Introducing my 33' Coho project and I

Introducing my 33' Coho project and I

Joined: October 22nd, 2011, 1:58 am

October 27th, 2011, 3:44 am #1

I've made a couple small posts but figured I'd start a main thread on my "new" vessel.



I decided to take up the hobby of boating in 2008, more or less randomly and without experience, by picking up a 1985 19' Bayliner Capri cuddy for $500. Since then I've done most everything possible to it, including new stringers and decks, resealing the sterndrive, external engine work, gauges, vinyl...bla bla lol. I've trailered it most everywhere but since moving to the west side of Michigan from Lansing I discovered what its like to keep it at a marina and since this season we've (my girlfriend and I) have taken up River Haven Marina in Grand Haven on the Grand River as our summer vacation home, if you will. Before this I've trailered the thing everywhere it seems but have done some somewhat long distance Great Lakes cruising with it. While it certainly isn't much in the world of boats as far as size, and certainly not of much prestige being a cheap Bayliner with (originally) shoddy build quality, I've been proud of it since I've rebuilt the thing by hand by myself.

At any rate when checking out marinas last fall we stopped at a boat dealer (Skipper Bud's in Coopersville) and happened to look at a 28' Catalina there. I suddenly became fascinated with older Chris Crafts due to the roomy layout which I perceived as being unconventional at the time, being used to walking down into express cruiser style boats with midberths. Since then I've soaked up a lot of knowledge on Roamer's, Constellation's, Sea Skiff's, Catalina's, Commander's...I decided that wooden vessels may require too much time/effort that I could give. Steel Roamer's seemed like a good idea. I didn't like the idea of fiberglass again due to my experience with stringers that I didn't want to do again. I knew the Catalina's I liked had wood encased stringers and figured that Commander's did too.

From my own thinking and opinions from others close to me I figured that due to my not-that-high income and part time college career mixed in with a car loan (that I took up before a drastic life shakeup last year) that I should at least get that out of the way first before upgrading my vessel. But, I figured it wouldn't hurt to shop craigslist and ebay, you know, to better familiarize myself with Chris Craft's...well, that turned into a daily habit during my morning breaks at work...bad idea...

As of a few weeks ago I've become the more or less proud owner of a 1971 33' Chris Craft Coho (seen it called a Catalina Sedan as well). I went and looked at it and found it to be in a condition I could take on (or so I think) and searching online indicated that these had all glass stringers which was the dealbreaker for me. I didn't remember seeing CC's like these and felt that we would like the big salon of the sedan more versus like a more conventional CC cabin layout (note that since then I found out your Commander's also have all glass stringers). The really big flybridge was cool to me as well. I bought it through ebay from a marina/dealer in St. Joseph, about 75 miles south of my marina. They said they were able to start both of its 327QA's but didn't say any more and didn't give any warranty on anything. Starboard 327 (number 2?) had a lot of water on its dipstick. It was repo-ed by the marina due to lack of storage payment, which they said was due to the owner dying and the family not caring for it. I've found gas receipts from 2007 inside though it has a Michigan registration sticker good until 2012 but at any rate I'm assuming it hasn't been floated in a while. I was able to get it for $620. Realizing that attempting to get it running decently and piloting it back over Lake Michigan wasn't the best idea, I got a few quotes to ship it over land ranging up to $1500 but found that Jeff from Anchorage Bay marine in Holland was willing to do it for much, much less. I'd suggest contacting him if you need to ship a vessel over land.

This is the Coho as it sat at Pier 33 marina



Jeff of Anchorage with his F450 and hydraulic trailer. I took the day off of work to see the move happen











And its new home out back at River Haven. Now comes why it got down to a mere $620...



Flybridge deck (old varnished plywood...?) is leaking into the salon as indicated by this light being full of water and the headliner stains. The vessel has been outside, uncovered for a while. It had a canvas cover (included) that was removed because it was sagging due to snow load, and thus the broken flybridge windshield. Also note the loose panel in the rear which was hiding some rotten wood holding up the flybridge. The same panel on the exterior is also rotten, on both sides. Why did they use a wooden cabin structure when even their wooden boats already had fiberglass cabins?



