becoming a cna in idaho

becoming a cna in idaho

Joined: September 19th, 2006, 3:31 am

September 19th, 2006, 4:20 am #1

i havent started school yet or anything, but i am going to job showed a cna first at different places they work. But what i would like to know is it better to be a cna in a hospital or assisted living. My next question is do cna's work in clincis (doc in the box)
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Joined: February 13th, 2004, 5:08 pm

September 19th, 2006, 9:36 am #2

What is 'better' is simply a matter of opinion and primarily rests on what you want from the job (monetarily, personally).

My first job was in a clinic. I 'roomed' people, took their vitals, confirmed their medications and wrote them, and got some basic medical history and why they were in to see the doctor. I also helped a bit with some minor procedures and supplies, etc. Job didn't really use any CNA 'skills' (except vitals). For me, it got boring. But, I basically worked 9-5, M-F. I only worked a weekend here and there, had time to take lunch. So, the job had very little stress in it. It's 'better' from a scheduling standpoint and you primarily work by yourself --- don't need to worry much about other employees showing up or not showing up.

Assisted living is a step 'up'. You'll use some of your CNA skills, but will deal with people are more physically and mentally 'able' than you might (as a generalization) in LTC or hospital. You'll be on your feet all day, running around (just like other jobs in healthcare), but will have relatively simple tasks of assisting people.

A hospital is a different world. How 'intense' that experience is depends on what area you work in. You use ALL your CNA skills, then learn another dozen or so. It would take up a couple of paragraphs to state all the potential things you do in a hospital (such as EKG's, working with labs with samples and blood, working with computerized monitoring, post-mortem care, etc.). You learn a huge amount of terminology for medical conditions and learn to set up medical equipment. If you are not intimidated by learning a great deal while not having a 'routine', that's the job for you. I found this to be the toughest job as far as rarely getting a break, or lunch, and running from patient-to-patient and situation-to-situation. But, the day flew by --- looked at the clock 2-3 times in a day. Every time you look, it's 2-3 hours later.

The large difference of hospital-to-LTC (or assisted living) is that you only deal with patients for a limited time period. They get better, and leave. In LTC, you get to know your patients and can develop a 'routine'. Many people are more confortable with that because if they know they are assigned to hall 'x', they'll have an idea (after you've been there awhile) as to what people need what kind of assistance, who you can talk to, who you can kid around with, what your priorities are, etc. In a hospital, there is no consistency --- every day is a new day with new patients and you have no idea what kind of situation you'll walk into.

What is 'better' is your call.


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Joined: September 19th, 2006, 3:31 am

October 4th, 2006, 7:19 am #3

Thank you for your response. I am going to be job shadowing cna's in different invironments just to see if i want to really be a cna or not. Then i will be starting school.
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