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Joined: April 1st, 2011, 11:07 pm

August 23rd, 2016, 11:55 pm #161

My Mom received a ton of money for her 92nd birthday which was yesterday.

I gave her a paperback.

I love to coax my Mom to tell me the story of her trip with her Uncle and his family to Deer Island Maine in 1934. Single car ferry, beautiful inn, rowing a boat with her cousin in failed circles and of course going to the movies at the Stonington Opera House and knowing that her stern uncle was toughening her character to see Boris Karloff play a monster in "Frankenstein" (1931). My mom lost her mom when she was three .... but .... her uncle and guardian ... the one that brought her to see Frankenstein ..... was a surgeon.

Interesting contrast.

Yet a reprieve from the projectionist - the projector broke. No need to watch various body parts surgically connected or bolted together.

Oh, that's right, the name of the paperback was Linda Greenlaw's "The Lobster Chronicles" which is about her life as a lobstermAn on teeny tiny Monhegan Island Maine.

With book in hand I opened it and read a random page to my Mom. It is where Linda talks about storing her Lobster boat for the winter in none other than Stonington, Deer Island Maine!

Then out of the blue my Mom said she wants to write a book. I said sure. She worked as the right hand mAn for a major publisher's production control for almost twenty years.
Last edited by Leland33 on August 24th, 2016, 11:16 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: February 19th, 2010, 9:12 pm

August 24th, 2016, 6:48 pm #162

Leland...you gave your mom the perfect gift!  Encourage her to tell her stories...record them if she can't write them. 

My next book will be New England Bound by Wendy Warren.  It is about slavery and colonization in early America and has gotten good reviews.
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Joined: February 7th, 2008, 5:54 pm

August 24th, 2016, 7:25 pm #163

I know we all have read it.

Stiil a good Summer re-visit.

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Joined: April 1st, 2011, 11:07 pm

August 25th, 2016, 3:05 am #164

Whoops not me DM. I will read it someday.

But the movie should be a controlled substance.

After seeing the flick I wanted to check into a rehab.
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Joined: October 8th, 2007, 8:25 pm

August 25th, 2016, 9:00 am #165

I believe that every American should read this incredible and powerful book:

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Joined: February 19th, 2010, 9:12 pm

October 6th, 2016, 7:31 pm #166

I'm in the middle of New England Bound by Wendy Warren which is about the history of slavery and colonization in not only New England but down the coast and the West Indies as well.  It is a slow read because it is packed with information.  I find that I need to read it with my laptop or tablet close by because I keep wanting to look up people, places on maps and terms.  It has already changed my understanding of slavery in New England (which included Native American and West Indian native slaves.)

For something lighter (I am hoping!) I ordered DM's suggestion of The Naked Lunch, which I haven't read before.


I am planning to order Kevin Baker's newest book, America the Ingenious.   For the few of you in New York City area, you can get the book and a walking tour with Kevin on October 9.  Wish I were there for it!


https://www.powerhousearena.com/shop/ti ... lking-tour
Last edited by Karly on October 6th, 2016, 8:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 27th, 2011, 4:12 pm

October 6th, 2016, 8:16 pm #167

Karly wrote:
For something lighter (I am hoping!) I ordered DM's suggestion of The Naked Lunch, which I haven't read before.
Good luck. I thought the book would be right down my alley but I had no freakin' idea what the hell was going on half the time.
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Joined: April 1st, 2011, 11:07 pm

October 6th, 2016, 9:10 pm #168

I just fired my NYC bruh Kevin's invite. What a book he has compile!!! - my kind of book ...[shyly he askes] how many pictures/photographs?

Just received Ingmar's book "The Magic Lantern" 300 pages at least 40 photos. English first Ed., first printing. In a way I was hoping io ordered the Swedish edition because then it would still sit on the shelf for a reason but I'd still look at the pix. The ones I wanted to see didn't need translation.

Idk about the naked lunch...to add to my comment posted above; I saw TNL at the art cinema in Newburyport. Put it this way, IF I went back to THAT cinema I'd fear a vintage typewriter chasing me around the theater gnawing at my ankles. And get this - the audience wouldn't care.

In TNL the dynamic typewriter is introduced early so it's not a spoiler. Some scenes were a wide shot of the guy's study and nothing happens to the typewriter for a long time ... and well others scenes ...........