There's this board that runs under the side windows in the cabin that's rotten in a lot of places, I suspect due to the sliding windows leaking.



This shot forward of the lower helm shows extensive rot of the board mentioned above along with more rot. The panel of glass on the right is cracked and was partially open. It seems someone in the past was frustrated enough with this and sawzalled out some of the dash



Same area as seen from the forward cabin



Some plywood seen in the forward cabin. This and a few areas of the plywood beneath the side decks is bad, I'm guessing due to the caulk joint between the side deck and the cabin superstructure opening up. These areas seem fairly easy to access from inside, thankfully. Do Commander's have a similar construction? There isn't any glass underneath, just bare wood held up there in some unknown fashion. I was thinking of sawzalling these bad areas out carefully from the inside and underneath, cutting new pressure treated plywood (which will be used throughout the wood replacement process), and bonding it back with epoxy to the bottom of the side decks while putting a few countersunk screws through the side decks down into the new plywood core then covering the heads with resin/gelcoat/epoxy/marinetex...does this idea seem ok? The side decks dont truly seem soft when walking on them but they do seem wavy. Then again I weigh around 140 lbs and don't put that much pressure on them so they may feel soft anyway. Regardless I'll be drilling core samples from the bottom to seek out the bad cores.



I know these household Square D panels came with these vessels but aren't acceptable today. I'll give the system a good inspection and will replace in the near future (as in a season or two).



Starboard engine has had a lot of water in it that I've been pumping out with my vaccum oil pump. From what I've gathered there's a water cavity in the intake manifold that is prone to freezing and cracking so that will be my first place to look. I'm hoping the water was just introduced into the crankcase when the yard started the engines (they connected water to the inlets of the sea water pumps, BTW) and that it hasn't been sitting with water in the oil for years.



The rear cabin wall/bulkhead is in bad shape below the deck. I believe that's the water heater pictured in blue. Due to the wall seeming to be in salvageable condition above the deck I want to look into scarfing it together with a new piece of PT plywood below decks. I don't know yet though since I'd like to redo the rear wall with windows on each side of the door, so I might end up replacing it entirely...might take the poly resin/gelcoat route in that case



2.5kw Kohler has super low compression considering i can easily turn the crank pulley by hand in an awkward position. Yard did not attempt starting it.

I need to winterize the engines and have discovered the preferred method, utilizing a bucket to catch the exhaust and hold antifreeze, a pump between that and the sea water pump, and running the engine (draining it first) a while to get antifreeze though everything. I attempted to start number 1 the other day but found that it wasn't getting fuel. I'm not really able to diagnose the fuel system at this time...hell I don't even know if there's a drop in the tanks since I've been busy and the boat's 40 minutes away. I'll be working on it quite a bit this winter but I do need to winterize them before the cold really hits. I plan on draining water from all the plugs and petcocks then adding antifreeze into the hoses and letting it flow into every passage and chamber possible. Thankfully a marina neighbor with a 32' Cavalier sent me a copy of the engine service manual telling where all the drains were. I find it interesting that it doesn't mention adding any antifreeze.

Any tips, comments, questions so far? I hope to get it seaworthy again by this spring.



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Joined: October 22nd, 2011, 1:58 am

October 27th, 2011, 4:23 am #2

I posted extensively about my Bayliner restoration on the iBoats message board but this place seems to be the best place for classic CC's. Lots of interesting reading in old posts and the master library
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Paul
Paul

October 27th, 2011, 2:15 pm #3

I've made a couple small posts but figured I'd start a main thread on my "new" vessel.



