Any reenactors out there???

Any reenactors out there???

Joined: May 10th, 2003, 2:25 am

October 18th, 2011, 5:27 pm #1

I'm reading a neat article in the May 2011 edition of MuzzleBlasts about 18th century trekking, and they are talking about groups that do historic period trekking.

Some the areas they are describing, I've BEEN to........Way cool.

Here is the article::

http://www.nmlra.org/pdfs/web_Article-M ... ekking.pdf

Here is a link to their website:

http://www.nmlra.org/publication.asp

Later,

Geo
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Joined: April 22nd, 2003, 1:37 am

October 18th, 2011, 6:28 pm #2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMqSmiC_ ... r_embedded#!

Never get tired of this one. I love history!

....enjoy every sandwich.
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Joined: May 16th, 2003, 12:40 am

October 18th, 2011, 7:53 pm #3

I'd forgotten this one, must pass it on.

"If you do not read the newspapers you are uninformed. If you read the newspapers you are misinformed"
Mark Twain
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Joined: September 3rd, 2004, 7:46 pm

October 18th, 2011, 8:04 pm #4

I'm reading a neat article in the May 2011 edition of MuzzleBlasts about 18th century trekking, and they are talking about groups that do historic period trekking.

Some the areas they are describing, I've BEEN to........Way cool.

Here is the article::

http://www.nmlra.org/pdfs/web_Article-M ... ekking.pdf

Here is a link to their website:

http://www.nmlra.org/publication.asp

Later,

Geo
My family enjoys trekking the 1740-1840 time period of the fur trade era. There are dozens of "rendezvous" events all over Minnesota every year. We manage to get to 5 or 6 each year. It is something we do with our grown children and small grandchildren. Sleeping in canvas lodges and tipis, cooking with cast iron over open fire, wearing the buckskin, wool and linen, starting fire with flint/steel, throwing tomahawks and knives, shooting black powder guns, and just living for 3 or 4 days in the past. Both the kids (and ourselves) have learned so much about our American and pre-American history.

I love the frontier era prior to the civil war. Especially from the Ohio River Valley area and down your way, Geo. I've read a lot of Allan Eckert on that time period -- fascinating! And traditional black powder shooting has become one of my favorite hobbies the past few years.

I was recently reading on George Washington's early frontier life, up to and including the French & Indian war. One thing that astounds me is how in the world the founders or this country could manage to meet up at pre-determined times/places within the vast wilderness of the entire eastern U.S. and how they were able to communicate over these distances - when it takes me four cell phone calls and maybe a text or two just to meet up with my husband for a later supper in town!

Sorry to ramble - but this is my favorite hobby, after the BW of course.

-Kathy

BTW - Minnesota events celebrating the fur trade era....
Grand Portage has a cool one at the fort there. Deer River, Forest City and Pine City are also very historically accurate in their fur trade rendezvous' and have forts. Ely has one in August but it's just a small "taste" of what the larger ones can offer. Other ones worth checking out are in Perham, Wadena, Isle, Aitkin, Elk River, Detroit Lakes, Owatonna, Winona, Norwood-Young America, Harris, Mantorville, Albert Lea, and I don't even know about the ones in SW Minnesota.
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Joined: May 16th, 2003, 12:40 am

October 18th, 2011, 8:07 pm #5

I'm reading a neat article in the May 2011 edition of MuzzleBlasts about 18th century trekking, and they are talking about groups that do historic period trekking.

Some the areas they are describing, I've BEEN to........Way cool.

Here is the article::

http://www.nmlra.org/pdfs/web_Article-M ... ekking.pdf

Here is a link to their website:

http://www.nmlra.org/publication.asp

Later,

Geo
I'll give this guy a lot of credit. and I bet they never cheat. I have, You can get High tech underwear on under the wool and slip a thermarest under the blanket. I've always wanted to try canoe traveling in the old gear but now I know I'm too old. Gear is heavy and the ground is hard. I still do some reenacting though now it is more on the lines of historical interpretation. The difference being, an interpreter dresses in funny clothes and speaks about the weapons, gear and times to the public and after the event I go sleep at a nice dry motel while a reenactor often runs around shooting at other people in funny clothes and sleeps in a tent, cabin, foxhole or in the open. Thanks for sharing the article.

