35 Sport Cruiser Hull # and fuel tanks...

35 Sport Cruiser Hull # and fuel tanks...

John Kloka
John Kloka

October 8th, 2010, 4:33 pm #1

I'm in the early stages of "considering" a particular 35 Sport Cruiser that "may be" available. I'm a bit rusty on deciphering the hull #, as it has been a while since I've actually "owned" a commander! The # is:
FDA 3520 17 H. I know it's a Holland boat, but after that, I'm lost. I anyone can help, I would truly appreciate it...

Also... The fuel tanks are bad. Can they be replaced through the lazarette in this model, or do they have to go forward??



Now, for my "Big Plans"...

I would like to de-bridge this boat and take out the sliding glass doors and have a big honkin day boat. With no bridge, do you think I would have to add support for the top, like an upright pole on either sie?

Any and all input, even from the Lendzion Boys, is greatl appreciated!!

John Kloka
"Klokanuts"
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Paul
Paul

October 8th, 2010, 4:53 pm #2

FDA 3520 17 H

FDA-35-001 to FDA-35-090 were built in 1969
FDA-35-2001 to FDA-35-2074 were built in 1970, 1971, and 1972, with no differentiation as to year.
Since this is number 17 out of 74 hulls built, it is probably a 1970 boat, especially since they produced 90 boats in 1969.

That's my guess! Don't know about the tanks.

Regarding the comment about debridging the boat, I don't understand the concept of removing the (flying bridge) and adding support. It would appear if you removed the bridge, the roof of the boat would be plenty strong. Maybe I'm just not understanding what you are intending. In any case, hey things are looking up if you're getting back in a real boat!

Paul
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anonymous
anonymous

October 8th, 2010, 5:02 pm #3

Well, my intent would be to also remove the glass sliding door to salon aswell, leaving salon wide open to cockpit. Wondering if sliding door frame provides any support for top, and if I would somehow need to add additional support upon removing the door... My guess would be NO, but I thought I would throw it out there for discussion...

John Kloka
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Brian Tait
Brian Tait

October 8th, 2010, 6:02 pm #4

I own a 1971 SC which has a pole centered inside the sliding doors to add additional support to the center of the roo but if your removing the bridge and dont intend to be up the I suppose it would work?
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Paul
Paul

October 8th, 2010, 6:06 pm #5

Well, my intent would be to also remove the glass sliding door to salon aswell, leaving salon wide open to cockpit. Wondering if sliding door frame provides any support for top, and if I would somehow need to add additional support upon removing the door... My guess would be NO, but I thought I would throw it out there for discussion...

John Kloka
I'd think "no" is the correct answer too, since that top is reinforced so heavily now, just removal of the sliding glass assembly would most likely not remove anything needed to just hold the roof up, especially if you're not going to have five or six people up there any more.




Paul
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Joined: August 21st, 2009, 12:29 pm

October 8th, 2010, 11:19 pm #6

What have you done to my yacht? Blasphemous! You're going to start rumors. hahahaha btw, I don't think there's any way the fuel tanks would come out through the cockpit hatch. Cutting the cockpit out is the only way I can figure those things could be removed - going forward could be a possibility, but I tend to doubt it.
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Mike Watson
Mike Watson

October 9th, 2010, 1:59 am #7

I'm in the early stages of "considering" a particular 35 Sport Cruiser that "may be" available. I'm a bit rusty on deciphering the hull #, as it has been a while since I've actually "owned" a commander! The # is:
FDA 3520 17 H. I know it's a Holland boat, but after that, I'm lost. I anyone can help, I would truly appreciate it...

Also... The fuel tanks are bad. Can they be replaced through the lazarette in this model, or do they have to go forward??



Now, for my "Big Plans"...

I would like to de-bridge this boat and take out the sliding glass doors and have a big honkin day boat. With no bridge, do you think I would have to add support for the top, like an upright pole on either sie?

Any and all input, even from the Lendzion Boys, is greatl appreciated!!

