Decking or flooring, as the case may be....

Decking or flooring, as the case may be....

Joined: December 20th, 2007, 5:01 pm

December 29th, 2008, 3:25 am #1

ALL:
I am already dreaming about the 31 footer from Bill in Florida, (Maybe I will call her Dream Girl, if she is not already named!) and up popped the picture of Chris Wade toasting his middle roll on the after deck of Feelgood. The afterdeck appears to be made up of beautiful teak and holly. In this case, it appears Chris used an old saddle blanket for a rug so his captain's chair wouldn't mar the finish. I am not sure what Chris' middle roll is made up of but ... well, it probably came out of a can, much like mine did. LOL. But I am getting off the point here.

Paul has showcased a number of beautiful jobs on flooring or decking. I am not sure what the correct nautical term is, maybe the decking is made up of teak and holly flooring. Anyway, it got me to wondering about the correct way to lay flooring for both outside, and below decks, in the galley area. Some photos show the fiberglass deck completely removed and new wood layed for the flooring to lay on. That I can figure out. I also noted that Chris had laid paneling against the side of the cockpit that really accented the whole show, along with the varnished steps on the ladder to the bridge. How was the paneling attached to the sides of the cockpit?

It is the flooring layed on top of the fiberglass that has me wondering how to do it, if indeed that is how it is done. I don't want to cut the fiberglass deck out. I see several diasasters just waiting to happen between the seasons of the year and the amount of rain, snow, saltwater, and humidity. Feelgood has a nice canvas over this area. Two of the outside afterdeck hatches on the Summer Palace have swollen and the fiberglass burst because of the corrusion of the aluminum strengthening bars inside. I don't know about Bill's boat, but will find out soon enough. I also have a sailboat that needs flooring below. There is plywood there now that had been covered with a rug-like material. That needs to be fixed. Fitting the hatches or bilge boards is problematical also in all cases. How do I fix this?
Jerry at the point of the spear.
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Paul
Paul

December 31st, 2008, 4:47 am #2

Jerry,

I laughed out loud when I read your post the first time, the part about "toasting his mid roll", ha ha. That is hilarious, and I laughed again this eve when I saw it again.

I can't give you any advice on doing the aft decking thing, have not ever done it, therefore can't give any advice. I believe Chris on the other hand, has done it, and it looks very good. I'm pleased to say I saw it in person and it looks awesome. Matt has also done the upper helm re-do with teak, and that is stunning too. If you look in the MASTER INDEX files under "TEAK" you'll see a posting about teak decks, one of which is from Patrick McCrary (with his personl permission).

We recently got some good info from Jim Peters, and his teak looks awesome too, so he would be a great source of info for you.

In the interim.............here's some info from our archives.

Here's that crazy Patrick


Here's the reference thread
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1126631201

There will be a pop quiz in the morning.

Regards,

Paul
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 3:42 am

December 31st, 2008, 4:48 am #3

ALL:
I am already dreaming about the 31 footer from Bill in Florida, (Maybe I will call her Dream Girl, if she is not already named!) and up popped the picture of Chris Wade toasting his middle roll on the after deck of Feelgood. The afterdeck appears to be made up of beautiful teak and holly. In this case, it appears Chris used an old saddle blanket for a rug so his captain's chair wouldn't mar the finish. I am not sure what Chris' middle roll is made up of but ... well, it probably came out of a can, much like mine did. LOL. But I am getting off the point here.

Paul has showcased a number of beautiful jobs on flooring or decking. I am not sure what the correct nautical term is, maybe the decking is made up of teak and holly flooring. Anyway, it got me to wondering about the correct way to lay flooring for both outside, and below decks, in the galley area. Some photos show the fiberglass deck completely removed and new wood layed for the flooring to lay on. That I can figure out. I also noted that Chris had laid paneling against the side of the cockpit that really accented the whole show, along with the varnished steps on the ladder to the bridge. How was the paneling attached to the sides of the cockpit?

