Hello to the Chainsaw Artist Community

Hello to the Chainsaw Artist Community

Joined: April 6th, 2018, 9:28 pm

April 6th, 2018, 10:26 pm #1

Hello ;
I am a new member of the Community and would like to thank you in advance for your valuable replies and my acceptances.My name is Ayberk i am from Istanbul currently based in Montenegro.I am a multi-media sculptor preparing for two exhibitions from two different disciplines which are life size figures worked in composites and some dadaist sculptures worked from various recycled or found materials like wood , metal and stone.As i am a newcomer i have some questions and need help in some ways.First of all i am type of nomad i ran away from my own country where i was earning my life as a commercial Balloon pilot and a tourist guide and moved to Montenegro because of religious extremism rising so i am a type of nomad.I dont own a studio or any facility i make my sculptures in the salloon of my flat and sometimes in the garden if the weather permits.I thought about chainsaw carving some small sculptures and selling them on the roadside for between 15€ / 30 € to help me complete my main projects and help me to eat and drink.With this motivation i collect some money and bought a stihl ms 170 with standard setup.I haven't bought the safety equipment yet so now the saw looks at me and i look at it as i dont want to use it without ppe.i have a bosch ggs 8c variable speed die grinder which my girlfriend gifted me before i stepped into this adventure and use this tool nearly in all stages of my sculptures.i have a small car which i think will be enough to carry some small logs to carve and the saw.My question to the initiated people is what should i do with the saw what type of manouvers or cuts should i have to practice before attempting to shape a log with this standart setup ? Can i sculpt a relatively simple item with this setup without changing the clutch drum , chain and bar ? If not which system shall i switch to ? I cant buy two saws.i only have a ms 170 a die grinder a small car which is not totaly mine and a backpack.i am sorry to keep it unnecessarily long and thanks in advance..
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dennis
dennis

April 7th, 2018, 9:24 am #2

Hi Ayberk, love your enthusiasm you can carve a lot of things with your set up, mushrooms are easy, carve them upside down stalk first the flip it over and shape the cap, its not a powerful saw so i advise not to carve any bigger diameter than the bar length, you can carve silhouette of any bird or animal and as your skill develops add detail, plunge cuts are the most dangerous to master look for instruction youtube, cutting with the tip causes kickback always start the cut with the back of the saw angled down, keeping a sharp chain is most important if the bark is dirty take it off, if you know any one who uses a chainsaw ask to spend some time with them picking up tips, a saw is an unforgiving tool if you misuse it,

good luck dddennis
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buzzsaw
buzzsaw

April 7th, 2018, 1:33 pm #3

Hello ;
I am a new member of the Community and would like to thank you in advance for your valuable replies and my acceptances.My name is Ayberk i am from Istanbul currently based in Montenegro.I am a multi-media sculptor preparing for two exhibitions from two different disciplines which are life size figures worked in composites and some dadaist sculptures worked from various recycled or found materials like wood , metal and stone.As i am a newcomer i have some questions and need help in some ways.First of all i am type of nomad i ran away from my own country where i was earning my life as a commercial Balloon pilot and a tourist guide and moved to Montenegro because of religious extremism rising so i am a type of nomad.I dont own a studio or any facility i make my sculptures in the salloon of my flat and sometimes in the garden if the weather permits.I thought about chainsaw carving some small sculptures and selling them on the roadside for between 15€ / 30 € to help me complete my main projects and help me to eat and drink.With this motivation i collect some money and bought a stihl ms 170 with standard setup.I haven't bought the safety equipment yet so now the saw looks at me and i look at it as i dont want to use it without ppe.i have a bosch ggs 8c variable speed die grinder which my girlfriend gifted me before i stepped into this adventure and use this tool nearly in all stages of my sculptures.i have a small car which i think will be enough to carry some small logs to carve and the saw.My question to the initiated people is what should i do with the saw what type of manouvers or cuts should i have to practice before attempting to shape a log with this standart setup ? Can i sculpt a relatively simple item with this setup without changing the clutch drum , chain and bar ? If not which system shall i switch to ? I cant buy two saws.i only have a ms 170 a die grinder a small car which is not totaly mine and a backpack.i am sorry to keep it unnecessarily long and thanks in advance..
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R.B.
R.B.

