how to work with a less competent CNA?

how to work with a less competent CNA?

Alpha
Alpha

October 14th, 2011, 8:06 pm #1

I work PRN at a healthcare facility. They recently hired a new CNA, full time. She is a nice person, but has no experience as a CNA. She's been working there for a month now and still not up to speed. The problem is, I cannot work with her as my hall partner. I like her, she is a nice person! But the issue is liability if she can't do something correctly. Other CNAs have told me they can't work with her, either. She is very, very slow. She waits to be told what to do, instead of just doing it. She walks into the patient's room with me and just stands there with her arms folded across her chest. I tell her "look, we have to do this together. You cannot just stand there". Also she doesn't know what a Hoyer lift is. She acts hesitant to touch or handle the patients. There are 30 people on the hall and I cannot do it all myself!! I need a reliable partner.

One evening they put me on a hall with her and I literally broke out into a cold sweat, because I was so nervous and worried something bad would happen. I told the scheduler I couldn't work with her anymore. Today they called me to work and told me to work with her on a hall and I had to refuse the request. I told them, honestly, that I felt this person was working too slowly. They are mad because I refused the request to come in, but I am worried about losing my CNA license, if I work with an incompetent person and something bad happens as a result.

She is the only person at this facility that I cannot work with. Would it be better to risk getting fired at this job, rather than losing my CNA certification due to a mishap if I work with someone who is incompetent?
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Joined: February 2nd, 2006, 1:59 pm

October 15th, 2011, 2:53 pm #2

This is a hard situation, and it is so hard on more capable workers!! AGGHH! I have the same thing at my workplace. We make her a seperate assignment ,knowing the easy residents she can do, and we pick up the slack!! No, it is not fair to work harder when you have that person, but our management has not re-assigned her or fired her so we are thankful for an extra body, and find the best place for her.
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Alpha
Alpha

October 15th, 2011, 8:44 pm #3

I don't mind working harder, but I'm worried she will make a mistake that will result in an injury to a patient. She does not know how to use Hoyer lift, for example. There has already been a mishap because she was unfamiliar with certain things, luckily the patient was not injured at all. But we had to fill out an incident report. I feel its risky for my CNA license to work with someone like her. So if the facility wants to fire me for refusing to work on a hall with her, then fine. I could still get another job somewhere else. Its better for me to get fired, than lose my license.

This has not been easy for me, but its the decision I had to make after weighing all my options.
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Joined: July 27th, 2002, 3:23 am

October 17th, 2011, 2:36 pm #4

I work PRN at a healthcare facility. They recently hired a new CNA, full time. She is a nice person, but has no experience as a CNA. She's been working there for a month now and still not up to speed. The problem is, I cannot work with her as my hall partner. I like her, she is a nice person! But the issue is liability if she can't do something correctly. Other CNAs have told me they can't work with her, either. She is very, very slow. She waits to be told what to do, instead of just doing it. She walks into the patient's room with me and just stands there with her arms folded across her chest. I tell her "look, we have to do this together. You cannot just stand there". Also she doesn't know what a Hoyer lift is. She acts hesitant to touch or handle the patients. There are 30 people on the hall and I cannot do it all myself!! I need a reliable partner.

One evening they put me on a hall with her and I literally broke out into a cold sweat, because I was so nervous and worried something bad would happen. I told the scheduler I couldn't work with her anymore. Today they called me to work and told me to work with her on a hall and I had to refuse the request. I told them, honestly, that I felt this person was working too slowly. They are mad because I refused the request to come in, but I am worried about losing my CNA license, if I work with an incompetent person and something bad happens as a result.

