. Michigan are trying to re-invent ourselves as the Auto industry is leaving, so should Algonac, which I think has never recovered its glory since Chris Craft left town.

I hate to think that an opportunity such as this would be squandered, but it seems to happen alot here in this apathetic corner of Michigan...
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Paul
Paul

May 13th, 2009, 9:26 pm #5

I hear ya loud and clear, reality check on the economy comment.

The economy around Clayton has long been in a state of seasonal depression, if not a little more grim than that, as they basically rely on the tourist industry these days around the "Thousand Islands". It is unusual that Clayton has been able to develop and nurture such a great boating culture. They have a nice harbor, a darn nice little picturesque town, and the Hutchinson Boat Works, built a lot of numbers boats and all sorts of others over the long term.

I think their city fathers had a pretty good vision of what they had, how to exploit it, and make the best of it. They also had access to some donors too, which would be nice if Algonac could organize, show some initiative, get the ball rolling, show everyone they want to do it right, design something that looks better than a cheap seafood restaurant with an overall plan that makes sense, and perhaps they would snag a donor or three too.

Stranger things have happened. Museums often run on volunteer time, shoe-string budgets. However they're doing it at Clayton works, and that could sure be a good model to follow. I think the city fathers at Algonac should visit that facility, talk with the management, learn a bit, and establish a long term master plan to "do it right". That would include establishing a strong bond with ACBS and CCABC too, that's where the donors are.

Leadership is not putting a wetted finger to the wind. Some local governments do it right, others don't. Mt. Dora, Florida, for instance, had (past tense) ONE of THE best boat show venues in the country. The local government fumbled the ball badly, and the entire reason I even know where Mt. Dora is on the map today just left for Tavares, down lake, where the "Dora" show has been for the last two years. I talked with some of the local merchants and they were spitting mad about it, but didn't think they could do anything. The local government officials responsible for that should be fired, in my opinion.

If Algonac just got some "cooperation" from local government, that would be nice. They may not fund it (totally), but "cooperation" such as "no taxes", and other help could go a long way. Where there's a will...............there generally is a way. `

Regards,

Paul
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Joined: December 20th, 2007, 5:01 pm

May 13th, 2009, 10:19 pm #6

ALL:
In my work, I run into this situation often. Someone with a vision and someone dealing with reality. It can be a long journey from the vision to the actual thing. Tourism is a powerful magnet for income to a community. But seldom is one item be powerful enough to draw a crowd large enough to re-energize a community.

Concommitant attractions have to be developed as well. The finance from the museum intake will not be enough or be distributed to enough different stakeholders to attract the support (other than philanthropic) needed for community invigoration. Could the museum act as a catalyst for the other development needed to energize the community? Yes, but it will require outside capital investment or enormous community support. The same with the car industry communities. The capital is going elsewhere.

A school of boatbuilding, school of marine diesel, gas or hybrid would fit along with the museum. B&B's and other small, local support industries would fit. Rivival of an annual race (such as the Sturgus N.D. motorcycle rally) would fit. Clearly an annual Chris Craft/Roamer, (or boatshow with no limits) rondevous should be held there and would fit. There are many more examples that I am not cleaver enough to list here.

The need is to generate a large enough stakeholder base and enough stakeholder support to get the snowball rolling. It takes a real activist with dedication and vision to see the process through. Communities, like people, go through a maturity process. Maybe the car industry communities are not there yet, maybe the Algonac community has had enough of poverty and is ready to create their own change.

Academically speaking, a museum does no harm. Investment wise, powerful support must be attracted or in place beyond the historical entertainment value of a museum. Sometimes this takes a while until the right people ($$$$) come along or the community makes the choice.

West Texas and the Southwest have reinvented themselves several times. It is no easy job to find the investment support to rebuild an abandoned downtown section, but many communities across the US have done so. In Texas, we have a saying: "If ya kain't say anythang fer me, at least don't say anythang aginst me!"

