Got to love that pointed transom on a 38 Commander

Got to love that pointed transom on a 38 Commander

Paul
Paul

June 11th, 2012, 10:43 pm #1

Here is our TRADITION at the dock, the yellow tape you see is precautionary to keep the tour group from falling into the engine bay. I had the hatch open to show off what a big dog is supposed to look like. People were in awe.



Another photo from the archives


The first time I ever saw a Commander and even knew what one was, was one day when Janet and I were just hanging around a marine for the heck of it, we liked to go by this one and that just to see the boats. We were on one dock and I looked across and saw the bow of a 38 Commander sticking out. I was not sure what it was at the time, but it sure LOOKED like a Chris Craft. So we walked over to take a look and as we walked up to the boat (which was backed in at the time) I was quite frankly pretty darn dumbfounded at how awesome the boat was. That pointed transom is the coolest thing of all, it is not only pointed, it is sloping inward as it approaches the waterline, wow, beautiful. Then as I looked further, I started taking note of the detail around the side scupper drains, etc., and the fluted side panels, I was hooked right there.

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Regards,

Paul
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Joined: December 13th, 2007, 6:09 pm

June 12th, 2012, 5:00 am #2

Hi Paul,
The pointed transoms on these boats remind me a little of the styling on Cadillacs. Especially the new ones, kind of edgy but not boxy looking. One of my favorite features, way ahead of its time.

John Austin
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Paul
Paul

June 12th, 2012, 1:57 pm #3











One day I was sitting at the office and decided to do a google hunt for Fred Hudson to see if he was in fact, still alive. I found an address and phone number and rang him up. I told him I was an architect who had one of his 38 Commander designs and I appreciated the form, proportion, and lines of the boat every time I saw it. He was pretty taken aback, because this was before the video interviews and the spotlighting of his career just before he passed away. At the time he did not seem to know how many people out there still appreciated those lines. So at the time we were talking he said it was A.W.(Bill) Mackerer who came up with the pointed transom idea and he (Fred) liked it too. Fred took credit for the foil design around the aft beltline above the waterline but gave all credit for the pointed transom to Bill, which I thought was pretty classy.

At the time I saw my first 38 Commander I was basically a wood boat runabout guy who had recently moved up to a classic 35' wood lapstrake Sea Skiff Clipper. The Clipper (photo below) was a traditional design and a beautiful boat, but when my eyes saw the 38 Commander at the dock that thing looked like a space ship by comparison. I was hooked right there, eventually tried to buy the boat which turned out to be a Sport Fisherman version of the 38 hull with 427 power, but the guy said over and over that he did not want to sell. Finally he said OK I'll sell it for a hundred thousand dollars. At that point I got the message. Many years later after I had already traded my 35 Sea Skiff for a 38 Commander I found the boat was sitting at the dock for sale. The owner had vanished and I was never able to track him down, so I think he may have retired and moved to Arizona or maybe even passed on to greener pastures.




This Sea Skiff was a great boat. Very truthful and traditional in design and build, and actually very fast with a pair of 327F motors too because it only weighed 12,000 pounds. When I got behind the wheel of a 38 the Commander felt like a barge by comparison because the Skiff handled instantly and the modified v of the Commander and additional weight sure made a lot of difference. I later realized the Commander was more like driving an anvil than an eggshell

best,

Paul
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Eric Jensen
Eric Jensen

June 12th, 2012, 4:41 pm #4

Here is our TRADITION at the dock, the yellow tape you see is precautionary to keep the tour group from falling into the engine bay. I had the hatch open to show off what a big dog is supposed to look like. People were in awe.



Another photo from the archives


The first time I ever saw a Commander and even knew what one was, was one day when Janet and I were just hanging around a marine for the heck of it, we liked to go by this one and that just to see the boats. We were on one dock and I looked across and saw the bow of a 38 Commander sticking out. I was not sure what it was at the time, but it sure LOOKED like a Chris Craft. So we walked over to take a look and as we walked up to the boat (which was backed in at the time) I was quite frankly pretty darn dumbfounded at how awesome the boat was. That pointed transom is the coolest thing of all, it is not only pointed, it is sloping inward as it approaches the waterline, wow, beautiful. Then as I looked further, I started taking note of the detail around the side scupper drains, etc., and the fluted side panels, I was hooked right there.

Here's more




Regards,

Paul
A pointed transom should have some built in advantages when dealing with a following sea. In theory, it avoids placing a buoyant part of the hull out on the edge where the water could lift a corner and cause the boat to bow steer. I don't have any experience handling a 38, let alone in a following sea. I'm curious. How good is this design considered to be in such conditions? Owners?
Eric
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reypas
reypas

June 13th, 2012, 11:38 am #5

I suppose it might help a tiny little bit, but doubt it would really make a difference. In the original "Ocean Star" in Puerto Rico we experienced many following seas as that is what you deal with when heading back from the Virgin Islands back to Puerto Rico. Pointed transom or not, you don't take your chances, and a couple of times I remember being hit by a wave from behind and "the change of course" was not a fun experience--you have to hit the throttle and correct in a hurry.
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ReyPas
ReyPas

June 13th, 2012, 3:08 pm #6

To be clearer, following seas are no joke regardless of the boat you are in. They always need to be taken very seriously.
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