* Classic Boating Magazine salutes fiberglass boats, Sept/October 2011

* Classic Boating Magazine salutes fiberglass boats, Sept/October 2011

Paul
Paul

September 14th, 2011, 10:14 pm #1

Anyone who has been around this forum for very long has undoubtedly seen our front page with a reference to Classic Boating Magazine.
In case you have not, here is that linhttp://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1134771604

Last night I was suprised to see an article I wrote 4 years ago for Classic Boating, appear in this latest edition! I honestly just about
fell out of my chair. Today I called Norm Wangard and thanked him for doing such a nice job, and we got a chance to talk about antique and
classic boating in general, and how the hobby is endangered due to a normal attritiion rate on older wood boats, and an attrition rate on
ourselves too. Classic Boating has always given good coverage to fiberglass boats, and basically ALL boats from wood, metal, fiberglass,
regardless of brand, but today in 2011 it is a real boost because there is a quiet "revolution" of sorts, with the appreciation factor for
these classic fiberglass Chris Craft boats increasing at a much faster rate than ever before.

Here is the article hot off the press, for your reading enjoyment. If you are an avid classic boater, regardless of the marque you subscribe
to, you should really consider getting on the mailing list for this bi-monthly publication. Their attention to quality is remarkable, except
for the fact of course, that they let me in, ha!











See the next 5 pages in the next posting..........................................

Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 8:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

September 14th, 2011, 10:22 pm #2












This article was written in 2007, and you will note in the text it says my 1966 boat is 41 years old.
The article was most probably the stimulus for publishing the first edition of THE LEGACY OF THE FIBERGLASS CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER,
and that is one reason Norm and Jim Wangard and their publication is called out on two pages of that book as "contributors".

It is fun to be able to share information like this, especially when it is with a focus group (like classic boaters) who are so friendly,
and in the case of Norm and Jim in particular, such classy professionals. Thanks Norm, thanks Jim, you did a very nice job presenting
what came to you in text format. I thought the layout and photo selection was great.

Regards,

Paul
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Ben
Ben

September 15th, 2011, 2:04 am #3

Nice work Paul...definitely deserves a nomination for Photo of the day.




Ben
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Paul
Paul

September 15th, 2011, 2:50 pm #4

Thanks for the good words.

Paul
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Kevin Baerg
Kevin Baerg

September 19th, 2011, 1:50 pm #5












This article was written in 2007, and you will note in the text it says my 1966 boat is 41 years old.
The article was most probably the stimulus for publishing the first edition of THE LEGACY OF THE FIBERGLASS CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER,
and that is one reason Norm and Jim Wangard and their publication is called out on two pages of that book as "contributors".

It is fun to be able to share information like this, especially when it is with a focus group (like classic boaters) who are so friendly,
and in the case of Norm and Jim in particular, such classy professionals. Thanks Norm, thanks Jim, you did a very nice job presenting
what came to you in text format. I thought the layout and photo selection was great.

Regards,

Paul
Nicely done Paul - I really enjoyed reading it and hearing your passion for these stout and beautiful classics!
Kevin
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Paul
Paul

September 19th, 2011, 2:32 pm #6

I apprecite the good works, Kevin. The Wangard boys are fun to hang out with. They let me drive the photo boat down at
Mt. Dora for three years in a row, and it was a cough, cough, Rinker. Ah well, being a photo boat driver sounds romantic,
but all you really have to do is keep the bow pointed into the sun so all the photos taken off the back deck have the sun
at the backs of the photographer!

Best,

Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 8:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Norm
Norm

September 21st, 2011, 4:00 pm #7












This article was written in 2007, and you will note in the text it says my 1966 boat is 41 years old.
The article was most probably the stimulus for publishing the first edition of THE LEGACY OF THE FIBERGLASS CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER,
and that is one reason Norm and Jim Wangard and their publication is called out on two pages of that book as "contributors".

It is fun to be able to share information like this, especially when it is with a focus group (like classic boaters) who are so friendly,
and in the case of Norm and Jim in particular, such classy professionals. Thanks Norm, thanks Jim, you did a very nice job presenting
what came to you in text format. I thought the layout and photo selection was great.

Regards,

Paul
G'day Paul,

Super report! Reading it reminds me of a car brochure, which are designed not so much to sell cars, but to reaffirm to the purchaser
that they made the right decision.

Chris Craft got it right - right down to the non-porous gelcoat which shines up as bright today.

Modern builders can't afford to get it all so right with the exception of very few crafts, which are at the highest end of the market.
Hinkley, Tiara and Riviera would be the modern equivalent in my eyes.

Boat builders go bust on a regular basis - Riviera just fought back from the brink of bankruptcy and Tiara have had to branched out to
build wind turbines. You build a real boat and people can't afford it so profit margins take a hit or keep your profit margins and build
an inferior boat - same result - you won't survive.