A wise move now is to survey the interest while listening hard to those who have a stake in the outcome. Frustraition can be turned into support but only when equity issues are addressed and agreed upon by all stakeholders.
My .02s worth,
Jerry
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Paul
Paul

February 1st, 2010, 6:37 pm #7

The following email came in from Herb Pocklington, former top executive at Chris Craft, who said there is precious little in his home town of Algonac to remind people of the world-wide boating legacy started there by the likes of Christopher Columbus Smith, starting the world famous Chris Craft boat line, and Garfield A. Wood, inventor of the hydraulic dump truck and notable boat racer and builder of premium wood boats.

Here is a note from Herb, announcing the start of a movement that will hopefully end with the expansion of the existing museum, get some examples of Chris Craft and Gar Wood boats there, along with some appropriate bronze statues of these two Algonac boys. This not-for-profit Chris Craft Commander Forum, Inc., is pleased to be a part of this effort.

From Herb Pocklington:

"In April I served as the keynote speaker at a Marine Symposium in Seattle
that brought together a number of boating organizations including antique boat clubs,
racing organizations and many others.

As perhaps the oldest living senior executive of Chris-Craft Corporation, I talked about its history,
beginning with Chris Smith and his wonderful family and, as former president of overseas operations,
about its world-wide success and leadership.

Because early history linked the Smiths with speed-boat champion Gar Wood, I provided first-hand reports of Gold Cup and Harmsworth Trophy races.
I was asked questions about Algonac memorials honoring both men and the industry.

The assumption that both their homes were preserved and filled with memorabilia was, of course,
quite logical (a la Greenfield Village for Henry Ford and Menlo Park for Edison).
While praising the very worthwhile effort of the Algonac museum, I was embarrassed to report that these great men's careers are,
perhaps, better remembered and honored elsewhere across the country - for example in Newport News, Virginia,
Seattle, Washington and others.


(BELOW): Here's a photo of a statue of Charley Chaplin looking out to sea (actually Lac Leman) in a
city park in Switzerland



(ABOVE two images side by side): Now, imagine a statue of Christopher C. Smith next to a statue of Gar Wood,
in a new Legends Park looking over their river in Algonac.

We've just begun to form a founding group in Algonac, with hopes to unveil their statues next to a new wing of the waterfront Museum
in the year 2010.....100 years from the date Chris and Gar held their first joint exposition at the
National Motor Boat Show in New York.

Publicity will begin later this year in the premium magazine Southern Boating,
and shortly on the international http://www.ChrisCraftCommander.com Website"




This is a worthy cause, anyone interested in being involved or contributing in any way, please send me a note at chriscraftcommander@hotmail.com and I'll relay the message to the appropriate individuals once this cause catches fire.

Regards,

Paul
ChrisCraftCommander.com forum host






April 10, 2010 Update:
Here we are several months later and the project has certainly gained a LOT of momentum thanks to the vision and ongoing push by Herb Pocklington. The latest report, featured below as the Photo of the Day here on THE FORUM, shows off the great work being done on this worthy project. Follow this entire thread down to the bottom and you will see a chronological listing of the progress, and comments received about this nice bit of history now being cast in bronze. What a fitting material for Chris Smith and Gar Wood!






Herb Pockling has been busy. Things are moving on THE LEGENDS OF ALGONAC. The ACBS has formally supported the idea, and this means there will be some cash to follow too! This is good stuff, for a great cause, and many of we Commander Owners pay respect to Algonac for the role it played in the Commander Legacy too.

Here is a recent article !! More to come later..........







By Jeri Packer, Voice Staff Writer

Many longtime Algonac residents can still appreciate the legacy left by two hometown men who changed the face of the boating industry, Chris Smith and Gar Wood.

"What the Wright Brothers were to airplanes and Henry Ford was to cars, Chris Smith and Gar Wood were to boats," said Pete Beauregard, chairman of the Legends of Algonac project.

The venture, conceived last summer by former Chris/Craft executive Herb Pocklington, includes installing two life-size statues of the renowned men in Algonac Park. An annex on the Algonac/Clay Museum, with an extensive collection of Chris Craft memorabilia, is also part of Pocklington's vision.

As the New Year rang in, Ukrainian-born artist Sergei Mitrofanov began the challenging task of bringing the characters to life at, of all places, the old Chris Craft factory. Beauregard said Mitrofanov's studio at the Algonac Harbor Club is the old parts and service building.

"It's exciting having Sergei on the site of the people who are going to be in the artwork," he said.

