* Another Italian Chris Craft

* Another Italian Chris Craft

Mario Rakic
Mario Rakic

June 29th, 2010, 4:11 pm #1

I got one rare Chris Craft from factory Fiumicino (Italy).

I live in Croatia, and now I got this boat. Last 20 years the boat is in
Croatia, before that I dont know. I also do not know much information
about it. In attach is picture, so maybe it is interesting for take it
on forum. I will send you also new picture, when I go in cottage. And,
the last, your forum is somthing really great, great.

With kind regards, Mario Rakic

Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 17th, 2012, 4:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Paul
Paul

June 29th, 2010, 5:36 pm #2

First of all a big "WELCOME ABOARD" to you. You're the first person I recall posting from Croatia and we're glad to have you here on The Forum. Your boat was most certainly built under the direction of Herb Pocklington, who opened the factory in Italy and then ran the European operations of Chris Craft for many years thereafter (see photo below).


http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... Connection

Your boat is a totally unique model, I have never seen anything like it before. It appears to be on a 19 or 23' Lancer hull bottom, and the topsides are unique, probably a Dick Avery design that Herb commissioned for the Italian market. The Lancer hulls have a very steep deep V deadrise at the transom and they are very good rough water boats as a result. Send more photos! What kind of power does it have?

regards,

Paul
Quote
Share

John Kloka
John Kloka

June 29th, 2010, 8:27 pm #3

I got one rare Chris Craft from factory Fiumicino (Italy).

I live in Croatia, and now I got this boat. Last 20 years the boat is in
Croatia, before that I dont know. I also do not know much information
about it. In attach is picture, so maybe it is interesting for take it
on forum. I will send you also new picture, when I go in cottage. And,
the last, your forum is somthing really great, great.

With kind regards, Mario Rakic

Mama Mia, that is so cool... gotta be the 23 hull with yet another deck on it. They got their money's worth out of that hull!

Oddly... I'm suddenly hungry for pasta...
Quote
Share

Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

June 30th, 2010, 9:14 am #4

bring on the putanesca and valpolicella, maybe little Italian diesel fume too? Sort of a spice forward, organic, dark cherry, with cedar overtones, nice legs, good finish, cellars well. Boats are a lot like wine, many good choices! I'm curious to see what power Herb put in this one for the European market.

Paul
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 30th, 2010, 9:45 am

June 30th, 2010, 9:51 am #5

First of all a big "WELCOME ABOARD" to you. You're the first person I recall posting from Croatia and we're glad to have you here on The Forum. Your boat was most certainly built under the direction of Herb Pocklington, who opened the factory in Italy and then ran the European operations of Chris Craft for many years thereafter (see photo below).


http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... Connection

Your boat is a totally unique model, I have never seen anything like it before. It appears to be on a 19 or 23' Lancer hull bottom, and the topsides are unique, probably a Dick Avery design that Herb commissioned for the Italian market. The Lancer hulls have a very steep deep V deadrise at the transom and they are very good rough water boats as a result. Send more photos! What kind of power does it have?

regards,

Paul
Hi,

There is a Volvo Penta 200D (Chris Craft 307QLV). And that motor was out of function last 10years, it was just stay ina garden. This spring I tried to alive him, and now I will see how would it work (on Adriatic sea). There was a little problem with starter (now I buy a new one, Arco, from US, and one one my friend wil be bring me that). Now it is work condition, but I tried it only on minutes or two (because I did not connect the water, yet). This week I will post a new picture. Inside of boat I also do a new deck, and seats. If you got any good advice for that motor, and any problems which I can expect it, please, let me know.

Mario
Quote
Like
Share

Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

June 30th, 2010, 12:57 pm #6

Hello Mario,

If the boat has been run in salt water and set up for ten years, internal corrosion could be a factor. The block should be thick and tough enough to most likely be okay because it is a high grade iron. The exhaust logs and risers (if so equipped) will be highly suspect if they were in the salt. All of those parts are still available but would be expensive to ship due to weight.