I decided to take up the hobby of boating in 2008, more or less randomly and without experience, by picking up a 1985 19' Bayliner Capri cuddy for $500. Since then I've done most everything possible to it, including new stringers and decks, resealing the sterndrive, external engine work, gauges, vinyl...bla bla lol. I've trailered it most everywhere but since moving to the west side of Michigan from Lansing I discovered what its like to keep it at a marina and since this season we've (my girlfriend and I) have taken up River Haven Marina in Grand Haven on the Grand River as our summer vacation home, if you will. Before this I've trailered the thing everywhere it seems but have done some somewhat long distance Great Lakes cruising with it. While it certainly isn't much in the world of boats as far as size, and certainly not of much prestige being a cheap Bayliner with (originally) shoddy build quality, I've been proud of it since I've rebuilt the thing by hand by myself.

At any rate when checking out marinas last fall we stopped at a boat dealer (Skipper Bud's in Coopersville) and happened to look at a 28' Catalina there. I suddenly became fascinated with older Chris Crafts due to the roomy layout which I perceived as being unconventional at the time, being used to walking down into express cruiser style boats with midberths. Since then I've soaked up a lot of knowledge on Roamer's, Constellation's, Sea Skiff's, Catalina's, Commander's...I decided that wooden vessels may require too much time/effort that I could give. Steel Roamer's seemed like a good idea. I didn't like the idea of fiberglass again due to my experience with stringers that I didn't want to do again. I knew the Catalina's I liked had wood encased stringers and figured that Commander's did too.

From my own thinking and opinions from others close to me I figured that due to my not-that-high income and part time college career mixed in with a car loan (that I took up before a drastic life shakeup last year) that I should at least get that out of the way first before upgrading my vessel. But, I figured it wouldn't hurt to shop craigslist and ebay, you know, to better familiarize myself with Chris Craft's...well, that turned into a daily habit during my morning breaks at work...bad idea...

As of a few weeks ago I've become the more or less proud owner of a 1971 33' Chris Craft Coho (seen it called a Catalina Sedan as well). I went and looked at it and found it to be in a condition I could take on (or so I think) and searching online indicated that these had all glass stringers which was the dealbreaker for me. I didn't remember seeing CC's like these and felt that we would like the big salon of the sedan more versus like a more conventional CC cabin layout (note that since then I found out your Commander's also have all glass stringers). The really big flybridge was cool to me as well. I bought it through ebay from a marina/dealer in St. Joseph, about 75 miles south of my marina. They said they were able to start both of its 327QA's but didn't say any more and didn't give any warranty on anything. Starboard 327 (number 2?) had a lot of water on its dipstick. It was repo-ed by the marina due to lack of storage payment, which they said was due to the owner dying and the family not caring for it. I've found gas receipts from 2007 inside though it has a Michigan registration sticker good until 2012 but at any rate I'm assuming it hasn't been floated in a while. I was able to get it for $620. Realizing that attempting to get it running decently and piloting it back over Lake Michigan wasn't the best idea, I got a few quotes to ship it over land ranging up to $1500 but found that Jeff from Anchorage Bay marine in Holland was willing to do it for much, much less. I'd suggest contacting him if you need to ship a vessel over land.

This is the Coho as it sat at Pier 33 marina



Jeff of Anchorage with his F450 and hydraulic trailer. I took the day off of work to see the move happen











And its new home out back at River Haven. Now comes why it got down to a mere $620...



Flybridge deck (old varnished plywood...?) is leaking into the salon as indicated by this light being full of water and the headliner stains. The vessel has been outside, uncovered for a while. It had a canvas cover (included) that was removed because it was sagging due to snow load, and thus the broken flybridge windshield. Also note the loose panel in the rear which was hiding some rotten wood holding up the flybridge. The same panel on the exterior is also rotten, on both sides. Why did they use a wooden cabin structure when even their wooden boats already had fiberglass cabins?



There's this board that runs under the side windows in the cabin that's rotten in a lot of places, I suspect due to the sliding windows leaking.



