Re-enacting

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Re-enacting

Colin M
Colin M

May 15th, 2010, 4:19 am #1

Hello

I a thinking of putting together a WW2 Canadian uniform for re-enactment purposes.

Was looking at WPG but have heard that the P37 BD is British and not Canadian colour. Is there a better place to get a Canadian look or is dying the only option?

If I must dye, is there a readily available recipe?

I tried searching but could n't seem to find an answer.

Thanks for any assistance

Colin M in Edmonton
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Doug Townend
Doug Townend

May 15th, 2010, 11:53 am #2

visiting the museums in your area or the militaria dealers of which Edmonton has a few, or visit the Museum of the Regiments in Calgary. At the museums you can speak to knowledgeable people who can answer your questions.

You should also consider buying one or two books from Service Publictions on WW2 uniforms and webbing.

Finally, take a look at the photos on this website.
DT.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2010, 11:59 am #3

Hello

I a thinking of putting together a WW2 Canadian uniform for re-enactment purposes.

Was looking at WPG but have heard that the P37 BD is British and not Canadian colour. Is there a better place to get a Canadian look or is dying the only option?

If I must dye, is there a readily available recipe?

I tried searching but could n't seem to find an answer.

Thanks for any assistance

Colin M in Edmonton
One of the 1 Can Para reenactors did have a dye "recipe" for the WPG battledress, but did not publish it. I believe his intent was to charge people for his services, so he retained the information rather than make it public.

You might try asking Jerry for a swatch of fabric and do some experiments of your own.

Forest green Tintex or a similar dye available at Wal-Mart can be done in the washing machine. I've dyed Swedish tunics to a really great field-grey colour, and I've changed brown repro British stuff into acceptable "Canadian" tints using the forest green shade, but it takes some experimentation and a strong heart.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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Abner Picklewhite
Abner Picklewhite

May 15th, 2010, 3:30 pm #4

Or you can look for the 1950's surplus Greek battle dress. It's very close in style and colour to the CDN P37 including the bandage pocket on the front of the leg.
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Ed Storey
Ed Storey

May 15th, 2010, 5:03 pm #5

One of the 1 Can Para reenactors did have a dye "recipe" for the WPG battledress, but did not publish it. I believe his intent was to charge people for his services, so he retained the information rather than make it public.

You might try asking Jerry for a swatch of fabric and do some experiments of your own.

Forest green Tintex or a similar dye available at Wal-Mart can be done in the washing machine. I've dyed Swedish tunics to a really great field-grey colour, and I've changed brown repro British stuff into acceptable "Canadian" tints using the forest green shade, but it takes some experimentation and a strong heart.
The post-WWII Canadian 49 Pattern BD is already the correct colour and can be converted to a WWII look.
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Joined: June 17th, 2008, 8:09 pm

May 15th, 2010, 10:24 pm #6

Hello

I a thinking of putting together a WW2 Canadian uniform for re-enactment purposes.

Was looking at WPG but have heard that the P37 BD is British and not Canadian colour. Is there a better place to get a Canadian look or is dying the only option?

If I must dye, is there a readily available recipe?

I tried searching but could n't seem to find an answer.

Thanks for any assistance

Colin M in Edmonton
Hello,

James Owens ( of the QOR living history group) and I (Black Watch) have been working together to produce a WW II BD uniform for our members in the US. We have wool of the correct color, near perfect weave (hardest part) and quality tailoring that we are producing for our own units. If you are interested, you can contact us for more details. We should be able to produce more uniforms later in the summer after our tailor completes other projects.

Cheers,
Paul
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Colin M
Colin M

May 16th, 2010, 5:50 pm #7

Thanks gents. I will keep my eyes open and see what I can pull off. The 49 convert is feasible.

Have several books on the subject including yours of course Mike.
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Rick Randall
Rick Randall

June 11th, 2010, 4:15 am #8

Colin,

I'm the Chief Cat Herder of the US based slice of the 1CanPara reenactors.

I've got directions that I used to dye a Jerry Lee blouse into a shade that falls within the range of WWII Canadian uniforms. Been meaning to do a set of trousers I've got hanging about, too. . . but I don't have proper Canadian buttons for it, so no rush.

Be happy to share them with you. If you want to pay me, you can send a bag of Canadian BD buttons. (We can't find any down here -- we have guys buying Smurf sized cadet or bleach-ruined stuff, just to strip them of buttons.)

While converting the post war trousers is cheap and easy (basicaly, you just need spare fabric that pretty much matches your trousers, keeping in mind wartime tolerances for "match" in pieces and dye lots), you'll play Hell doing a good conversion of a post-war blouse.

One thing to watch for. While many guys have dyed them, khaki linings and all, and they look OK, when I used the same instructions, by khaki linings ended up a VIVID bluish-green, and I ended up replacing all the lining and hand sewing it in (the latter because I've never used a sewing machine, and my wife refuses to let me experiment with her very expensive one -- although she DID do the buttonholes for me). Even though it SEEMS like a pain, you'll want to remove your linings FIRST, tack the raw wool edges down do they stay creased, and tack the wool pieces together where the lining holds stuff together. It is WAY easier if you can just return teh original linings (already formed and creased to fit PERFECTLY in your uniform), rather than making new ones from scratch and sewing THEM in. Then you'll KNOW your linings won't bleed and ruin a good shirt, or end up a color more resembling an Amazon rain forest tree frog than BD.

Rick
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Thomas
Thomas

June 12th, 2010, 5:22 am #9

I've got 5 in Colo interested in 1st Can Para. Could you guys put us in the loop?
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/1stcanadianpara/
Please excuse the B Coy 1st Can Para, we were under the assumption the Nebraska boys fell off the earth.
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Joined: February 7th, 2005, 8:53 pm

June 14th, 2010, 1:09 am #10

No, you're right -- the B Coy guys seem to have been abducted by aliens. I'm with the HQ Coy group, mostly on the Eastern Seaboard.

You can check our website at www.1canpara-hq.org, but our webmistress is in teh prcess of rebuilding it, and is swamped by her paying job right now.

Rick
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