Setting up shop in Algonac has also been helpful to the artist for research purposes. He said getting to know his subjects thoroughly is important when it comes to creating a believable work that adequately reflects their true spirit.

"I spent some time looking through albums full of pictures and collecting as much information as I could, trying to get acquainted with these two people," he said. "It's absolutely necessary. These are real people who lived in that time."

He spent hours poring over materials about Smith and Wood and the world-renowned boating company, Chris Craft, while talking to local Chris Craft experts.

Mitrofanov, 52, obtained his masters degree in fine art in the Soviet Union and came to the United States in 1990. He is known for his bronze sculpture, "Resurrection," installed at the St. Bonaventure Monastery in Detroit. His latest work is displayed at the Church of the Transfiguration in Southfield, formerly the St. Michael Church. A scene from the biblical Pentecost is displayed on the church facade, where he used a technique similar to the one used on the statue of liberty, he said.

The Legends statues will actually be larger-than-life, standing seven feet high and sitting on a five-foot granite pedestal.

Algonac/Clay Township Historical Society President Don LaCombe said members are anxiously waiting the unveiling of the Legends of Algonac, set for sometime this summer.

"Now that the sculpture is here, we can keep an eye on the progress," he said. "We're looking forward to it."

Beauregard said the Smith/Wood memorial will not only be a reminder of the area's rich heritage, but it will likely bring a host of visitors to the riverside town.

"Once it's there and the annex gets added, the town will be a magnet for people," he said.

Pocklington said donations have been coming in from boat enthusiasts all over the world. More locally, many individuals and groups in the Blue Water Area have shown their support through generous contributions. Beauregard said they have raised about 40 percent of the funds needed to complete the project.

"Algonac people are supporting us tremendously," he said.

For more information on the Legends of Algonac, contact Herb Pocklington at hlpocklington@aol.com or (321) 459-1073.

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John Kloka
John Kloka

February 1st, 2010, 8:59 pm #8

That's great! I would 've never thought it was possible. If Pete Beauregard is the Chairman, I'm sure it's for real and I'm sure it will happen.

Pete owns the Algonac Harbor, as well as Colony Marine, one of the original, and largest Sea Ray dealers. Colony was a Chris Craft dealer back in the good ol' days. Pete owns an immaculate 18' Cobra!
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Dave Mehl
Dave Mehl

February 1st, 2010, 9:45 pm #9

Herb Pockling has been busy. Things are moving on THE LEGENDS OF ALGONAC. The ACBS has formally supported the idea, and this means there will be some cash to follow too! This is good stuff, for a great cause, and many of we Commander Owners pay respect to Algonac for the role it played in the Commander Legacy too.

Here is a recent article !! More to come later..........







By Jeri Packer, Voice Staff Writer

Many longtime Algonac residents can still appreciate the legacy left by two hometown men who changed the face of the boating industry, Chris Smith and Gar Wood.

"What the Wright Brothers were to airplanes and Henry Ford was to cars, Chris Smith and Gar Wood were to boats," said Pete Beauregard, chairman of the Legends of Algonac project.

The venture, conceived last summer by former Chris/Craft executive Herb Pocklington, includes installing two life-size statues of the renowned men in Algonac Park. An annex on the Algonac/Clay Museum, with an extensive collection of Chris Craft memorabilia, is also part of Pocklington's vision.

As the New Year rang in, Ukrainian-born artist Sergei Mitrofanov began the challenging task of bringing the characters to life at, of all places, the old Chris Craft factory. Beauregard said Mitrofanov's studio at the Algonac Harbor Club is the old parts and service building.

"It's exciting having Sergei on the site of the people who are going to be in the artwork," he said.

Setting up shop in Algonac has also been helpful to the artist for research purposes. He said getting to know his subjects thoroughly is important when it comes to creating a believable work that adequately reflects their true spirit.

"I spent some time looking through albums full of pictures and collecting as much information as I could, trying to get acquainted with these two people," he said. "It's absolutely necessary. These are real people who lived in that time."

He spent hours poring over materials about Smith and Wood and the world-renowned boating company, Chris Craft, while talking to local Chris Craft experts.