This shot forward of the lower helm shows extensive rot of the board mentioned above along with more rot. The panel of glass on the right is cracked and was partially open. It seems someone in the past was frustrated enough with this and sawzalled out some of the dash



Same area as seen from the forward cabin



Some plywood seen in the forward cabin. This and a few areas of the plywood beneath the side decks is bad, I'm guessing due to the caulk joint between the side deck and the cabin superstructure opening up. These areas seem fairly easy to access from inside, thankfully. Do Commander's have a similar construction? There isn't any glass underneath, just bare wood held up there in some unknown fashion. I was thinking of sawzalling these bad areas out carefully from the inside and underneath, cutting new pressure treated plywood (which will be used throughout the wood replacement process), and bonding it back with epoxy to the bottom of the side decks while putting a few countersunk screws through the side decks down into the new plywood core then covering the heads with resin/gelcoat/epoxy/marinetex...does this idea seem ok? The side decks dont truly seem soft when walking on them but they do seem wavy. Then again I weigh around 140 lbs and don't put that much pressure on them so they may feel soft anyway. Regardless I'll be drilling core samples from the bottom to seek out the bad cores.



I know these household Square D panels came with these vessels but aren't acceptable today. I'll give the system a good inspection and will replace in the near future (as in a season or two).



Starboard engine has had a lot of water in it that I've been pumping out with my vaccum oil pump. From what I've gathered there's a water cavity in the intake manifold that is prone to freezing and cracking so that will be my first place to look. I'm hoping the water was just introduced into the crankcase when the yard started the engines (they connected water to the inlets of the sea water pumps, BTW) and that it hasn't been sitting with water in the oil for years.



The rear cabin wall/bulkhead is in bad shape below the deck. I believe that's the water heater pictured in blue. Due to the wall seeming to be in salvageable condition above the deck I want to look into scarfing it together with a new piece of PT plywood below decks. I don't know yet though since I'd like to redo the rear wall with windows on each side of the door, so I might end up replacing it entirely...might take the poly resin/gelcoat route in that case



2.5kw Kohler has super low compression considering i can easily turn the crank pulley by hand in an awkward position. Yard did not attempt starting it.

I need to winterize the engines and have discovered the preferred method, utilizing a bucket to catch the exhaust and hold antifreeze, a pump between that and the sea water pump, and running the engine (draining it first) a while to get antifreeze though everything. I attempted to start number 1 the other day but found that it wasn't getting fuel. I'm not really able to diagnose the fuel system at this time...hell I don't even know if there's a drop in the tanks since I've been busy and the boat's 40 minutes away. I'll be working on it quite a bit this winter but I do need to winterize them before the cold really hits. I plan on draining water from all the plugs and petcocks then adding antifreeze into the hoses and letting it flow into every passage and chamber possible. Thankfully a marina neighbor with a 32' Cavalier sent me a copy of the engine service manual telling where all the drains were. I find it interesting that it doesn't mention adding any antifreeze.

Any tips, comments, questions so far? I hope to get it seaworthy again by this spring.


Hey Philip,

You are to be congratulated for jumping into the boating hobby like this. You obviously have the bug and the ability do do some or all of your own work and in these times that makes a huge difference. You will eventually be able to get into a cruiser for pennies on the dollar doing this, but it will still take cash and a LOT of work.

The Commanders have no wood in the wet zone, although engine stringers are wood for fastening engines to, they are mounted on tall fiberglass box beams above the water zone in the bilge. In fact, much of the reinforcement in a Commander hull is from these hollow transverse and longitudinal fiberglass box beams, and that is a very strong and durable way to build. There is no wood core in the wetted hull. I do not know if this same thing can be said about the Coho, but we can (and will) find out. The Coho has a nice look to it, and it has a HUGE interior space and utility, so this should be one heck of a fun boat to have when you are done.

Working on a boat you MUST not ever use an inappropriate wood type because it is likely to deteriorate before you ever get the boat in the water. Much of the support on some of the early Commanders like my 1966 38 is built with solid mahogany lumber. The entire galley support is built of mahogany lumber. Since doing that today is going to be nuts because of the cost, I would recommend a white oak, it is durable and weather resistant enough to have been used in the bilge of the Chris Craft Sea Skiff boats. Natually, sealing this wood is important too.