She is the only person at this facility that I cannot work with. Would it be better to risk getting fired at this job, rather than losing my CNA certification due to a mishap if I work with someone who is incompetent?
is this aide trainable? sometimes these aides haven't had anyone take the time to train them inthe job, i know there are untrainables out there. they fired the last one we had, finally.
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amy
amy

October 18th, 2011, 2:49 am #5

I work PRN at a healthcare facility. They recently hired a new CNA, full time. She is a nice person, but has no experience as a CNA. She's been working there for a month now and still not up to speed. The problem is, I cannot work with her as my hall partner. I like her, she is a nice person! But the issue is liability if she can't do something correctly. Other CNAs have told me they can't work with her, either. She is very, very slow. She waits to be told what to do, instead of just doing it. She walks into the patient's room with me and just stands there with her arms folded across her chest. I tell her "look, we have to do this together. You cannot just stand there". Also she doesn't know what a Hoyer lift is. She acts hesitant to touch or handle the patients. There are 30 people on the hall and I cannot do it all myself!! I need a reliable partner.

One evening they put me on a hall with her and I literally broke out into a cold sweat, because I was so nervous and worried something bad would happen. I told the scheduler I couldn't work with her anymore. Today they called me to work and told me to work with her on a hall and I had to refuse the request. I told them, honestly, that I felt this person was working too slowly. They are mad because I refused the request to come in, but I am worried about losing my CNA license, if I work with an incompetent person and something bad happens as a result.

She is the only person at this facility that I cannot work with. Would it be better to risk getting fired at this job, rather than losing my CNA certification due to a mishap if I work with someone who is incompetent?
This makes you so mad! i have had the same problem over the past couple years with alot of new girls. The thing is if you complain than you will just end up looking like the big mean pushy cna. The best thing to do is to sit down and talk to the DNS and explain to them that you feel like she may need some training one on one again. even offer to do it on another night when she's not on a assignment so you don't double your work load. Trust me you will look like your going out of your way and it might even help speed her up. if the problem still continues than maybe they will take notice since you brought it to their attention. they will also remember your helpfull positive attitude. good luck!
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Alpha
Alpha

October 20th, 2011, 11:05 pm #6

is this aide trainable? sometimes these aides haven't had anyone take the time to train them inthe job, i know there are untrainables out there. they fired the last one we had, finally.
I just talked to someone, they are probably going to let this girl go (unfortunately). Too many other CNAs refuse to work with her. I do not want her to lose her job, but maybe there is somewhere else she can work that is slower paced. This just happens to be a very difficult facility to work in, and if someone has no experience, they may not make it.
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anonymous
anonymous

August 30th, 2012, 6:47 pm #7

I work PRN at a healthcare facility. They recently hired a new CNA, full time. She is a nice person, but has no experience as a CNA. She's been working there for a month now and still not up to speed. The problem is, I cannot work with her as my hall partner. I like her, she is a nice person! But the issue is liability if she can't do something correctly. Other CNAs have told me they can't work with her, either. She is very, very slow. She waits to be told what to do, instead of just doing it. She walks into the patient's room with me and just stands there with her arms folded across her chest. I tell her "look, we have to do this together. You cannot just stand there". Also she doesn't know what a Hoyer lift is. She acts hesitant to touch or handle the patients. There are 30 people on the hall and I cannot do it all myself!! I need a reliable partner.

One evening they put me on a hall with her and I literally broke out into a cold sweat, because I was so nervous and worried something bad would happen. I told the scheduler I couldn't work with her anymore. Today they called me to work and told me to work with her on a hall and I had to refuse the request. I told them, honestly, that I felt this person was working too slowly. They are mad because I refused the request to come in, but I am worried about losing my CNA license, if I work with an incompetent person and something bad happens as a result.

She is the only person at this facility that I cannot work with. Would it be better to risk getting fired at this job, rather than losing my CNA certification due to a mishap if I work with someone who is incompetent?
I know the feeling . I get so tired of feeling like I'm some of the cna's mother. They leave dirty briefs in the rooms, clothes all over, residents are soaked, there are no gowns washed, most of the time I would rather work by myself I feel like I do half the time anyway. What really gets me we all get chewed out for their incompetentency. Why can't some people comprehend if they do the job right it isn't that hard and it runs smoothly and who do they think they are leving the work for others and how do they get away with it? They also stick me with the unexperienced ones because I do my job right. Daily I think about changing professions.
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