All the bragging I've done of being a deCrasto descendant - they owned slaves at their South American sugar plantation. But happy ones.
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Joined: September 17th, 2005, 12:19 am

October 8th, 2016, 4:53 am #169

Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.    Probably the best book I've ever read on the foundations of the civil structure of the US Government.   The mudslinging endured by the Founding fathers was worse than anything seen today.   Hamilton and Jefferson could barely tolerate each others presence and used anonymous letters to their own "newspapers" to disparage each other unmercifully.   It would have been great to see them on Cape Ann Online.   Hamilton often wrote 40,000 word essays in the course of a week to defend his positions.   He had his personal life problems....being subjected to the blackmailing husband of a floozie that Hamilton had fallen for.   It took him years to find out the floozie was using him to get money from the blackmailing husband.   But in those days, once Hamiltons' bitterest political enemies found out some of his behavior was only because of being blackmailed and not to undermine any common interests in the fledgling US democracy, they backed off the embarrassing affair and deemed the punishment of the blackmailing  husband not worth the public expense.
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Joined: February 19th, 2010, 9:12 pm

October 18th, 2016, 6:54 pm #170

UJ...that book goes on my list!  I can't wait to be retired so I can read half the day.

Right now...finished Wendy Warren's book which was incredibly eye-opening.  I stopped by Cape Ann Museum at lunch today and they are trying to get her to come and give a talk there.


So now I am planning to read Naked Lunch and Kevin Baker's latest book that I mentioned previously.  


In the Cape Ann Museum gift shop I saw a book I think I would like.  It is...


The Mortal Sea
Fishing in the Atlantic in the Age of Sail
By W. Jeffrey Bolster


I flipped through it a bit.  Has anyone read it?

[font=GRAPHIK, 'HELVETICA NEUE', HELVETICA, ARIAL, SANS-SERIF][/font]
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Joined: June 3rd, 2006, 8:10 pm

October 18th, 2016, 7:33 pm #171

Twelve Thousand Years - American Indians in Maine

Makes me feel very small, yet reverent for some of their ways of life. The book is a treasured keepsake.

Maine History Online - To 1500 People of the Dawn

A bit more accessible.
Last edited by brainfix on October 18th, 2016, 7:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof." - Christopher Hitchens
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Joined: February 19th, 2010, 9:12 pm

October 18th, 2016, 7:42 pm #172

brain...I think I would like that.  I am trying to learn more about the history of American Indians in New England.  There was a lot of information on that topic in  Wendy Warren's book...I never realized how badly they were treated here or that their homes were burned and they were sent to the West Indies to be plantation slaves.

You might like The Eastern, another book set in Maine...historical fiction by Deb Gould.  I can't wait for her next book.
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Joined: June 3rd, 2006, 8:10 pm

October 18th, 2016, 7:49 pm #173

Karly, it's so refreshing to know someone who has such an advanced outlook on many topics. Your take on 12,000 years sounds like you're partly there yourself.
"What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof." - Christopher Hitchens
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Joined: June 3rd, 2006, 8:10 pm

October 18th, 2016, 8:28 pm #174

That is a lengthy timeline that begs all kinds of questions. We're all agreed that Cristoforo Colombo didn't discover the New World, right? So who did, the Norse?
"What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof." - Christopher Hitchens
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Joined: April 27th, 2011, 4:12 pm

November 4th, 2016, 10:47 pm #175

Heart of Dankness: Underground Botanists, Outlaw Farmers and the Race for the Cannabis Cup
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Joined: February 19th, 2010, 9:12 pm

November 20th, 2016, 6:02 pm #176

"Good luck. I thought the book would be right down my alley but I had no freakin' idea what the hell was going on half the time. "

  ~ gator, regarding Naked Lunch


I'm not sure anything could have prepared me for that book.  I read about half and decided that I needed to put it down and study the author, his cohorts and what they had to say about him.  I was especially curious about his sanity, addiction, and whether he was a misogynist or more of a misanthrope.   I also needed a break because I am rather squeamish and the descriptions were at times difficult for me.  I was fascinated enough with his complete disregard for societal convention, his use of insect-type creatures doing awful things (which kind of makes it easier to disengage from or even develop feelings about his characters), and the raw possession of the soul that you could see through his descriptions of addiction... but I had the feeling that I wasn't getting as much out of it as I could.  I've read other authors who have one part of this or another...one of my favorite authors Gabriel Garcia Marquez has such beautiful surrealism in his books but Naked Lunch felt like more of an assault.  So I'm finishing the rest looking at it with a different expectation of it...trying to have no expectation but with more background on what is being done and why. And with some appreciation for its part in the history of censorship of literature.