It is the flooring layed on top of the fiberglass that has me wondering how to do it, if indeed that is how it is done. I don't want to cut the fiberglass deck out. I see several diasasters just waiting to happen between the seasons of the year and the amount of rain, snow, saltwater, and humidity. Feelgood has a nice canvas over this area. Two of the outside afterdeck hatches on the Summer Palace have swollen and the fiberglass burst because of the corrusion of the aluminum strengthening bars inside. I don't know about Bill's boat, but will find out soon enough. I also have a sailboat that needs flooring below. There is plywood there now that had been covered with a rug-like material. That needs to be fixed. Fitting the hatches or bilge boards is problematical also in all cases. How do I fix this?
Jerry at the point of the spear.
Hi Jerry,
A bit of clarification about the construction of the 38'Commander Sportfish model.



When I replaced the original fuel tanks with new stainless steel ones. I completely gutted the aft cockpit which was of teak, but in a serious state of disrepair. The only thing left was the 8"ish wide coaming that is part of the deck molds and behind that I left intact a bit framed structure (of white oak and mahogany) around the hull that I assume was factory original. I haven't been able to confirm this on another sportfish because they are few and far between. I don't know of another one on the Great Lakes. From the pictures I have studied in the Chris Craft brochures and pictures of other SF's for sale on line (there are still a few out there), here is what I believe to be true. The aft deck, which was about an 8" step down from the wheel house, and the deck of the aforementioned wheel house were plywood with a Nautalex vinyl covering. And the ceiling boards (vertical panels that go around the aft cockpit) were plywood. This presented a restoration project to which I could apply my carpentry skills.

The reason for this long winded narrative is to assure you that I didn't "laminate" teak & holy plywood over any fiberglass. I am guessing ,but that would be a sure fire recipe for disaster IMO. I think I have a suggestion for your 38' though. How about we replace the blown up original deck hatches with ones fabricated from teak. You would retain the durable and structural capabilities of the fiberglass cockpit mold and add some teak for a touch of class. I can imagine a couple different ways to execute this which would present differing styles. More would have to be known about your plannes for canvas and such. Actually a boat house would do the trick, one with guest quarters for visiting amature boat wrights and other Commander dignitaries!

Gotta go now. The last 8 minutes of this Cowboys vs Ducks games proves to be interesting.

Yours Truly, Chris Wade
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 3:42 am

December 31st, 2008, 1:52 pm #4

While I was writing my post in response to the teak decking query, the moderator read my mind and realized I needed a little schooling. After posting my thoughts I went back to the forum and the post from Paul was up. I read the post on installing a teak deck on a 53'? and it made me think.....I guess I have seen a bunch of mega yachts with teak decks or teak transoms and other stuff. I think there are even a couple of 38's in Michigan City that have teak decks that might be over fiberglass. I suppose there must be a viable method of doing this. However I would be surprised if the mega yacht builders worry as much about maintenance and longevity as we all do. There clientele can afford to refit and refinish whenever needed.

I guess the no-no of glassing over a leaking or weak wood hull, has confused my logic. The school of though of that topic is somewhat confused as well. Fiberglass and wood don't expand and contract at the same rate or to the same degree. But, many hulls were saved for future restoration that might have other wise been destroyed. I have heard that the Sierra Boat Co. in Tahoe actually did alot of this.

I guess where there's a will, someone will find a way. Just buy a bunch of teak for your Commanders and we'll figure it out as we go $$$$$ $$$$$

cw
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E.Sanchez
E.Sanchez

December 31st, 2008, 3:35 pm #5

Hi Jerry,
A bit of clarification about the construction of the 38'Commander Sportfish model.



