Stress as a CNA

Stress as a CNA

Joined: February 2nd, 2006, 1:59 pm

October 20th, 2007, 6:23 pm #1

My Ltc is getting ready to have a mandatory inservice on stress in the workplace, and I want some good input!! If your question or concern is addressed, I will let you know what my workplace had to say about it!! I am soooooo (yawning right now) tired of outsourced help to come in and do inservices about what we already know, this job is rewarding, but it does have its downfalls, especially if you really love taking care of people. My place is the Ohio Masonic Home in Springfield, Ohio. We had this inservice last year, and it wuz a JOKE!!!!!! Give me some good questions to make people think. I am a proud CNA, but too shy to start World War 3!! Here are a few things I would like to say at the meeting, but never do---

1. How do I tell a co-worker that I am doing 75% of the work, while he/she is doing 25%, especially if they are really caring to the residents, but soooooo slow?

2. When I see A supervisor sticking up for certain employees, and not others, how am I supposed
to take that? Work harder, or kiss up?

3. If it is my word against another, or two, how am I going to prove I am right?

4. Scheduling is unfair - a certain few were forced to work every weekend or quit,
while others enjoy every other weekend off, to keep their same schedules.

5. I work 11p-7a, how can I provide peri care, oral care, grooming, dressing, toileting;
all components of A.M. care, (everything we do in the morning), when I have 12 residents?

1. Hello and wake up - 1 minute
2. Toilet - 5 minutes
3. Wash face, hands, back, underarms,and peri area -5 minutes
4. Oral care - 3 minutes
5. Dressing and transfers - 3 minutes
6. Overall room check, all linens removed,call light in place, or move resident to certain
area - 3 minutes

20 minutes = good, if not quality resident care
20 minutes x 12 residents = 240 minutes, or 4 hours

Option A - I start getting people out of bed at 3AM and doing cares
Option B - I start getting people out of bed at 5AM and give half the care
that is required.


3 Wash face, hands, underarms, back, peri area - 5 minutes
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Joined: February 5th, 2004, 12:21 pm

October 22nd, 2007, 11:48 am #2

It seems to me these are questions that would be better brought up in a staff meeting not an inservice. I do the the education for the CNAs at our hospital and I have problems when people bring up stuff like this. Not that they are not good question and that they don't make our jobs more stressfull. It's just that an inservice is for education, not specific work place problems. I think you would do better to voice them at a staff meeting
Mary
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Joined: February 13th, 2004, 5:08 pm

October 22nd, 2007, 2:09 pm #3

I agree with comment that this is NOT an inservice. If everyone is truly applying the term properly, an inservice should be a learning experience. Whether or not you are being taught something you don't know already can vary. But, in my experience, management views inservice meetings as learning experiences and doesn not want them to 'degenerate' into gripe sessions.

But if you want to discuss specific job concerns, then yes, a separate team meeting (or 'bitch session') is needed.
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Joined: February 5th, 2004, 12:21 pm

October 22nd, 2007, 3:17 pm #4

Thanks Rance I am not management I am a CNA. I find it very hard to teach something and make it interesting when all people want to do is complain about their floors. Which there is nothing I can do about. I would help them if I could but when it comes down to it it's up to them and their managers.
Mary
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Joined: February 2nd, 2006, 1:59 pm

October 25th, 2007, 5:37 am #5

It seems to me these are questions that would be better brought up in a staff meeting not an inservice. I do the the education for the CNAs at our hospital and I have problems when people bring up stuff like this. Not that they are not good question and that they don't make our jobs more stressfull. It's just that an inservice is for education, not specific work place problems. I think you would do better to voice them at a staff meeting
Mary
We have no staff meetings here, only required inservice meetings that count towards inservice credits. How many staff meetings does anybody have? And how often? Who attends? Sounds like a good opportunity for voices to be heard, only if the right people were attending! How would I set up a meeting like this?
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Joined: September 4th, 2007, 12:39 pm

October 25th, 2007, 1:52 pm #6

Sounds like my experience in LTC, no staff meetings. The nurse manager would just walk the halls and have a bitch session with whoever didn't have the good sense to scatter. med-surg was different. 12 hour shifts. 730a staff meetings for nocs, 730p staff meetings for days. If you were a tech, you could attend either one.

peace always,

xtech64
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Joined: November 30th, 2007, 4:49 pm

December 7th, 2007, 4:11 am #7

My Ltc is getting ready to have a mandatory inservice on stress in the workplace, and I want some good input!! If your question or concern is addressed, I will let you know what my workplace had to say about it!! I am soooooo (yawning right now) tired of outsourced help to come in and do inservices about what we already know, this job is rewarding, but it does have its downfalls, especially if you really love taking care of people. My place is the Ohio Masonic Home in Springfield, Ohio. We had this inservice last year, and it wuz a JOKE!!!!!! Give me some good questions to make people think. I am a proud CNA, but too shy to start World War 3!! Here are a few things I would like to say at the meeting, but never do---

1. How do I tell a co-worker that I am doing 75% of the work, while he/she is doing 25%, especially if they are really caring to the residents, but soooooo slow?

2. When I see A supervisor sticking up for certain employees, and not others, how am I supposed
to take that? Work harder, or kiss up?

3. If it is my word against another, or two, how am I going to prove I am right?

4. Scheduling is unfair - a certain few were forced to work every weekend or quit,
while others enjoy every other weekend off, to keep their same schedules.

5. I work 11p-7a, how can I provide peri care, oral care, grooming, dressing, toileting;
all components of A.M. care, (everything we do in the morning), when I have 12 residents?

1. Hello and wake up - 1 minute
2. Toilet - 5 minutes
3. Wash face, hands, back, underarms,and peri area -5 minutes
4. Oral care - 3 minutes
5. Dressing and transfers - 3 minutes
6. Overall room check, all linens removed,call light in place, or move resident to certain
area - 3 minutes

20 minutes = good, if not quality resident care
20 minutes x 12 residents = 240 minutes, or 4 hours

Option A - I start getting people out of bed at 3AM and doing cares
Option B - I start getting people out of bed at 5AM and give half the care
that is required.


3 Wash face, hands, underarms, back, peri area - 5 minutes
holy bananas u just described my life at work!!! we used to have todo that to, get up 10 -12 ppl by 7 am, same as you, yet we were not allowed to start until 530 am!! Hello!!!! how do u do that? 2 aides to get 6 each, and answer bells and toilet people and get back at it and finish books and take out nite laundry and garbage??!!! we solved that quite simply- we either started at 130 am our cares and then someone complained we were starting early, and we got 'talked to ' about that, so an anonymous call went into the ministry of health and long term care and it was reported what was going on, and the reason etc. suddenly it all stopped, shift hours changed to 10-6 am and we dont get ppl up and 6 am to 2pm staff come in and start getting them up intime for breakfast. We never minded it when we originally had 4-6 ppl to get up by 630 am, but every few months the day staff would whine and say we could do a 'few more' for them and it went up and up and up. now they can do them all. we only do am care on the wanderers, like 1 or 2, if they're up.
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