Scale of Issue

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Scale of Issue

Bill A
Bill A

February 3rd, 2008, 3:34 pm #1

While doing some research through LAC archives documents, I came across a reference to procurement and the number of patches and titles per soldier in 1942. These 1942 documents indicated 6 pairs of titles and patches per man for 6 months. This was a procurement document, and not a scale of issue.
Does anyone know the actual scale of issue in the regiment or unit that was used to distribute titles and patches? I suspect it would vary depending on the qms and unit, but the number of titles and patches that any one soldier would receive over the period of service appears to be far larger than I originally believed.
Other documents in the same 1942 group gave numbers of patches and titles to be procured for the corps and divisions. For example CPC 1st Canadian army was 50 pairs, while RCASC 1st Canadian Army was 3700 pairs. Plain divisional patches 1st, 2nd and 3rd CID were indented for 19,000 pairs. This would roughly be 2-3 pairs of patches per man. This excludes the divisional corps troops like RCASC, RCCS, RCE, CDC,and CPC.
Final note on the research. This document group covered the period of the Dieppe raid. There is extensive correspondence asking for the IMMEDIATE shipment (by bomber mail) of badges and patches from Canada. The list of badges requested includes the units decimated at Dieppe.
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Ed Storey
Ed Storey

February 3rd, 2008, 9:01 pm #2

Bill, this may be too early for what you are after but C.A.S.F. Routine Order No. 65 dated 11 October, 1939 lists:

1 Cap Badge
1 pair of Collar Badges and
2 pairs of Shoulder badges

per man in Horsed, Dismounted and Kilted Units.

The RO appears to have still been in effect throughout 1940 as I did not spot any changes for that year.
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Bill A
Bill A

February 3rd, 2008, 10:11 pm #3

Thanks Ed, That must have changed, and I will have to keep an eye as I work through the documents. It may not be in there, as the documents are not RO's or GO's. The procurement information suggests that each soldier got a lot more than a few titles. Cloth wore / faded out and would have to be replaced frequently, so a larger scale of issue would have made sense.
Just a note on your scale of issue, I believe that the 2 pairs of shoulder badges refered to metal shoulder badges or worsted slip-ons. I don't think the worsted was on issue at that point in time, and coloured cloth shoulder titles were still in the future. (Excpet for a couple of regiments and corps.)
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Ken Joyce
Ken Joyce

February 3rd, 2008, 10:34 pm #4

From what I have seen from various units, the standard was two pairs of shoulder titles. It is possible that so early in the war, they were not quite aware of procurement difficulties that would quickly develop. ie. numbers required, the conservation of wool and slow shift to printed titles. Considering each man only wore at most two tunics, ie BD and W out Dress ( Service Dress ) or two BD etc. why would they need more than two pairs? If they required more, then they could ask for them. I have also read in many places that numbers issued were soon restricted due to many giving them away as souvenirs or trading etc. This applies to shoulder titles and cap badges. It is also interesting that difficulties in issue arose for certain units due to large shipments of badges being sunk by the enemy.

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 3rd, 2008, 10:54 pm #5

Thanks Ed, That must have changed, and I will have to keep an eye as I work through the documents. It may not be in there, as the documents are not RO's or GO's. The procurement information suggests that each soldier got a lot more than a few titles. Cloth wore / faded out and would have to be replaced frequently, so a larger scale of issue would have made sense.
Just a note on your scale of issue, I believe that the 2 pairs of shoulder badges refered to metal shoulder badges or worsted slip-ons. I don't think the worsted was on issue at that point in time, and coloured cloth shoulder titles were still in the future. (Excpet for a couple of regiments and corps.)
Only four units in 1939 were entitled to embroidered unit titles; PPCLI, the two regiments of Guards, and the Canadian Provost Corps. As pointed out by Bill, the others wore metal titles or else worsted "slip ons" on Battle Dress. The colourful cloth badges started to appear in 1941 though the 2nd Division did not start to wear them until "after Dieppe", opting instead for the battle patch geometric shapes over the div patch as outlined in Clive's book.
Michael Dorosh
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canadiansoldiers.com
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