When I replaced the original fuel tanks with new stainless steel ones. I completely gutted the aft cockpit which was of teak, but in a serious state of disrepair. The only thing left was the 8"ish wide coaming that is part of the deck molds and behind that I left intact a bit framed structure (of white oak and mahogany) around the hull that I assume was factory original. I haven't been able to confirm this on another sportfish because they are few and far between. I don't know of another one on the Great Lakes. From the pictures I have studied in the Chris Craft brochures and pictures of other SF's for sale on line (there are still a few out there), here is what I believe to be true. The aft deck, which was about an 8" step down from the wheel house, and the deck of the aforementioned wheel house were plywood with a Nautalex vinyl covering. And the ceiling boards (vertical panels that go around the aft cockpit) were plywood. This presented a restoration project to which I could apply my carpentry skills.

The reason for this long winded narrative is to assure you that I didn't "laminate" teak & holy plywood over any fiberglass. I am guessing ,but that would be a sure fire recipe for disaster IMO. I think I have a suggestion for your 38' though. How about we replace the blown up original deck hatches with ones fabricated from teak. You would retain the durable and structural capabilities of the fiberglass cockpit mold and add some teak for a touch of class. I can imagine a couple different ways to execute this which would present differing styles. More would have to be known about your plannes for canvas and such. Actually a boat house would do the trick, one with guest quarters for visiting amature boat wrights and other Commander dignitaries!

Gotta go now. The last 8 minutes of this Cowboys vs Ducks games proves to be interesting.

Yours Truly, Chris Wade
Chris,I noticed your fuel tanks have fuel level sensors and if I remember correctly you don t have inspection hatches to have access to replace them when they go bust,I m wrong?
I m in the planning phase to replace tanks and I don t know what to do about an access to service the sending units given that I prefer not to install hatches thus disturbing the originality of the deck.From all the pictures of Commander s decks I have seeing I haven t noticed any hatches on deck and I assume some must have changed their fuel tanks and gone to electrical fuel gauges.Any ideas?
Thanks and happy new year
Eduardo
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Joined: December 20th, 2007, 5:01 pm

January 1st, 2009, 8:36 am #6

Eduardo:
My 1964 FXA 0048 38' Express has circular dedicated inspection hatches placed directly on top of the fuel tanks where the original wiring and fuel exit lines entered and/or exited. They are original, because they do not fit just right on the newer fuel tanks that are there now. Inspection ports are prudent thinking and add value to a boat, not take away.
Jerry
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anonymous
anonymous

January 1st, 2009, 7:16 pm #7

Thanks Jerry
Happy new year
Eduardo
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Paul
Paul

January 2nd, 2009, 4:47 am #8

Eduardo:
My 1964 FXA 0048 38' Express has circular dedicated inspection hatches placed directly on top of the fuel tanks where the original wiring and fuel exit lines entered and/or exited. They are original, because they do not fit just right on the newer fuel tanks that are there now. Inspection ports are prudent thinking and add value to a boat, not take away.
Jerry
Here is TRADITION ( 1966 38 Express ) the day after a major evening cruise, fully decked out with chairs. You can see the inspection ports in the center of the open deck in front of the side chairs.



Regards,

Paul
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E.Sanchez
E.Sanchez

January 2nd, 2009, 1:07 pm #9

Thanks Paul,the 35 Commander 1968 I have doesn t have them on deck,and since the fiberglass decks surface is molded to resemble wood slats any inspection port I place there is going to stand out more than usual I wonder if any 35s owner has found a solution.
Regards
Eduardo
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Kevin
Kevin

January 2nd, 2009, 5:05 pm #10

One thing I like about modern boats are the built in couches/benches they have at the rear of the boat, and other places. It allows better, quick, seating and a place to take a nap The chairs have to be stored and pulled out when needed. The down side of couches is that if there are too many, it takes up all the floor space so people and kids can not move about, knees always colliding. It would also be neat if they could be made into beds for outdoor beds for those hot nights here in Annapolis.

I suspect that the reason may be the access of hatches, etc.

Any ideas on this subject?

Kevin
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