is the Lego Story going the way of the dino?

General chit-chat, talk about anything ya want... as long as it's clean, considerate, and respectful.

is the Lego Story going the way of the dino?

Quill Master
Ye Olde Guard
Joined: 26 Sep 2005, 12:29

03 Jul 2013, 04:27 #1

A question that I posed over at CC and wanted to cross-post here...



So it makes the next question come up... how to stay relevant? Because I'm really unsure how....

How do you write Lego stories (which I really enjoy and very much want to continue) that are relevant and will draw people interested in reading them?

Or is the whole idea dead with the format change? I think Flickr is interesting and sparks the imagination - is it enough to take out the art of Lego Stories/comics?

If not, how to make something that can reach people?


In a world of Flickr and etc, is the Lego Story going the way of the dino? :unsure:

If not, how to make a story that someone will want to read? Comics have more success than text I've found but still limited...
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The Hordesman
In FBTB Realm
Joined: 09 Oct 2005, 07:53

05 Jul 2013, 19:12 #2

But brickshelf is still alive and well, right?
Herpus es Derpus
-Family motto
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Maedhros
Ye Olde Guard
Joined: 26 Sep 2005, 17:17

06 Jul 2013, 08:54 #3

To me it seems like the following has always been quite small, with a few exceptions (Ikros). I think what it mostly comes down to is a need for more spectacular builds and pictures (and good photo editing I suppose), since good writing in itself rarely seems to draw in big crowds in the LEGOverse (I dare not say why). I do agree though that the interest seems to have grown smaller and smaller, maybe it has to do with young ones reading less and less overall?
"All disasters stem from us. Why is there war? Perhaps because now and then I might be inclined to snap at my neighbour. Because I and my neighbour and everyone else do not have enough love. Yet we could fight war and all its excrescences by releasing, each day, the love that is shackled inside us, and giving it a chance to live."

- Etty Hillesum
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AlbaVik
Instrumentalist
Joined: 10 May 2010, 17:59

06 Jul 2013, 19:24 #4

As Maedhros states, it could well be the younger generations being less accustomed to reading at all.
This, along with the increasingly complex level of building and focus on image-driven websites like FlickR is probably part of what's staunching LEGO stories. The recent years' rise of more MOC-based community projects like the LCC sure is some form of storytelling, but it's just not quite the same.
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Quill Master
Ye Olde Guard
Joined: 26 Sep 2005, 12:29

09 Jul 2013, 08:38 #5

AlbaVik @ Jul 7 2013, 03:24 AM wrote: As Maedhros states, it could well be the younger generations being less accustomed to reading at all.

I believe this is probably true.

It does make me wonder if actual comic books are also declining in sales in younger groups of people. I actually only have a few comic books so my knowledge about the industry is somewhat limited.
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TheOrk
Squire at Legoland Billund
Joined: 02 Mar 2006, 02:30

24 Oct 2013, 00:46 #6

Unfortunately, I have noticed this phenomena as well. You have all raised good points on the subject that are not incorrect. I also believe that there is a correlation with the growing illiteracy amongst today's youth. Kids today probably won't be as interested in a LEGO story told in long form as a opposed to something like a short comic or meme. Although I think there is still potentially a reasonably sized audience for LEGO stories.

Personally, I think one of the main reasons for the big decline over the last few years is due to poor execution on the part of the writers (no offence to anyone here, if we're gonna play the blame game I'm as guilty as anyone). First off, there's a critical lack of marketing to promote these stories around the internet, so most of the potential audience is left in the dark. Secondly, there hasn't been a major blockbuster epic like Ikros, since Ikros (which was over ten years ago) so many people even within the community don't realise the potential for LEGO based stories. Back in the day, I read a couple LEGO stories with vague interest but wasn't really converted until I stumbled upon Ikros. There have certainly been a few really good stories since then (many posted here) but none have or have yet to fill the the void left by Ikros.

I live adjacent to a comic book store, so I have some idea of what is going on in the industry. Its declined a lot in recent years, but it still has a core fanbase that keeps it going.
Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two equals four. If that is granted, all else follows.

-George Orwell



Avatar by Graynar
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Quill Master
Ye Olde Guard
Joined: 26 Sep 2005, 12:29

21 Dec 2013, 03:28 #7

That's a good post TheOrk - I tend to agree with all of what you said there~
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Graynar
CW Hero
Joined: 01 Oct 2005, 02:09

15 Apr 2014, 18:04 #8

I echo the above sentiments too. Kids and even adults are losing their attention spans faster and faster every day. No one has time to read lengthy stories with lots of those troublesome words anymore. People want fast, poor quality memes and big fancy pictures. Today's generation craves everything instantly, if it takes more than a minute to read they're gone.

Nowadays people can barely watch a youtube video of 3 minutes in length without wanting to switch to a shorter one. What can Lego story writers do to keep up with the fast changing needs of today's generation?

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Quill Master
Ye Olde Guard
Joined: 26 Sep 2005, 12:29

20 Feb 2016, 08:19 #9

Graynar @ Apr 16 2014, 02:04 AM wrote: Nowadays people can barely watch a youtube video of 3 minutes in length without wanting to switch to a shorter one.

This is so true :orcgrin: :orcgrin:
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