What colour toorie on WW2 Black Watch tam o'shanter?

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What colour toorie on WW2 Black Watch tam o'shanter?

Craig
Craig

July 5th, 2010, 4:27 am #1

What colour toorie did the Black Watch of Canada have on the tam o'shanter during WW2? Was the toorie red like the hackle, or was it a khaki toorie?
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Bryan Carney
Bryan Carney

July 5th, 2010, 6:11 pm #2

Craig, This photo should help out. From all the photos I have seen the Khaki Toories were used.

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/data ... f9icsels01
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Craig
Craig

July 6th, 2010, 6:58 pm #3

Could this possibly be a Black Watch tam o'shanter?

http://www.germanmilitaria.com/OtherNat ... 84462.html

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Bryan Carney
Bryan Carney

July 6th, 2010, 8:12 pm #4

It appears to be a private purchase but I see nothing that would make it specifically Canadian. But im sure there is others that might be able to offer more information.
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Clive
Clive

July 7th, 2010, 1:39 am #5

Could this possibly be a Black Watch tam o'shanter?

http://www.germanmilitaria.com/OtherNat ... 84462.html
Without getting into the unit ID isn't this an officer's Balmoral?
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Craig
Craig

July 9th, 2010, 3:47 am #6

What colour toorie did the Black Watch of Canada have on the tam o'shanter during WW2? Was the toorie red like the hackle, or was it a khaki toorie?
All of this highland headwear can get confusing!

Based on what I have learned so far, it is my understanding that the Highland regiments wore the khaki Tam O' Shanter in the field (with officers perhaps wearing khaki balmorals instead). The diced glengarries were allowed to be worn for walking out and more formal occasions. But what about the diced balmorals (sometimes referred to as Kilmarnock bonnets)? I could find no mention of the diced balmorals in "Dressed to Kill". I have seen examples of the diced balmorals, but have never seen a WW2 era picture of a soldier wearing one. When would these have been worn? By whom?
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Clive
Clive

July 9th, 2010, 4:26 am #7

Only worn in uniform if the uniform was for a curling team.
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Bryan Carney
Bryan Carney

July 9th, 2010, 2:21 pm #8

All of this highland headwear can get confusing!

Based on what I have learned so far, it is my understanding that the Highland regiments wore the khaki Tam O' Shanter in the field (with officers perhaps wearing khaki balmorals instead). The diced glengarries were allowed to be worn for walking out and more formal occasions. But what about the diced balmorals (sometimes referred to as Kilmarnock bonnets)? I could find no mention of the diced balmorals in "Dressed to Kill". I have seen examples of the diced balmorals, but have never seen a WW2 era picture of a soldier wearing one. When would these have been worn? By whom?
Hello all,
The Tam mentioned before does look like an officers style tam. I have seen several different pictures where officers had a different cut of tam. Where it was a smaller surface area around the Toorie. This is the quickest picture I can find but it appears that the TOS that Major Ewing is wearing is smaller in construction then the Soldiers on the left.

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/data ... f9icsels01

Glengarries on the other hand I have seen mostly on Pipers.

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/data ... f9icsels01

But there is also this picture of the Black Watch of Canada in 1940 where the one soldier coming off the ship is wearing one.

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/data ... f9icsels01

Hope this helps... Cheers

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Joined: February 1st, 2006, 6:13 pm

July 9th, 2010, 2:33 pm #9

All of this highland headwear can get confusing!

Based on what I have learned so far, it is my understanding that the Highland regiments wore the khaki Tam O' Shanter in the field (with officers perhaps wearing khaki balmorals instead). The diced glengarries were allowed to be worn for walking out and more formal occasions. But what about the diced balmorals (sometimes referred to as Kilmarnock bonnets)? I could find no mention of the diced balmorals in "Dressed to Kill". I have seen examples of the diced balmorals, but have never seen a WW2 era picture of a soldier wearing one. When would these have been worn? By whom?
Originally posted by Craig: "But what about the diced balmorals (sometimes referred to as Kilmarnock bonnets)? I could find no mention of the diced balmorals in "Dressed to Kill. I have seen examples of the diced balmorals, but have never seen a WW2 era picture of a soldier wearing one. When would these have been worn? By whom?"

Actually Clive, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise's) Cadet Corps wore the Kilmarnock bonnet in the 1960's/early 1970's, as did female members of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise's) Militia in the early 1970's, during the transition from BD to the CF Green uniform/Work Dress uniform and with Combats. The Kilmarnock bonnet worn by both Cadets and the unit was of the same colours and dicing as that of the Argylls Glengarry.

Cheers

Mark
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Craig
Craig

July 9th, 2010, 2:38 pm #10

All of this highland headwear can get confusing!

Based on what I have learned so far, it is my understanding that the Highland regiments wore the khaki Tam O' Shanter in the field (with officers perhaps wearing khaki balmorals instead). The diced glengarries were allowed to be worn for walking out and more formal occasions. But what about the diced balmorals (sometimes referred to as Kilmarnock bonnets)? I could find no mention of the diced balmorals in "Dressed to Kill". I have seen examples of the diced balmorals, but have never seen a WW2 era picture of a soldier wearing one. When would these have been worn? By whom?
I have seen a couple of WW2 era diced balmorals (kilmarnock bonnets) with the C broad arrow mark inside. Would these have been government issue if only worn with civilian attire?

I have also seen one that was clearly marked on the tag inside as a curling cap!
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