I think I have a V-Drive converted to I/O

I think I have a V-Drive converted to I/O

Marco
Marco

September 29th, 2017, 1:07 pm #1

Hello everybody,
I'm working on the boat.
I disassembled the ugly swim platform, quite an effort being alone and trying to undo fasteners outside while keeping the nut from rotating on the inside, many bad words wafted through the air...
I started to pull the flooring but hey what an effort!

I'm more and more convinced that this was a v-drive:
I don't know if you can pick it from my poor pictures but on both sides of the transom there are plugs printing through the paint, just where exhaust should be, about 6 inches from the side and just above waterline:
Left side:

Right side:


My footrest has a recess where the steering column should pass to reach this:



Sorry for my elucubrations, don't mean to bore anybody.

Have a nice day,

Marco
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

September 29th, 2017, 2:14 pm #2

Amazing what you can find when you restore an old boat. If it could only talk.....but in a way it is !!!

Regards,
Paul
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Chad
Chad

September 29th, 2017, 3:02 pm #3

Hello everybody,
I'm working on the boat.
I disassembled the ugly swim platform, quite an effort being alone and trying to undo fasteners outside while keeping the nut from rotating on the inside, many bad words wafted through the air...
I started to pull the flooring but hey what an effort!

I'm more and more convinced that this was a v-drive:
I don't know if you can pick it from my poor pictures but on both sides of the transom there are plugs printing through the paint, just where exhaust should be, about 6 inches from the side and just above waterline:
Left side:

Right side:


My footrest has a recess where the steering column should pass to reach this:



Sorry for my elucubrations, don't mean to bore anybody.

Have a nice day,

Marco
The V-drive extends under the rear seat bench through a hole in the bulkhead. That explains the patch that you have covering the hole. You must have one of the early V-drive XKs, as they were transitioning to the I/O. Have you found the hull # on the boat?
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

September 29th, 2017, 3:22 pm #4

Chad, we only have records for the boats built in the US, and there are no complete records for the mechanical packages shipped to Italy. Many of the boats Herb built in Italy used standard engine and transmission packages shipped from the US for installation there, and Herb was also selling motors to Riva as sell, as he grinned at dinner one evening and mentioned he was making a profit off Riva while building Chris-Craft boats (but always contended they were in different markets so there was no real competiton there). We have examples of 427 Ford and small block GM v-drive boats being built in Italy, so it seems they would install whatever motor was avaialable for the best cost, and least amount of man-hours for production, etc.

It is sad Herb is gone, we could ask these questions directly but now we just have to wonder.

regards,
Paul
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Joined: October 15th, 2007, 8:14 am

September 29th, 2017, 3:29 pm #5

The V-drive extends under the rear seat bench through a hole in the bulkhead. That explains the patch that you have covering the hole. You must have one of the early V-drive XKs, as they were transitioning to the I/O. Have you found the hull # on the boat?
I looked under the bow but nothing...
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

September 29th, 2017, 3:39 pm #6

On boats built in the US the ID number was embossed into the gelcoat on the front bow just under the rub rail several inches back on the port side.

The same number was also embossed on the starboard side several inches forward from the transom, again just under the rub rail.

If these are gone due to a previous restoration, they might still be there if you sand very lightly through the paint and filler, unless someone has sanded all the way through.

I do not know if Herb placed the ID numbers in the same manner on the Italian boats that they did here in the US, but that is where I would look very carefully.

regards,
Paul
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Joined: October 15th, 2007, 8:14 am

September 29th, 2017, 4:34 pm #7

I've been lucky with paint stripper sometimes on bikes but I fear it would eat the gelcoat..
Last edited by Mardam on September 29th, 2017, 4:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

September 29th, 2017, 9:17 pm #8

There is a stripper made for fiberglass

Paul
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Joined: October 15th, 2007, 8:14 am

September 30th, 2017, 2:31 pm #9

Amazing what you can find when you restore an old boat. If it could only talk.....but in a way it is !!!

Regards,
Paul
I really like understanding what's the story of a boat, a car or a bike... And researching is my favorite part of the restorations.
Have a nice week end,

Marco
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Thomas
Thomas

October 1st, 2017, 10:12 am #10

I looked under the bow but nothing...
Look for the hull number inside the transom on the port side, it should be glassed in there! At least it was on my 19' Lancer that was built in Italy.
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