Mini-Museum Curating

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Mini-Museum Curating

Geoff Middleton
Geoff Middleton

January 23rd, 2010, 8:52 pm #1

The thread about the collection for sale got me thinking about how best to manage a collection. I suspect there are more than a few of you out there that are hyper-organized. I am thinking of Ed Storey for example, who seems to come up with wonderful, detailed photos and quick answers on most any artifact.

My methodology is somewhat detailed, but probably not as efficient as it could be. I keep a catalogue in MS Access for all my militaria acquisitions that allows me to search quickly and identify potential holes in the overall collection. I catalogue by item name, country, NSN, manufacturer, size, condition, price, purchase place and price. What I don't do (yet) is photograph items in a consistent way as it appears Ed does.

I don't catalogue my books which sometimes leads to duplicates. And the paper bits are really hard to manage.

My girls gave me a brass plaque engraved "Army Museum" so at least I am officialy recognized by some important people. They forgot about the Navy and Air Force bits though.

Any good ideas?

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 23rd, 2010, 9:12 pm #2

Paying your daughters a higher wage would give them the incentive to do a better job of researching the signage.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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Ed Storey
Ed Storey

January 23rd, 2010, 9:38 pm #3

The thread about the collection for sale got me thinking about how best to manage a collection. I suspect there are more than a few of you out there that are hyper-organized. I am thinking of Ed Storey for example, who seems to come up with wonderful, detailed photos and quick answers on most any artifact.

My methodology is somewhat detailed, but probably not as efficient as it could be. I keep a catalogue in MS Access for all my militaria acquisitions that allows me to search quickly and identify potential holes in the overall collection. I catalogue by item name, country, NSN, manufacturer, size, condition, price, purchase place and price. What I don't do (yet) is photograph items in a consistent way as it appears Ed does.

I don't catalogue my books which sometimes leads to duplicates. And the paper bits are really hard to manage.

My girls gave me a brass plaque engraved "Army Museum" so at least I am officialy recognized by some important people. They forgot about the Navy and Air Force bits though.

Any good ideas?
Thanks for the kind words, but I am not as organized as you think I am.
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Doug Townend
Doug Townend

January 23rd, 2010, 10:30 pm #4

The thread about the collection for sale got me thinking about how best to manage a collection. I suspect there are more than a few of you out there that are hyper-organized. I am thinking of Ed Storey for example, who seems to come up with wonderful, detailed photos and quick answers on most any artifact.

My methodology is somewhat detailed, but probably not as efficient as it could be. I keep a catalogue in MS Access for all my militaria acquisitions that allows me to search quickly and identify potential holes in the overall collection. I catalogue by item name, country, NSN, manufacturer, size, condition, price, purchase place and price. What I don't do (yet) is photograph items in a consistent way as it appears Ed does.

I don't catalogue my books which sometimes leads to duplicates. And the paper bits are really hard to manage.

My girls gave me a brass plaque engraved "Army Museum" so at least I am officialy recognized by some important people. They forgot about the Navy and Air Force bits though.

Any good ideas?
Sounds like you have things well-organized.

I would add one item to a database - location - to identify where I am storing the item and I would give every box, storage area, etc a simple code to identify where it is located.

I have all my CWAC collection stored in boxes or on hangers in two cupboards. The large items are easy to find but its the itty-bitty items you need the identifier for.

DT.
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Joined: February 1st, 2006, 6:13 pm

January 24th, 2010, 1:22 am #5

Gee Doug ... do I detect an Ordnance/Service Corps background here ...

Cheers

Mark
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Doug Townend
Doug Townend

January 24th, 2010, 3:06 am #6

Yup!! You're darn tootin!! RCOC forever!!

DT.
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Geoff Middleton
Geoff Middleton

January 24th, 2010, 4:07 am #7

Sounds like you have things well-organized.

I would add one item to a database - location - to identify where I am storing the item and I would give every box, storage area, etc a simple code to identify where it is located.

I have all my CWAC collection stored in boxes or on hangers in two cupboards. The large items are easy to find but its the itty-bitty items you need the identifier for.

DT.
There has been many a time I've been scratching around looking for an item I was sure I had put somewhere. I think I will add that field.
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Ed Storey
Ed Storey

January 24th, 2010, 3:13 pm #8

Gee Doug ... do I detect an Ordnance/Service Corps background here ...

Cheers

Mark
The location field "In the Basemeent" does not seem to work that well for me...
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Steve F
Steve F

January 24th, 2010, 6:38 pm #9

Ed, after visiting your place a couple of months ago I have to say that you do an amazing job locating items in your collection storage zone. My collection is a fraction of yours and I misplace stuff all the time.... well done on your part. Mind you, you do have a very extensive collection of photos of your stuff that is quite impressive as well and is something that I would like to emulate.
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Ed Storey
Ed Storey

January 25th, 2010, 12:38 am #10

Steve, it was good to have you over, thank you,

ED
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