I've also started The Mortal Sea which won't be a fast read but I will learn a lot from it...500 years of history of the Atlantic and fishing.
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Joined: September 17th, 2005, 12:19 am

November 21st, 2016, 1:35 am #177

Karly wrote:
UJ...that book goes on my list!  I can't wait to be retired so I can read half the day.

Right now...finished Wendy Warren's book which was incredibly eye-opening.  I stopped by Cape Ann Museum at lunch today and they are trying to get her to come and give a talk there.


So now I am planning to read Naked Lunch and Kevin Baker's latest book that I mentioned previously.  


In the Cape Ann Museum gift shop I saw a book I think I would like.  It is...


The Mortal Sea
Fishing in the Atlantic in the Age of Sail
By W. Jeffrey Bolster


I flipped through it a bit.  Has anyone read it?

[font=GRAPHIK, 'HELVETICA NEUE', HELVETICA, ARIAL, SANS-SERIF][/font]
It really is superb, Karly.   I dog eared many of the pages and am going back with a highlighter to underline the passages I found most illuminating.   Haven't done that since my college days of five decades ago.    What I found so interesting was that Hamilton and Jefferson,  were  so fundamentally in agreement in 1787 and then became bitter rivals during the first administration of Washington.   Madison, who co-wrote the Federalist Papers along with Hamilton and Jay, became an even worse enemy later.    The fundamental differences after the Constitution was adopted (which was a huge battle unto itself)....was how to preserve it.   Jefferson thought a free nation could only be maintained by a nation of independent farmers...an agricultural based nation.    Hamilton thought you had to have a powerful industrial base in order to defend against foreign intervention.     As I mentioned, there were personal traits of all the founding fathers that had an influence on how others perceived them.
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Joined: February 19th, 2010, 9:12 pm

April 1st, 2017, 5:57 pm #178

I've been reading a lot of non-fiction.


The Mortal Sea - Fishing in the Atlantic in the Age of Sail was Jeffrey Bolster's dissertation turned book.  I am really glad I read it but don't recommend it to anyone looking for light reading. I learned quite a lot about how the precautionary approach to preserving fish of all kinds was turned down again and again over hundreds of years.

The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson - non-fiction that reads like a novel.  Really well done.  About architecture in America,  society in Chicago and a serial killer in the late 1800's at the Chicago world's fair.  By the way...you can see some of Gloucester's exhibit from that fair at the Cape Ann Museum.


The Orchard by Adele Crockett Robertson - about beloved selectwoman Kitty Robertson of Ipswich...in her own words.  I loved this book like I loved My Antonia by Willa Cather.  Need I say more?


Currently reading... The White Blackbird...A Life of the Painter Margarett Sargent by her granddaughter Honor Moore.  I'm just 50 pages in but already hooked.


For May and June..Mandela: A Celebration of Life by Charlene Smith.  Charlene was the South African reporter who he asked for when he was first released from prison.  She is a friend and I am long overdue to read this book...she has written over 20 books.  Also..Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow as recommended by UJ.   


Too many books...too little time.  Must retire!
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Joined: September 1st, 2012, 8:06 am

April 1st, 2017, 6:05 pm #179

I recently finished the second (and am in the middle of the third) books of Peter Hook's musical/biographical trilogy. Funny, truthful, sad, inspiring, nostalgic. Probably for a limited audience...but if you think you might like them - you will.

1. The Hacienda: How Not To Run A Club
2. Unknown Pleasures: Inside Joy Division
3. Substance: Inside New Order.
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Joined: April 27th, 2011, 4:12 pm

April 1st, 2017, 6:51 pm #180

Unbound: A True Story of War, Love, and Survival by Dean King

"In October 1934, the Chinese Communist Army found itself facing annihilation, surrounded by hundreds of thousands of Nationalist soldiers. Rather than surrender, 86,000 Communists embarked on an epic flight to safety. Only thirty were women. Their trek would eventually cover 4,000 miles over 370 days. Under enemy fire they crossed highland swamps, climbed Tibetan peaks, scrambled over chain bridges, and trudged through the sands of the western deserts. Fewer than 10,000 of them would survive, but remarkably all of the women would live to tell the tale."
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