Please vote now: How to treat off topic posts

This is the general discussion area of the canadiansoldiers.com website; a forum in which issues pertaining to 20th Century military history from a British and Canadian perspective can be discussed freely. Posters are asked to please do others the courtesy of posting with their name rather than a pseudonym.

Please vote now: How to treat off topic posts

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 19th, 2010, 2:33 pm #1

<script language="Javascript" src="http://www.network54.com/Votelet/55772? ... \n</script>

Bonus votelet:

<script language="Javascript" src="http://www.network54.com/Votelet/55774? ... \n</script>
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
Reply
Like
Share

Michael Reintjes
Michael Reintjes

November 19th, 2010, 2:39 pm #2

What about those plaid trews I sent you the link to?....do Engineers have a Tartan?
Reply
Share

David Clark
David Clark

November 19th, 2010, 3:14 pm #3

Really enjoy reading through the Forum and do enjoy Ed.

Yes, I agree, it does help if you do some reading once & a while.
However, there are a lot of educated persons on this Forum and a little bit of advice/infomation from those wise old owls is always appreciated by those who are looking for an answer.

Cheers!

D.C->



Reply
Share

Ed Storey
Ed Storey

November 19th, 2010, 3:19 pm #4

What about those plaid trews I sent you the link to?....do Engineers have a Tartan?
The plaid won't be too bad, but I am not sure about the high collared shirts...
Reply
Share

Abner Picklewhite
Abner Picklewhite

November 19th, 2010, 4:36 pm #5

Micheal R. and Ed.

It's TARTAN, not plaid. My mothers house dress was plaid. Canadian soldiers wear tartan. There are several good books on the subject that you both may want to look into like.

Woah, that felt good.

AB
Reply
Share

Ed Storey
Ed Storey

November 19th, 2010, 6:06 pm #6

I know, it is very relaxing recommending a book....

I think Clive has one in the works "Plaid to Tartan - A Chronological Listing 1852-2010"
Reply
Share

Geoff Middleton
Geoff Middleton

November 19th, 2010, 6:07 pm #7

Micheal R. and Ed.

It's TARTAN, not plaid. My mothers house dress was plaid. Canadian soldiers wear tartan. There are several good books on the subject that you both may want to look into like.

Woah, that felt good.

AB
It is hard to give good responses to people all the time. I have noticed that Ed (and others of course too) does temper his response when he sees an obviously sincere request. Those badly formed,obscure and sometimes dense questions do tend to get the response they deserve.

And I, reallY; hAte Poor: uSe of punctuAtion! and cApItAls.
Reply
Share

Clive
Clive

November 19th, 2010, 8:27 pm #8

<script language="Javascript" src="http://www.network54.com/Votelet/55772? ... \n</script>

Bonus votelet:

<script language="Javascript" src="http://www.network54.com/Votelet/55774? ... \n</script>
If Ed doesn't tell people to buy a book then my sales will drop dramatically!!!
I guess the best attitude to take is that of the old adage - if you have nothing good to say then shut up. I too have been guilty of losing it with some dumb postings but manage to ignore them rather than respond.
Reply
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 19th, 2010, 11:36 pm #9

I originally posted this in response to Dan's comments in the RCN/Sabre Sales thread - I'll repeat it here, slightly modified:

This is a forum set up for the discussion of 20th Century Canadian Army topics, with a focus on history and uniforms, as those are my interests. From that main topic, we start to see some breakdown of "side" interests. Collectors make up a large part of the interested parties here. That's not technical "history" but it's related, so I gladly entertain such discussions. Re-enactors are another similar category. Other hobbies such as scale modelling and wargaming are connected. Genealogy is another big part of the picture. Many different facets of the main topic.

Recognizing that the Canadians served as part of the UK's war effort, in so many ways, from training manuals to the zone of communication to being part of 21st and 15th Army Groups, etc., I expanded the focus of the board early on - 10 years ago I think - to include "British" in the forum description. "Commonwealth" crept in somewhere also.

Over the years, as noted, it has become apparent that those who like to talk about 20th Century Canadian Army "stuff" also often have an interest in the other services, and find it difficult to find appropriate venues to ask questions, particularly regarding collecting questions, and find it easy to get quick answers here. This has not been a burden since the atmosphere I've wanted to foster is that if you're among friends, a slight deviation isn't a great bother, as long as it doesn't get to be intrusive.

If I don't lock up a thread or delete it on sight, or caution anyone, I think you can presume that you're safe in responding (keeping on topic to the original query). If a judgment call needs to be made as to the appropriateness of the original question, perhaps going forward, I would be the best one to make that call. If there are concerns that the forum is straying too far from the beaten path, please feel free to email me at madorosh@shaw.ca and we can work this out.

I may need to revise the rules at the top of the forum and post some stronger advice on this.

Otherwise, usual common sense stuff applies; respect and courtesy goes a long way. Clive mentions "dumb posts." It may sound trite, but I don't believe in dumb questions. Some people have certainly expressed a bit of exasperation about stupid answers, and I don't necessarily agree with that either. On the one hand, people come here with all good intentions looking to seek help knowing that there are well-respected, knowledgeable people with a reputation for being helpful and informative, if not entertaining. On the other hand, those same informative people sometimes show fatigue and impatience when answering questions they believe to be elementary or if they receive no appreciation (by which I mean the simple courtesy of a word of thanks), or if they suspect the motives of the person asking the questions (an extreme example is an ebay fake artist canvasing for free advice on how to make first rate counterfeit badges).

Basically, best advice is treat others as you would want to be treated. I will watch a little more closely how off-topic and newcomers are responded to, and if some "battle fatigue" sets in I will prefer to deal with it via email. Which is why I prefer the use of real names and emails, and have had no qualms in the past, and continue not to, about deleting "Anonymous" posts on sight, particularly the disrespectful ones.

Hopefully this clears up some issues for the benefit of all.
Last edited by dorosh on November 19th, 2010, 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: February 5th, 2005, 4:07 pm

November 20th, 2010, 12:56 pm #10

For what it's worth, if you persist in limiting this to the 20th Century and don't begin to expand into the 21st Century, you're going to be left behind when the next generation of collectors and enthusiasts get into A'stan stuff. My humble prediction is that there is going to be extreme interest in modern day equipment, weapons, and uniforms, making it difficult to draw that line in the sand between the late 20th Century and the early 2000s.

A new generation of "experts" in modern-day equipment, uniforms, combat vehicles, and weapons will be among us, spawning a new generation of authors without which there would be no future recommendations from Ed for "books".
Reply
Like
Share