April 8th, 2018, 12:11 am #4

Hello ;
I am a new member of the Community and would like to thank you in advance for your valuable replies and my acceptances.My name is Ayberk i am from Istanbul currently based in Montenegro.I am a multi-media sculptor preparing for two exhibitions from two different disciplines which are life size figures worked in composites and some dadaist sculptures worked from various recycled or found materials like wood , metal and stone.As i am a newcomer i have some questions and need help in some ways.First of all i am type of nomad i ran away from my own country where i was earning my life as a commercial Balloon pilot and a tourist guide and moved to Montenegro because of religious extremism rising so i am a type of nomad.I dont own a studio or any facility i make my sculptures in the salloon of my flat and sometimes in the garden if the weather permits.I thought about chainsaw carving some small sculptures and selling them on the roadside for between 15€ / 30 € to help me complete my main projects and help me to eat and drink.With this motivation i collect some money and bought a stihl ms 170 with standard setup.I haven't bought the safety equipment yet so now the saw looks at me and i look at it as i dont want to use it without ppe.i have a bosch ggs 8c variable speed die grinder which my girlfriend gifted me before i stepped into this adventure and use this tool nearly in all stages of my sculptures.i have a small car which i think will be enough to carry some small logs to carve and the saw.My question to the initiated people is what should i do with the saw what type of manouvers or cuts should i have to practice before attempting to shape a log with this standart setup ? Can i sculpt a relatively simple item with this setup without changing the clutch drum , chain and bar ? If not which system shall i switch to ? I cant buy two saws.i only have a ms 170 a die grinder a small car which is not totaly mine and a backpack.i am sorry to keep it unnecessarily long and thanks in advance..
Safety glasses and respect for the tool is all you need.
The die grinder will be the first thing that bites you.
Might be wise to stay away from a 20 inch bar for awhile,
That's the one that has jumped at my nose the most...lol
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Joined: May 12th, 2016, 7:49 pm

April 9th, 2018, 3:21 pm #5

I have carved a lot of pieces with just that 170. Mushroom are a great starter piece and you can carve all types of mushroom.

The other tools you might want to consider is a angle grinder, electric drill (because the are usually cheap) and a propane torch. This will help you color and clean up pieces to look better. I don't know what your cost is over there but here in the US I can get a electric drill and a couple nylon brushes for under 40.00 us.

With just a chainsaw, torch and drill with a brush you can make some pretty awesome pieces with some practice.
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Joined: May 12th, 2016, 7:49 pm

April 9th, 2018, 3:31 pm #6

The sooner you can afford a dime tip bar, 1/4 inch sprocket and couple chains the quicker you can get into fine detail. The dime tip is a much safer bar to use. There is really no kickback. When it comes to cuts with this saw...... You will just have to go after it and develop a style. I don't know what else to say there. Everything good comes with practice and time.
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Joined: April 13th, 2018, 2:22 am

April 13th, 2018, 2:53 am #7

Hi Ayberk, love your enthusiasm you can carve a lot of things with your set up, mushrooms are easy, carve them upside down stalk first the flip it over and shape the cap, its not a powerful saw so i advise not to carve any bigger diameter than the bar length, you can carve silhouette of any bird or animal and as your skill develops add detail, plunge cuts are the most dangerous to master look for instruction youtube, cutting with the tip causes kickback always start the cut with the back of the saw angled down, keeping a sharp chain is most important if the bark is dirty take it off, if you know any one who uses a chainsaw ask to spend some time with them picking up tips, a saw is an unforgiving tool if you misuse it,

good luck dddennis
Sorry for being late to say thank you Dennis as something happened with my account and i need to register a new one.So far i found some time to be alone with the saw and just like every other tool i use i tried to measure its reactions and behaviors with manipulating the throttle and various parts of the bar on a piece of big scrap firewood.Saw is small but i am surprised how easily it can shape the meterial in hand.I havent used it at full throttle or did some actual cutting as my ppe hasn't arrived yet.Although there are some people on this mountain village with saws language is a big problem and i cant seem to find a way around with them.I am reading about the chainsaw and its procedures from forestry and logging forums mostly to get a better understanding.As i was away from two stroke dirt bikes for many years that smell put a big smile on my face which quickly returned to normal as the chain started to spin.After my protection arrives i will try to do some basic shaping on small diameter logs as you mentioned.Thank you again and have a beautiful day please.
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Joined: May 8th, 2018, 9:44 am