"If you do not read the newspapers you are uninformed. If you read the newspapers you are misinformed"
Mark Twain
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Joined: September 17th, 2005, 2:21 pm

October 18th, 2011, 8:51 pm #6

I'm reading a neat article in the May 2011 edition of MuzzleBlasts about 18th century trekking, and they are talking about groups that do historic period trekking.

Some the areas they are describing, I've BEEN to........Way cool.

Here is the article::

http://www.nmlra.org/pdfs/web_Article-M ... ekking.pdf

Here is a link to their website:

http://www.nmlra.org/publication.asp

Later,

Geo
a prior lifetime but still have my wool - native dress that I would wear and my trade silver- Several rendezvous in IL- Wi and one of the best is Feast of the Hunter's Moon in West Lafayette Indianna - man that was one cool event! A must attend at some point if you can.

That was where I picked up my first pair of Poppen moccasins which I still wear - you can now get them at Piragis- but I love Poppen mocs they are the best -

Yep - BLoody Lake rendezvous was always a blast as the morels were usually out - so that was fun too -

My ex and his family still do this and they go to civil war mostly - a lot of history being preserved through these events.

What sets a canoeing expedition apart is that it purifies you more rapidly and inescapably than any other travel. Travel a thousand miles by train and you are a brute; pedal five hundred on a bicycle and you remain basically a bourgeois; paddle a hundred in a canoe and you are already a child of nature.

~ Pierre Elliot Trudeau
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Joined: May 10th, 2003, 2:25 am

October 18th, 2011, 11:56 pm #7

My family enjoys trekking the 1740-1840 time period of the fur trade era. There are dozens of "rendezvous" events all over Minnesota every year. We manage to get to 5 or 6 each year. It is something we do with our grown children and small grandchildren. Sleeping in canvas lodges and tipis, cooking with cast iron over open fire, wearing the buckskin, wool and linen, starting fire with flint/steel, throwing tomahawks and knives, shooting black powder guns, and just living for 3 or 4 days in the past. Both the kids (and ourselves) have learned so much about our American and pre-American history.

I love the frontier era prior to the civil war. Especially from the Ohio River Valley area and down your way, Geo. I've read a lot of Allan Eckert on that time period -- fascinating! And traditional black powder shooting has become one of my favorite hobbies the past few years.

I was recently reading on George Washington's early frontier life, up to and including the French & Indian war. One thing that astounds me is how in the world the founders or this country could manage to meet up at pre-determined times/places within the vast wilderness of the entire eastern U.S. and how they were able to communicate over these distances - when it takes me four cell phone calls and maybe a text or two just to meet up with my husband for a later supper in town!

Sorry to ramble - but this is my favorite hobby, after the BW of course.

-Kathy

BTW - Minnesota events celebrating the fur trade era....
Grand Portage has a cool one at the fort there. Deer River, Forest City and Pine City are also very historically accurate in their fur trade rendezvous' and have forts. Ely has one in August but it's just a small "taste" of what the larger ones can offer. Other ones worth checking out are in Perham, Wadena, Isle, Aitkin, Elk River, Detroit Lakes, Owatonna, Winona, Norwood-Young America, Harris, Mantorville, Albert Lea, and I don't even know about the ones in SW Minnesota.
In fact, have all of his Stuff with regards to the OHIO river valley.

A friend of my is the Curator of the Filson club here in louisville. If you're into the living history stuff, this is a TON of stuff in this area.

Nice reading about your re enacting.

Later,

Geo
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Joined: May 10th, 2003, 2:25 am

October 19th, 2011, 12:02 am #8

I'll give this guy a lot of credit. and I bet they never cheat. I have, You can get High tech underwear on under the wool and slip a thermarest under the blanket. I've always wanted to try canoe traveling in the old gear but now I know I'm too old. Gear is heavy and the ground is hard. I still do some reenacting though now it is more on the lines of historical interpretation. The difference being, an interpreter dresses in funny clothes and speaks about the weapons, gear and times to the public and after the event I go sleep at a nice dry motel while a reenactor often runs around shooting at other people in funny clothes and sleeps in a tent, cabin, foxhole or in the open. Thanks for sharing the article.