Headliner is easy......once removed....you can do all the work you need to do and then call in a pro to put a new one back for you. This is one job I would not do myself, because the pros have the tools and the knowhow to seam and tuck, etc., and they will do it like a new boat.

I suppose you can use pressure treated plywood in some areas, but I don't like the stuff on boats because I think it has salts in it to preserve the wood and that can get into fasteners and wiring, and I think you are just better off using marine plywood. You can get the stuff at most big plywood supply houses, just ask for fir based marine plywood, you don't have to use the mahogany stuff for structural issues.

When it comes to woodwork around the helm, you can (and should) bite the bullet and get some mahogany marine plywood, refinish the entire helm and use the plywood to replace any deteriorated pieces, stain and varnish everything at the same time and it will look like it was built that way. There are many examples here in THE FORUM to show how this can be done properly.

The Square D panels are original, I just took the faces off mine, sanded and primed them, and sprayed them with a nice original color gray and now they look new. Inside there was no deterioration.

When you get to the engines and transmissions then there will be a day of reckoning. On many CC motors the only thing they recommended to do was to drain ALL of the drain points, including those on risers, blocks, pumps, EVERYTHING. By doing this CC knew they designed the drains to avoid freeze pockets in the boat, but I must not speak for your particular installation because it may be different, so you must look and be very careful about how you do this. I would drain the oil in the motors, chances are the oil is still in there and since oil floats on water if you put the drain tube at the bottom of the sump you will soon know if there is any water in there. The good news is if there is a little, since it may be just limited to the bottom perhaps it did not get into the pickup and cause any rust. I guess I would replace the oil too and certainly seal off the tops of the motors to assure you are not getting water seepage into the intake manifolds. If you drain everything down and use a little antifreeze too, you should be good. Beware, antifreeze is toxic to dogs, and it only takes a lick or two to kill one. Use the non toxic stuff.

Some of the generators of this era had a recall for the exhaust manifold, be sure to look at yours to be sure it is in good shape. Also, ANYONE running a generator MUST have a carbon monoxide detector on board......don't ever run one without it. Monoxide builds slowly in the blood stream and then when a person really is not aware they get sleepy and never wake up.

So you have yourself a real project, and I admire your adventure. Go for it. The project may take a year or three, but in the end you'll have a cruiser that is loads of fun and we have many experts here on this forum who can give you assistance on every inch of the boat.

regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

October 27th, 2011, 2:26 pm #4

I posted extensively about my Bayliner restoration on the iBoats message board but this place seems to be the best place for classic CC's. Lots of interesting reading in old posts and the master library
I honestly don't think you can even come close to matching the information and technology available here for your project.

Here are a few examples



OMG look at that shag carpet.......a sign of the times!!!!!!!



Go here for a great start into the database. The more you look, the more you will find.
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1213392179

Regards,

Paul










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Joined: September 14th, 2011, 10:43 pm

October 27th, 2011, 4:06 pm #5

Hey Philip,

You are to be congratulated for jumping into the boating hobby like this. You obviously have the bug and the ability do do some or all of your own work and in these times that makes a huge difference. You will eventually be able to get into a cruiser for pennies on the dollar doing this, but it will still take cash and a LOT of work.

The Commanders have no wood in the wet zone, although engine stringers are wood for fastening engines to, they are mounted on tall fiberglass box beams above the water zone in the bilge. In fact, much of the reinforcement in a Commander hull is from these hollow transverse and longitudinal fiberglass box beams, and that is a very strong and durable way to build. There is no wood core in the wetted hull. I do not know if this same thing can be said about the Coho, but we can (and will) find out. The Coho has a nice look to it, and it has a HUGE interior space and utility, so this should be one heck of a fun boat to have when you are done.