John Kloka
"Klokanuts"
Our boat, FDA350001H, also has the center pole support. I have pulled this out when pulling engines and it is supporting weight. To get it out or in I have either used a piston jack or someone big and tall enough to push up. The jack works best. It does sag a little bit even as solid as it is. Maybe it is just because it is hull number one and they figured some things out later. I would also suggest you look at the beam below the doors at the step. Mine has been repaired at one time from water getting in and rotting the beam. I've avoided looking too deep.

On the inside of our cockpit there is an aluminum trim piece about a foot down and under that are screws. The step into the salon also has screws. My assumption is that the removal of these would allow the "tub" to come out in one piece exposing the gas and water tanks. If later models don't have this or it does not come out I could only imagine cutting would be needed.

Great boat!

As far as removing the bridge. Blaspheme! Best place on the whole boat.

Mike

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Jerry
Jerry

October 9th, 2010, 7:18 am #8

I'm in the early stages of "considering" a particular 35 Sport Cruiser that "may be" available. I'm a bit rusty on deciphering the hull #, as it has been a while since I've actually "owned" a commander! The # is:
FDA 3520 17 H. I know it's a Holland boat, but after that, I'm lost. I anyone can help, I would truly appreciate it...

Also... The fuel tanks are bad. Can they be replaced through the lazarette in this model, or do they have to go forward??



Now, for my "Big Plans"...

I would like to de-bridge this boat and take out the sliding glass doors and have a big honkin day boat. With no bridge, do you think I would have to add support for the top, like an upright pole on either sie?

Any and all input, even from the Lendzion Boys, is greatl appreciated!!

John Kloka
"Klokanuts"
Paul, John and All:
I would hate to see you cut up any fiberglass to get the tanks out. Just cut the tanks up with a saws all, the metal is not that thick. Yes I know about the gas fumes. Certainly You would fill the tanks with water and ammonia, and a detergent like Palmalive first and slosh or let it slosh all around then pump out before cutting. This would get rid of the gas residue in the tanks. Sparks are the problem but ventilate the area well, lay duct tape down and cut through it. You may find some bronze saw's all blades or hacksaw blades for this.

If the tanks have holes in them, then more than likely the gas fumes have already evaporated. You can also hook up a vacume pump and pump out the fumes. I had a beautiful aluminum gas tank once that I wanted to put another fitting on. I hooked it up to a vacume pump and it pumped everything out and did such a good job that the tank collasped like a coke can under your foot, right before our eyes! That was pretty cool! Ventilation is the key thing here. Of course, I am more of a risk taker than most, but still alive.
Jerry FILO
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Eric Jensen
Eric Jensen

October 9th, 2010, 12:30 pm #9

I used to have some friends who welded on old gas tanks and they would drop a couple of pierced CO2 canisters into them first. While I watched from a safe distnce.
Eric
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Paul
Paul

October 9th, 2010, 4:47 pm #10

Paul, John and All:
I would hate to see you cut up any fiberglass to get the tanks out. Just cut the tanks up with a saws all, the metal is not that thick. Yes I know about the gas fumes. Certainly You would fill the tanks with water and ammonia, and a detergent like Palmalive first and slosh or let it slosh all around then pump out before cutting. This would get rid of the gas residue in the tanks. Sparks are the problem but ventilate the area well, lay duct tape down and cut through it. You may find some bronze saw's all blades or hacksaw blades for this.

If the tanks have holes in them, then more than likely the gas fumes have already evaporated. You can also hook up a vacume pump and pump out the fumes. I had a beautiful aluminum gas tank once that I wanted to put another fitting on. I hooked it up to a vacume pump and it pumped everything out and did such a good job that the tank collasped like a coke can under your foot, right before our eyes! That was pretty cool! Ventilation is the key thing here. Of course, I am more of a risk taker than most, but still alive.
Jerry FILO
There is a big danger and of course Eric's notion about pumping C02 into the tank would most likely eliminate the problem of explosion from residual fumes. It seems like the old tanks should be removed intact, because new tanks will have to go back in. Of course new tanks could be smaller. From some of the projects like Dave Varnadore's MISS LILLY, engines were removed and the tanks were brought forward and then out.

regards,

Paul
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