"If you do not read the newspapers you are uninformed. If you read the newspapers you are misinformed"
Mark Twain
They are CRAZY about it......if you cannot provide multiple pieces of evidence with regards to a piece of clothing or equipment, you're NOT using it in a re enactment. I've seen some serious stuff.....

And I've met some great folks.

For any of you who have read anything about the time period, you know how hard it is to shoot a muzzle loader, let alone shoot and reload all at a FULL SPEED run. I have some friends who actually practice that had have a course they use at some treks to practice it.

And, AND, for those who have heard of Daniel Boone, you should read about Lewis Wetzel, or Simon Girty, or Simon Kenton, or Simon Greathouse, or Squire Boone, or about a million other frontiersman...

FANTASTIC reading.........you wonder how those folks survived......

Later,

Geo
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Joined: March 25th, 2005, 12:16 pm

October 19th, 2011, 12:05 am #9

My family enjoys trekking the 1740-1840 time period of the fur trade era. There are dozens of "rendezvous" events all over Minnesota every year. We manage to get to 5 or 6 each year. It is something we do with our grown children and small grandchildren. Sleeping in canvas lodges and tipis, cooking with cast iron over open fire, wearing the buckskin, wool and linen, starting fire with flint/steel, throwing tomahawks and knives, shooting black powder guns, and just living for 3 or 4 days in the past. Both the kids (and ourselves) have learned so much about our American and pre-American history.

I love the frontier era prior to the civil war. Especially from the Ohio River Valley area and down your way, Geo. I've read a lot of Allan Eckert on that time period -- fascinating! And traditional black powder shooting has become one of my favorite hobbies the past few years.

I was recently reading on George Washington's early frontier life, up to and including the French & Indian war. One thing that astounds me is how in the world the founders or this country could manage to meet up at pre-determined times/places within the vast wilderness of the entire eastern U.S. and how they were able to communicate over these distances - when it takes me four cell phone calls and maybe a text or two just to meet up with my husband for a later supper in town!

Sorry to ramble - but this is my favorite hobby, after the BW of course.

-Kathy

BTW - Minnesota events celebrating the fur trade era....
Grand Portage has a cool one at the fort there. Deer River, Forest City and Pine City are also very historically accurate in their fur trade rendezvous' and have forts. Ely has one in August but it's just a small "taste" of what the larger ones can offer. Other ones worth checking out are in Perham, Wadena, Isle, Aitkin, Elk River, Detroit Lakes, Owatonna, Winona, Norwood-Young America, Harris, Mantorville, Albert Lea, and I don't even know about the ones in SW Minnesota.
Big Island Rendezvous & Festival.... over 600 lodges....first weekend in October in Albert Lea,MN
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Joined: May 10th, 2003, 2:25 am

October 19th, 2011, 12:09 am #10

a prior lifetime but still have my wool - native dress that I would wear and my trade silver- Several rendezvous in IL- Wi and one of the best is Feast of the Hunter's Moon in West Lafayette Indianna - man that was one cool event! A must attend at some point if you can.

That was where I picked up my first pair of Poppen moccasins which I still wear - you can now get them at Piragis- but I love Poppen mocs they are the best -

Yep - BLoody Lake rendezvous was always a blast as the morels were usually out - so that was fun too -

My ex and his family still do this and they go to civil war mostly - a lot of history being preserved through these events.

What sets a canoeing expedition apart is that it purifies you more rapidly and inescapably than any other travel. Travel a thousand miles by train and you are a brute; pedal five hundred on a bicycle and you remain basically a bourgeois; paddle a hundred in a canoe and you are already a child of nature.

~ Pierre Elliot Trudeau
http://www.tcha.mus.in.us/docs/2011Batt ... ration.pdf

Re enactors from around the country will be there. This was supposed to be the great turning point in Tecumseh's war against the white man. Had his brother not caused such a ruckus, MAYBE Tecumseh would have had a chance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecumseh

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecumseh%27s_Confederacy

Lots of NEAT stuff........

Later,

Geo
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