Surrender in Tokyo Bay

Joined: October 13th, 2014, 2:27 pm

August 13th, 2018, 9:38 pm #1

I was recently in the Edo Museum in Tokyo where they had a copy of the surrender document. I am not sure if this was a real copy or a photocopy. My wife and I noticed that the space for the Canadian representative to sign was left blank. Why didn't we send someone to sign it? We fought against the Japanese in Hong Kong and Alaska.Or was this copy missed or if it faded? Anyone know the story?

John
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Joined: January 9th, 2007, 1:32 am

August 13th, 2018, 10:11 pm #2

I was recently in the Edo Museum in Tokyo where they had a copy of the surrender document. My wife and I noticed that the space for the Canadian representative to sign was left blank. Why didn't we send someone to sign it? We fought against the Japanese in Hong Kong and Alaska.Or was this copy missed or if it faded? Anyone know the story?
Read volume 2 of Richard S. Malone's memoirs A World in Flames (1984). He was present at the time and wrote about it in the book. The Canadian rep was serving in Australia and had to be rushed up to Tokyo for the ceremony, as my hazy recollection recalls. That's the only version of the Canadian presence on VJ-Day that I've read.

Cheers,
Dan.
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Joined: August 30th, 2004, 12:47 pm

September 3rd, 2018, 12:50 pm #3

Colonel Cosgrave was the Canadian representative.   Google his name to get the full story, this is the 'juicy bit'.

He caused a little-known mishap; Colonel Cosgrave inadvertently placed his signature one line too low on the Japanese copy of the documents. He signed on the line for the French Republic. This was attributed to his being blind in one eye, having lost sight in this damaged eye in the First World War. This set off an unfortunate chain whereby each succeeding signer also signed one line too low on that copy of the documents.
Air Vice-Marshal Leonard Monk Isitt, the Dominion of New Zealand representative, left without a blank to sign, had to have his name and country written in at the bottom margin of the document. Cosgrave did not repeat this error on the American copy. The error was "corrected" by General Sutherland who crossed out "French Republic" and wrote in "Dominion of Canada" then made similar corrections for the rest of the document.[2] Both the U.S. and Japanese copies of the surrender documents are on display on the USS Missouri, now berthed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
Lawrence Moore Cosgrave knew Mamoru Shigemitsu (who accepted the surrender of Japan for the Japanese Emperor and Government) from their diplomatic days in Shanghai. It is reported that their eyes met when Mamoru Shigemitsu boarded the Missouri, they mutually smiled with recognition, and then Mamoru Shigemitsu realized where he was and became stern and serious. They met each other again a number of years later in London, England, at the Coronation of Elizabeth II in 1953.
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Joined: October 13th, 2014, 2:27 pm

September 11th, 2018, 10:25 pm #4

Thanks. I wish that I knew that when I was looking at it in Tokyo. It is kind of funny.
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