Working on a boat you MUST not ever use an inappropriate wood type because it is likely to deteriorate before you ever get the boat in the water. Much of the support on some of the early Commanders like my 1966 38 is built with solid mahogany lumber. The entire galley support is built of mahogany lumber. Since doing that today is going to be nuts because of the cost, I would recommend a white oak, it is durable and weather resistant enough to have been used in the bilge of the Chris Craft Sea Skiff boats. Natually, sealing this wood is important too.

Headliner is easy......once removed....you can do all the work you need to do and then call in a pro to put a new one back for you. This is one job I would not do myself, because the pros have the tools and the knowhow to seam and tuck, etc., and they will do it like a new boat.

I suppose you can use pressure treated plywood in some areas, but I don't like the stuff on boats because I think it has salts in it to preserve the wood and that can get into fasteners and wiring, and I think you are just better off using marine plywood. You can get the stuff at most big plywood supply houses, just ask for fir based marine plywood, you don't have to use the mahogany stuff for structural issues.

When it comes to woodwork around the helm, you can (and should) bite the bullet and get some mahogany marine plywood, refinish the entire helm and use the plywood to replace any deteriorated pieces, stain and varnish everything at the same time and it will look like it was built that way. There are many examples here in THE FORUM to show how this can be done properly.

The Square D panels are original, I just took the faces off mine, sanded and primed them, and sprayed them with a nice original color gray and now they look new. Inside there was no deterioration.

When you get to the engines and transmissions then there will be a day of reckoning. On many CC motors the only thing they recommended to do was to drain ALL of the drain points, including those on risers, blocks, pumps, EVERYTHING. By doing this CC knew they designed the drains to avoid freeze pockets in the boat, but I must not speak for your particular installation because it may be different, so you must look and be very careful about how you do this. I would drain the oil in the motors, chances are the oil is still in there and since oil floats on water if you put the drain tube at the bottom of the sump you will soon know if there is any water in there. The good news is if there is a little, since it may be just limited to the bottom perhaps it did not get into the pickup and cause any rust. I guess I would replace the oil too and certainly seal off the tops of the motors to assure you are not getting water seepage into the intake manifolds. If you drain everything down and use a little antifreeze too, you should be good. Beware, antifreeze is toxic to dogs, and it only takes a lick or two to kill one. Use the non toxic stuff.

Some of the generators of this era had a recall for the exhaust manifold, be sure to look at yours to be sure it is in good shape. Also, ANYONE running a generator MUST have a carbon monoxide detector on board......don't ever run one without it. Monoxide builds slowly in the blood stream and then when a person really is not aware they get sleepy and never wake up.

So you have yourself a real project, and I admire your adventure. Go for it. The project may take a year or three, but in the end you'll have a cruiser that is loads of fun and we have many experts here on this forum who can give you assistance on every inch of the boat.

regards,

Paul
Nice looking boat. Looks like a lot of work, but will be worth it when you're done. I really like the lines.
Two recommendations if I may (based on my car restoration experience)
1. Don't underestimate the value of your family/friends as your "support group". There will days that you will sit and stare at your project and wonder what the heck you've gotten yourself in to.. if the family is "on board" with the project, you'll have a lot fewer of those days. Share with them both the ups and downs. We often take this for granted.
2. Because the engines are an unknown, and you suspect water inside, I'd recommend you pull the engines and take them apart before Winter.
It will solve your winterizing issue, and then you'll know what you have to do in the future. No reason you have to rebuild them now unless you want to, but having the knowledge of their condition will put you way ahead. If they're junk, at least you'll know. If they can be saved but have water in them, you take a serious chance of them "crossing that line" before you get to them.
They're pretty much standard GM/Chevy small blocks. Any buddy who works on GM stuff can take one of these motors apart in a couple of hours.

Paul,
Do they make stern davits big enough so he can hang his Bayliner?