Mitrofanov, 52, obtained his masters degree in fine art in the Soviet Union and came to the United States in 1990. He is known for his bronze sculpture, "Resurrection," installed at the St. Bonaventure Monastery in Detroit. His latest work is displayed at the Church of the Transfiguration in Southfield, formerly the St. Michael Church. A scene from the biblical Pentecost is displayed on the church facade, where he used a technique similar to the one used on the statue of liberty, he said.

The Legends statues will actually be larger-than-life, standing seven feet high and sitting on a five-foot granite pedestal.

Algonac/Clay Township Historical Society President Don LaCombe said members are anxiously waiting the unveiling of the Legends of Algonac, set for sometime this summer.

"Now that the sculpture is here, we can keep an eye on the progress," he said. "We're looking forward to it."

Beauregard said the Smith/Wood memorial will not only be a reminder of the area's rich heritage, but it will likely bring a host of visitors to the riverside town.

"Once it's there and the annex gets added, the town will be a magnet for people," he said.

Pocklington said donations have been coming in from boat enthusiasts all over the world. More locally, many individuals and groups in the Blue Water Area have shown their support through generous contributions. Beauregard said they have raised about 40 percent of the funds needed to complete the project.

"Algonac people are supporting us tremendously," he said.

For more information on the Legends of Algonac, contact Herb Pocklington at hlpocklington@aol.com or (321) 459-1073.
Glad to hear about ACBS getting on board, that is huge. ACBS takes so much from Algonac with all of the Chris Craft and Gar Wood action, it is fitting that they "give back". Thanks for the update, keep us posted on this.

Dave
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Joined: May 25th, 2009, 11:34 pm

February 4th, 2010, 3:23 pm #10

ALL:
In my work, I run into this situation often. Someone with a vision and someone dealing with reality. It can be a long journey from the vision to the actual thing. Tourism is a powerful magnet for income to a community. But seldom is one item be powerful enough to draw a crowd large enough to re-energize a community.

Concommitant attractions have to be developed as well. The finance from the museum intake will not be enough or be distributed to enough different stakeholders to attract the support (other than philanthropic) needed for community invigoration. Could the museum act as a catalyst for the other development needed to energize the community? Yes, but it will require outside capital investment or enormous community support. The same with the car industry communities. The capital is going elsewhere.

A school of boatbuilding, school of marine diesel, gas or hybrid would fit along with the museum. B&B's and other small, local support industries would fit. Rivival of an annual race (such as the Sturgus N.D. motorcycle rally) would fit. Clearly an annual Chris Craft/Roamer, (or boatshow with no limits) rondevous should be held there and would fit. There are many more examples that I am not cleaver enough to list here.

The need is to generate a large enough stakeholder base and enough stakeholder support to get the snowball rolling. It takes a real activist with dedication and vision to see the process through. Communities, like people, go through a maturity process. Maybe the car industry communities are not there yet, maybe the Algonac community has had enough of poverty and is ready to create their own change.

Academically speaking, a museum does no harm. Investment wise, powerful support must be attracted or in place beyond the historical entertainment value of a museum. Sometimes this takes a while until the right people ($$$$) come along or the community makes the choice.

West Texas and the Southwest have reinvented themselves several times. It is no easy job to find the investment support to rebuild an abandoned downtown section, but many communities across the US have done so. In Texas, we have a saying: "If ya kain't say anythang fer me, at least don't say anythang aginst me!"

A wise move now is to survey the interest while listening hard to those who have a stake in the outcome. Frustraition can be turned into support but only when equity issues are addressed and agreed upon by all stakeholders.
My .02s worth,
Jerry
Hello

http://www.classicboats.org/

The link is to an example of what a small community on Vancouver Island was able to do. They don't have a Chris or a Gar history. They only had a crumbling marine way and a long gone fishing industry - no illustrious history in the Cowichan Valley.

The centre includes a museum, a workshop and a marine rail, it is a "working" facility. You can learn to build a wood boat, or get some help restoring one or check out some beautiful examples of restored classic local boats in the museum or afloat at the docks. They have created several revenue streams to help underwrite the overheads ongoing.

The best thing about the project IMHO is the community they have developed from next to nothing. The new Chris Craft Corporation would have a stake here. It is also their "history".

Norm







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