By the mid to late 70's Chris Craft changed direction and it can be seen in the models of that later era. The Commanders are a very rare
breed.

I can't ever see anyone spending six-figures-plus recycling a Bayliner or modern Sea-Ray Sun Cancer.






Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 8:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

September 21st, 2011, 4:39 pm #8

Norm, as usual, I agree totally with your comments:

"Modern builders can't afford to get it all so right with the exception of very few crafts, which are at
the highest end of the market. Hinkley, Tiara and Riviera would be the modern equivalent in my eyes.

Boat builders go bust on a regular basis - Riviera just fought back from the brink of bankruptcy and Tiara have had
to branched out to build wind turbines. You build a real boat and people can't afford it so profit margins take a hit
or keep your profit margins and build an inferior boat - same result - you won't survive."


The early Commanders are TREMENDOUS values.
For instance, my 1966 model has (if you can believe this) SOLID MAHOGANY interior. Yes, it has some high grade mahogany
veneer on the flatwork, but some of those boards are solid mahogany, and even the lumber that holds the sink in place is
solid mahogany. Who could afford to build a 38 like that today for under a half million dollars?

















As the owner of a 35' Chris Craft Sea Skiff at the time, when I saw the interior of this fiberglass Commander I about
flipped. It was somewhat ratty however, as a previous owner had over-varnished everything with a dirty brush, but thankfully
the top coat of varnish was carefully sanded and refinished as you see it in these photos with about ten coats of wipe on
polyurethane furniture finish......it did a fabulous job by the way, no deterioration in 10 years.

Regards,

Best to ya out there in BC !!

Paul



Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 8:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

September 21st, 2011, 4:51 pm #9

The 1967 38 Express and Sedan were the last years of the solid mahogany interiors. The 1968 boats and beyond are still
"all Chris Craft", they are great boats, I would love to own any number of them, but I sure appreciate the old style
craftsmanship that existed in 1964, 1965, 1966, and 1967 when Chris Craft was establishing the Commander line and was
courting their wood boat followers to buy fiberglass. It worked on me!

The granite counter you see in the previous post was added by yours truely of course, it is not what CC put into their boats.
I also added the Force 10 range, as our original Princess was totally trashed and the door would slam down while under way
making the Captain very nervous. As a result, all batteries are mounted on the Starboard side of the boat, and they almost
compensate for this stone work. Note we took extreme care to make the range top flush with the granite, details like that
don't just happen.


Now fast forward to 1968, two years later. The fiberglass hulls are still extremely good, the power options are awesome, but
the interior trim work is now going to formica. While this may have been marketed as a low maintenance finish, and while it
is serviceable and reasonably well done, it is simply no substitute for solid mahogany!










In some regards, the white wall on the forward bulkhead helps bring light into the interior, and some of the later models
(1970) used a light wood grain formica that gave a much brighter interior feel. However, still no substitute for solid mahogany!


Regards,
Paul








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TomNicholas
TomNicholas

October 4th, 2011, 12:58 am #10

Anyone who has been around this forum for very long has undoubtedly seen our front page with a reference to Classic Boating Magazine.
In case you have not, here is that linhttp://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1134771604

Last night I was suprised to see an article I wrote 4 years ago for Classic Boating, appear in this latest edition! I honestly just about
fell out of my chair. Today I called Norm Wangard and thanked him for doing such a nice job, and we got a chance to talk about antique and
classic boating in general, and how the hobby is endangered due to a normal attritiion rate on older wood boats, and an attrition rate on
ourselves too. Classic Boating has always given good coverage to fiberglass boats, and basically ALL boats from wood, metal, fiberglass,
regardless of brand, but today in 2011 it is a real boost because there is a quiet "revolution" of sorts, with the appreciation factor for
these classic fiberglass Chris Craft boats increasing at a much faster rate than ever before.

Here is the article hot off the press, for your reading enjoyment. If you are an avid classic boater, regardless of the marque you subscribe
to, you should really consider getting on the mailing list for this bi-monthly publication. Their attention to quality is remarkable, except
for the fact of course, that they let me in, ha!











See the next 5 pages in the next posting..........................................
Congratulations Paul,

This evening I was greeted with September October 2011 edition of Classic Boating when I arrived home from work. Wonderful job
on the magazine article. It was especially gratifying to have two Commander Owners yourself and Tony Molica with featured articles
in the same magazine edition. I still remember and have a copy of your Sea Skiff article from the 1990s.

We had a great summer cruising US and Canadian waters. Unfortunately our season is coming to an end quickly. We cruised by Tonys
island a few times however we didnt connect up with him. On one occasion he noticed our boat on St Lawrence River while he was
preparing for the opening of his show on the history of the Hutchinson Boat Company at a local museum in Alexandria Bay.

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