Looking for a Canadian Victoria Cross copy to display

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Looking for a Canadian Victoria Cross copy to display

David R. Clark
David R. Clark

December 8th, 2009, 6:34 pm #1

I'm looking for a high-quality Canadian Victoria Cross copy to display
with "Pro Valore"

Anyone have any suggestions?

Cheers,

D.C->
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 8th, 2009, 11:44 pm #2

Have they even minted any real ones, much less copies? There was a discussion here not long about about what kind of metal to use. There has been controversy about the "captured bronze cannon" used to make British Victoria Crosses and how it may be mythical in some cases. Interesting topic.
Michael Dorosh
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canadiansoldiers.com
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John Cameron
John Cameron

December 10th, 2009, 9:36 pm #3

Hopefully the Canadian VC will carry on the tradition and be made from the Chinese made bronze gun captured from the Russians. There is still a good chunk left of it. As of a couple of years ago there were 7 blank VCs in the vault at Hancock's, I believe they are now down to 6?
Jeremy Clarkson of Top Gear fame presented a documentary on the VC and Maj. Robert Cain VC a few years ago. Here a a few caps:

Clarkson with the prototype.

The bronze cannon metal in a military vault.

A view showing the relative size of the chunk of bronze.

Tray of seven unissued VCs in the vault at Hancock's Jewelers
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 11th, 2009, 12:35 am #4

Hopefully the Canadian VC will carry on the tradition and be made from the Chinese made bronze gun captured from the Russians.

Thanks for the info, and interesting comment. Why "hopeful"? I understand the historical significance to the British VC, but I wonder if something more appropriate couldn't be found for a Canadian VC. We weren't even a country when the cannon was captured by British troops in the Crimea. It doesn't seem to have much connection to "us" other than the fact we've awarded it 90+ times.

I wonder what official thought has been given to this.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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Clive
Clive

December 11th, 2009, 2:14 am #5

This booklet was released last year and has details on the composition of Canada's VC. You will note that, although a small slice of the Bronze was used, the VC is very much a Canadian product.
http://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/dhh-dhp ... cv-eng.pdf
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 11th, 2009, 2:37 am #6

Thanks for that; it looks like they achieved a perfect solution.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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Rick Randall
Rick Randall

December 11th, 2009, 6:12 pm #7

Reminds me of the steel in the bow of LPD21 (USS New York).
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Terry Hunter
Terry Hunter

December 11th, 2009, 7:41 pm #8

I'm looking for a high-quality Canadian Victoria Cross copy to display
with "Pro Valore"

Anyone have any suggestions?

Cheers,

D.C->
Unless I'm missing something, I can't find Capt Frederick Thorton Peters who was born in Charlottetown, PEI in this book. Although this book lists "Members of the Canadian Military who won the VC" with the pics (Peters was with the Royal Navy), Veterans Affairs Lists him as a Canadian and also has him in the Canadian Virtual War Memorial (CVWM).

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub. ... ons/peters

"Frederick Thornton Peters was born in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, on the 17th of September 1889, son of the Attorney General and the first Liberal Premier of that province. He was educated at St. Peter's Private School, later went to school in Victoria, British Columbia, and from there to Naval School in England. He graduated as a midshipman and three years later he received his commission as a sub-lieutenant. During the First World War he was decorated with the Distinguished Service Order, the first ever given to a Canadian, and the Distinguished Service Cross for gallantry in action. Following the action which won him the Victoria Cross, he was proceeding to England when the plane he was in crashed and he was killed. He has no known grave but his name appears on the Naval Memorial at Portsmouth, England."

CVWM link -http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub. ... ty=2495305
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Joined: March 15th, 2006, 3:45 pm

December 14th, 2009, 7:07 pm #9

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