Ken
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Joined: October 22nd, 2011, 1:58 am

October 27th, 2011, 6:00 pm #6

I agree that support helps though in the past I've been able to keep going in bad conditions...id be cutting plywood for my Bayliner late at night outside with snow falling, having to brush it off to find where the line was to run my jigsaw on. I wouldn't call it fun but definitely rewarding. At least I shouldn't have to cut and grind glass.

I would pull the engines but I don't have the best facilities anymore...my Bayliner project was done over winter in a heated barn...now I live in an apartment 40 minutes away from the Coho and while I do have access to a small shop its back in Lansing...quite a logistical problem. For the time being I plan on putting fresh oil in number 2 and firing it up long enough to circulate the oil a little, draining, repeating. Hourmeter on number 1 shows 2800 or so, number 2 is over 3400...didn't spend much time at the dock it seems.

And I seriously want to build a larger, heavier duty platform or add davits because I have a 70s Amphicat 6x6 AATV that would serve as an awesome landing craft and make everyone with a dinghy jealous lol

Thanks so far guys
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Paul
Paul

October 28th, 2011, 1:32 pm #7

------->forget the davits
With all the tasks needed to be done, "davits" would be so far down my list as to get moved into another lifetime,

Sorry I didn't mean to rain on the parage, couldn't resist.

best,

Paul
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Joined: October 22nd, 2011, 1:58 am

October 28th, 2011, 1:38 pm #8

I'll get to davits or something for carrying my landing craft lol. I do agree that I have a lot of other more pressing projects on board. That's up there with things like my alcantara headliner, flybridge sink, fridge, and blender, fancy countertops, recessed cup lights...structural, powertrain, safety, and basic cosmetics are my priorities. But until then northing's wrong with thinking up sweet ideas
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Joined: September 14th, 2011, 10:43 pm

October 28th, 2011, 1:51 pm #9

I agree that support helps though in the past I've been able to keep going in bad conditions...id be cutting plywood for my Bayliner late at night outside with snow falling, having to brush it off to find where the line was to run my jigsaw on. I wouldn't call it fun but definitely rewarding. At least I shouldn't have to cut and grind glass.

I would pull the engines but I don't have the best facilities anymore...my Bayliner project was done over winter in a heated barn...now I live in an apartment 40 minutes away from the Coho and while I do have access to a small shop its back in Lansing...quite a logistical problem. For the time being I plan on putting fresh oil in number 2 and firing it up long enough to circulate the oil a little, draining, repeating. Hourmeter on number 1 shows 2800 or so, number 2 is over 3400...didn't spend much time at the dock it seems.

And I seriously want to build a larger, heavier duty platform or add davits because I have a 70s Amphicat 6x6 AATV that would serve as an awesome landing craft and make everyone with a dinghy jealous lol

Thanks so far guys
...to launch an amphibious assault on the local establishment of the "seller of fine spirits" from a Chris Craft. You could drive right up to the door.
If you do that, you really must mount a loudspeaker so you can loudly play Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries" on the way to the beach...

I get chills when I hear of marine engines that are suspected of being wet inside. Same story when I picked up my Lancer with a 283FLV... so pulled the engine immediately so I could figure out my "plan". Sure enough, the engine WAS wet inside... cylinders, oil pan, intake, you name it. Block water passages solid with corrosion and salt deposits as were the exhaust manifolds and risers. Beyond saving for any reasonable amount of effort and money.

[/IMG]



Ken
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Glenn
Glenn

October 28th, 2011, 1:51 pm #10

I'll get to davits or something for carrying my landing craft lol. I do agree that I have a lot of other more pressing projects on board. That's up there with things like my alcantara headliner, flybridge sink, fridge, and blender, fancy countertops, recessed cup lights...structural, powertrain, safety, and basic cosmetics are my priorities. But until then northing's wrong with thinking up sweet ideas
Philip,

I have a list of sweet ideals as long as my arm, but I am starting to prioritize than or I'll never get finished with my 36' Commander.

Great looking boat, it sounds like you will be enjoying the project as well as the ride.

Glenn
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