* Chris Craft Power

* Chris Craft Power

Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 9:54 pm #1

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 16th, 2012, 9:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 9:55 pm #2















Regards,

Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on April 14th, 2015, 5:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 9:57 pm #3

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul




Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 10:06 pm #4

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul




Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 10:11 pm #5

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul




Regards,

Paul


(Note, upon close examination of the original document, the valve cover said "327Q and 235-hp". The 350 is listed as the same power rating.

In addition, although the 327 was a great motor in its own right, it's basically a larger 283. The 350 is also a larger 283, but it's the first of the 4-bolt main small blocks!
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 10:12 pm #6

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul




Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 10:14 pm #7

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul










(Below): What all 427 motors should look like, from a 35' Commander. Looks like a museum piece, eh? Beautiful !!


Here is the very first notification of the new 427 motor by Chris Craft, in December of 1965.
Commanders got the 427 for the 1966 model year.











Here is Keith Ferrio's beautiful rebuild, from his 1967 31' Sports Express







Guys.............Here is a cool parts list for the 427 thanks to Keith Ferrio !
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/t ... +reference



Regards,

Paul



Last edited by FEfinaticP on April 14th, 2015, 7:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 10:15 pm #8

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul




Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

February 22nd, 2007, 10:16 pm #9

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul




Regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

February 24th, 2007, 10:55 am #10

Chris Craft built their own motors from scratch back in the old days of the A-120. Those motors had something like 800 cubic inches and 250-hp, and they weighed enough to anchor the Queen Mary II.

Later as flathead four and six cylinder motors became commonplace, as manufactured by Chrysler, Graymarine, and Hercules, Chris Craft turned to the Hercules brand for their main power options.

In 1959 CC introduced the 283 Chevy motor, soon to become the 327 and the trend continues today with lightweight V8 small block power that produces superb power to weight.

Here are some of the options from the 1970 Chris Craft "POWER" brochure, compliments of Robert DaPron.

Regards, Paul
The Q motor series represents some very sweet running small block Chevys. Everything from the 283 up through the 350 represent essentially the same block.

Naturally there are some internal changes over the years, but it's quite hard to tell these engines from one another simply by looking at the blocks, because they're externally the same.


Here are some comparisons with the early series of Chevy SBC motors.

283F
185 hp at 4000 RPM
261 ft. lbs. torque at 3000 RPM
Bore 3-7/8"
Stroke 3"
Compression ratio 8.0:1

327F
210 hp at 4000 RPM
302 ft. lbs. torque at 2600 RPM
Bore 4"
Stroke 3-1/4"
Compression ratio 8.0:1

307Q
200 hp at 4000 RPM
280 ft. lbs. torque at 3100 RPM
Bore 3-7/8"
Stroke 3-1/4"
Compression ratio 8.1:1

350Q
235 hp at 4000 RPM
330 ft. lbs. torque at 3100 RPM
Bore 4.00"
Stroke 3.5"
Compression ratio 8.8:1

The interesting thing about the 307Q, is it's an ever so slightly stroked 283 with a hint of a compression boost. The result of this, along with some improvements in the intake design, produce an additional 15 hp and 21 footpounds of torque over the highly thought of 283.

The 350Q is rated at a relaxed 235 hp and produces a healthy torque rating. These engines are built to last, and a 350 can produce 350-hp with ease, but it probably wouldn't last as long in the marine environment as the one Chris Craft specified.

What a great line of small V8 options. I have two 327 motors right now, one that is semi hot rodded in a 17' wood Chris Craft at around 300-hp, and another in my recently acquired 20' fiberglass Sea Skiff, which has 8.5:1 compression because it's an automotive block conversion. Automotive horsepower rating of this motor was 250, and it is not known what sort of power it produces in it's present form. Performance runs may help estimate this later when we see what kind of prop it will spin. They're all able to be interchanged, with some attention to the rear seals and some other details.

One important internal change that occurred with the advent of the 350 is the 4-bolt main bearing caps. The 327 series didn't have the 4-bolt mains, and it is not known at this time whether or not the contemporary 307Q also got the 4-bolt mains when this feature was added to the 350. The feature isn't really needed in our use of this engine series, but it just makes a good engine better.




Below: The first 283 small block Chevy motor used in a Chris Craft, circa 1959, one beautiful running compact V8 motor.


Here is a 283 with an alternator. Early versions had a generator and the shaft of the generator also had a dog that mated up with the 4-port water pump, so the generator shaft actually was running the water pump too.


Early versions of the 283 did not have a thermostat.
Here is a later version of the 283F and 327F which did have a thermostat.




Note the 3-pass exhaust manifolds on the early 283. I have one of these setups in my 1956 17' Sportsman Utility!

Photos below are 283H (hydraulic transmission), which also has updated alternator rather than generator





















These little 283 motors are really cool and go very well in vintage Chris-Craft boats that formerly had a Hercules motor. I know because I've done it, and in many cases the motor will sit right onto the exact same stringers as the Hercules. They made the 283 to fit the same stringers, because when it first came out it was an option, you could have Hercules flathead power or the 283

Note just turn downs and no risers, and the alternator is either a later model or one that has been converted from generator to alternator.


Here is a 283 CC motor on a 1937 Hacker-Craft owned by Mike Flood.
Nice compact installation, and I like the choice of single exhaust on this boat.




Regards,
Paul












Last edited by FEfinaticP on January 26th, 2016, 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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