May 8th, 2018, 9:57 am #8

Top o the morning
I just stumbled upon this and had to sign up while searching for better trick dealing with 3-4’ diameter questions on debarking. So I’m new in here also - good to kind of meet you all. About the post above - don’t worry about what you don’t have as much as enjoying what you do - if you have a saw and grinder your in business - I’d say learn to make your own chisels for old tool steel and mallets . I finish more with chisels now - faster and cleaner in the end and than die grinders/ I still use grinders. But we can’t over look the simple tools - axe hatchet chisels . Trade favors for log delivery / removal - hopefully you have enough room - before ya know it you’ll have too many logs in your yard. Keep on carvin ‘ !!! Good day
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Joined: April 13th, 2018, 2:22 am

May 11th, 2018, 2:21 pm #9

CarveAfishMiles wrote:Top o the morning
I just stumbled upon this and had to sign up while searching for better trick dealing with 3-4’ diameter questions on debarking. So I’m new in here also - good to kind of meet you all. About the post above - don’t worry about what you don’t have as much as enjoying what you do - if you have a saw and grinder your in business - I’d say learn to make your own chisels for old tool steel and mallets . I finish more with chisels now - faster and cleaner in the end and than die grinders/ I still use grinders. But we can’t over look the simple tools - axe hatchet chisels . Trade favors for log delivery / removal - hopefully you have enough room - before ya know it you’ll have too many logs in your yard. Keep on carvin ‘ !!! Good day
Thank you for your advices about crafting basic steel tools.I will give them a try for sure.I preferto be minimalist in my tools as i suffered a lot from complicated projects designed for special equipment and tooling so for now i only use standard equipment and work my way around instead.But i will possibly own a heavy duty sculpting chisel and put it aside my chainsaw.I gathered a few logs for now to carve and for debarking i use a machete and sometimes a small hatchet..Thank you again for your texts and have a beutiful day..



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Joined: May 11th, 2018, 11:44 am

May 11th, 2018, 3:59 pm #10


Hello Ayberk you have an interesting story there! I can only ad one little bit of advice to the others, the two basic parts of this are saw skills and imagination, the skill part only comes with practice. Even if you just use a saw to block something out it still saves allot of time eh? Then as your skills improve you'll slide right into the next level. The carving events (happening all over the world now) are one of the best learning experiences but i'm not sure about in your area. Best of luck! -Joe


Ps. there are different ways to hold down a smaller piece of wood, i normally screw thru a flat board into the bottom of what i want to work on, then screw the board into a larger 'carving stump'. Something like this:
carvblok.jpg
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Joined: April 13th, 2018, 2:22 am

May 11th, 2018, 4:50 pm #11

Highlander thanks a lot for the clear diagram i will try it as soon as possible as i am spending most of my time trying to secure the log instead of carving and i can not cut clean because of this.Yes my life became interesting surely every bloody day turns out as a new adventure i dont know really where it will lead i will live to see hopefully..Thank you again for your attention and diagram ..have a nice day please.
Highlander wrote:

Hello Ayberk you have an interesting story there! I can only ad one little bit of advice to the others, the two basic parts of this are saw skills and imagination, the skill part only comes with practice. Even if you just use a saw to block something out it still saves allot of time eh? Then as your skills improve you'll slide right into the next level. The carving events (happening all over the world now) are one of the best learning experiences but i'm not sure about in your area. Best of luck! -Joe


Ps. there are different ways to hold down a smaller piece of wood, i normally screw thru a flat board into the bottom of what i want to work on, then screw the board into a larger 'carving stump'. Something like this:
carvblok.jpg
Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk

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