You were wise to not run the motor long, as the rubber impeller (if hooked to the belt drive) will heat up fast and destroy itself. The intake manifold is also iron, and the Q series motors are the only small block Chevrolet motors using this odd intake. If it rusts out it can pressurize your oil sump and you would see a lot of internal pressure coming out the breather along with drivability problems. New or recycled intake manifolds are also available but they are also a bit expensive.

The 307 Q is basically a tweaked 283, and both are very fine motors with good durability. The Q is a bit more trouble on the issue I noted but if you have the owners manual it is quite easy to work on and repair if needed. It is nowhere as difficult as many other marine motors I would suspect you may encounter.

Good luck with the boat. If you run it with a hose, be sure the hose pressure does not overpressure the system and find a rust hole somewhere and fill the cylinder or oil sump with water. The systems are designed to handle something like 10 PSI but the water pressure you may be using on the hose may be 60 PSI or more so it is always best to have the water being drawn from a bucket, while the hose fills the bucket without being directly hooked to the motor.

Tom
Quote
Share

Joined: June 30th, 2010, 9:45 am

June 30th, 2010, 1:52 pm #7

Tnx ona answer. Evrything you said is perfectly true. Yes, I did not run it at a long time (five times, by one or two minutes)... belt wasn't hooked. I didn't took off intake manifolds, but I saw a rusts at the end (on tube for water). Could it possible to happen a hydro-lock? and should I tried rotate it with screwdriver every time before I start it? This summer i do not have a time, but on the autumn i will think about a new manifolds...

mario
Quote
Like
Share

Paul
Paul

July 1st, 2010, 9:59 pm #8

I echo Tom's comments here, pretty good info. As for your concerns about hydrolock, I would run the motor as it should be run, with an intake hose leading to the bucket as Tom described, with the belt attached so the water pump is working and priming and sending water through the motor. I would not pressurize the motor with the domestic city water line, as this could force water into the motor if you have a bad exhaust system, as Tom notes.

At this point I think I'd drop a hose in a bucket and run the motor to see what I had. If it steams badly on one side or another, then you know the exhaust manifold is bad. Proceed carefully with this old rusty iron. It may look bad and be perfectly good, or it may look bad and be totally rotted inside, as I have seen both conditions.

regards,

Paul
Quote
Share

Joined: June 30th, 2010, 9:45 am

July 1st, 2010, 10:34 pm #9

Tnx on answer. I think I will do, just like you said. If there is no problem after few times, and after one or two days with water in system, then I go to the sea (abot 200km away). I plan to drive it max. 1 hour per day.. and max. 10days. That will be enough for this season. Than will I do the nest step (which depends on situation on the sea)... I just do not want to stay on the sea with broken engine.

regards, mario
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

July 2nd, 2010, 3:18 pm #10

bring on the putanesca and valpolicella, maybe little Italian diesel fume too? Sort of a spice forward, organic, dark cherry, with cedar overtones, nice legs, good finish, cellars well. Boats are a lot like wine, many good choices! I'm curious to see what power Herb put in this one for the European market.

Paul

This boat has the same potmetal clamshells as my 1966 20' Sea Skiff, which were also used on some of the Corsair boats and perhaps Lancers too. they are prone to pitting and the repair is expensive. To repair one must fine a shop familiar with flame soldering. The piece must have all the chrome removed in the vat and the pitted places chemically cleaned out first. Once stripped, the piece must be flame soldered to fill all the pitting, and then it must be "sanded" or faired gently to achieve a nice finish. Here in the US this would cost $175 each to refinish, as I got that quote from two shops who do high quality work of this nature. You could repair these (if, indeed, they are pitted at all) with other material and then paint them white as I have seen some boats do with servicable results.

I am curious about the interior, so please do send photos. In the meantime, I am sending this photo to Herb Pocklington asking him what this is, and if he recalls seeing this model on his list of boats being sold in Europe.

Regards, best,

Paul
Quote
Like
Share