John Walker and WW2

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John Walker and WW2

Gordon Pringle
Gordon Pringle

December 18th, 2001, 6:08 pm #1

Today the USA is trying to figure out what to do to the American, John Walker who was caught while fighting for the Taliban/al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. Was there any precedents set in WW2 of a German or Japanese/Canadian,Brit,American or Aussie fighting for the wrong side in WW2 and if so what became of them. Further, whats the views out there regarding Mr. Walker.
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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

December 18th, 2001, 10:31 pm #2

There was a few British draftee types in the B.F.C., as they joined to their own free will to better their position(better living conditions,better food etc,) as a P.O.W.'s, while in German Custody for the "most" part! However their were some real scumbags who were British Fascists' and in the British Army who captured at Dunkirk,France,and decided to "join" their cause against Communism!

There was also one Japanese Canadian-nicknamed the Kamloops kid who hated Canadian P.O.W.'s because of racist insults as a kid while living in British Columbia,Canada as a child,he moved to Japan in the 1930's and joined the I.J.A., in order to do his "part" for Japan,and when he was posted to Hong Kong,The Canadian P.O.W.'s received his "Special" treatments (beatings,killings etc,.)He was later jailed and Hanged after the War(1947-48.)
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Gordon Pringle
Gordon Pringle

December 19th, 2001, 12:05 am #3

Thanks Chris was this person hung because of his mistreatment of POWs or being a turncoat? Every so often you read of Germans telling their opposites about living and growing up in Canada. Wonder what ever became of them, hmmmmm. As for Walker I think the U.S. will have a devil of a time making a case against him.
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Chris
Chris

December 19th, 2001, 12:37 am #4

Today the USA is trying to figure out what to do to the American, John Walker who was caught while fighting for the Taliban/al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. Was there any precedents set in WW2 of a German or Japanese/Canadian,Brit,American or Aussie fighting for the wrong side in WW2 and if so what became of them. Further, whats the views out there regarding Mr. Walker.
No doubt, Mr. Walker will provide a field day for the media. I'm certain that finding an American among the Taliban was an idea not even considered.

If the government rules/decides against putting him in front of a military tribunal, the odds are very likely that he'll be released without incurring any penalties for his treasonous activities.

We'll also very likely be subjected to an OJ Simpson style media circus in which violation of personal rights will make inelligible most of the information he provided to the now-dead CIA agent that initially questioned him.

The fact that he actively sided with a combatant-force actively fighting against US Forces will become an annoying side item, instead of the focal issue which it is.

All the civil liberty fanatics will be quick to point of that society failed this young man and that it's irresponsible for us to hold him accountable for his actions at such a young age. After all, we didn't do anything to Hanoi Jane (Fonda). The point will be argued that this poor (upper middle class) youth was led astray by those teaching him about terrorist-style fundamentalism.

How was he, a mere then 18-year old, to know that beating women for the heinous crime of exposing an ankle or, god-forbid, having footwear that made noises was wrong??? Shame on us for thinking such things.

We would have been better off leaving him with all the other foreign national fighting for the Taliban. They'll all almost certain of being executed by the Afghani's or their respective hime countries.

My opinion is that he should be tried by a military court, convected and then drawn and quartered at ground zero.

Better yet, we should make him undergo a sex-change operation and then parachute him into some Taliban-like area so he can live on the rules and lifestyle he was so eager to apply to others.
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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

December 19th, 2001, 12:58 am #5

Glad to see your not bitter over this,.....or are you!? :-P

Every nation(s) has it turncoats,..every now and then,..which reminds me,...about a certain Benedict Arnold-During the American(Yankee Rebel Scum)Revolution during the years 1775-83,.

At First He was an "American" Patriot,..then he did a quick look around decided the British's had a better offer for "his" services,....and pull a fast one on you guys! (Hey if you don't belive me look at your country's history.)

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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

December 19th, 2001, 1:04 am #6

Thanks Chris was this person hung because of his mistreatment of POWs or being a turncoat? Every so often you read of Germans telling their opposites about living and growing up in Canada. Wonder what ever became of them, hmmmmm. As for Walker I think the U.S. will have a devil of a time making a case against him.
He was tried and convicted(1947-48) on "both" counts!! Every country will so often always have it's traitor's or the as they like to call themselves-"victim's" of modern society ie,lack of care for them when they were growing up!
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Michael Dorosh
Michael Dorosh

December 19th, 2001, 1:28 am #7

No doubt, Mr. Walker will provide a field day for the media. I'm certain that finding an American among the Taliban was an idea not even considered.

If the government rules/decides against putting him in front of a military tribunal, the odds are very likely that he'll be released without incurring any penalties for his treasonous activities.

We'll also very likely be subjected to an OJ Simpson style media circus in which violation of personal rights will make inelligible most of the information he provided to the now-dead CIA agent that initially questioned him.

The fact that he actively sided with a combatant-force actively fighting against US Forces will become an annoying side item, instead of the focal issue which it is.

All the civil liberty fanatics will be quick to point of that society failed this young man and that it's irresponsible for us to hold him accountable for his actions at such a young age. After all, we didn't do anything to Hanoi Jane (Fonda). The point will be argued that this poor (upper middle class) youth was led astray by those teaching him about terrorist-style fundamentalism.

How was he, a mere then 18-year old, to know that beating women for the heinous crime of exposing an ankle or, god-forbid, having footwear that made noises was wrong??? Shame on us for thinking such things.

We would have been better off leaving him with all the other foreign national fighting for the Taliban. They'll all almost certain of being executed by the Afghani's or their respective hime countries.

My opinion is that he should be tried by a military court, convected and then drawn and quartered at ground zero.

Better yet, we should make him undergo a sex-change operation and then parachute him into some Taliban-like area so he can live on the rules and lifestyle he was so eager to apply to others.
I was under the impression that he moved out there before the terrorist attacks and had nothing to do with them.

Freedom of religion is a cornerstone of American democracy - does that only count if you pick the right one?

I am glad the Taliban has been deposed, and I think their brand of "religion" sucks. I also think that an American has the right to go to Afghanistan and practice it. If he was taken in arms against the US, you need to ask if he had sworn an oath to the US military.

I was under the understanding he was a civilian, so he was not in breach of any such oath.

Should his citizenship be revoked? Sure. Drawn and quartered? Let's drop the hyperbole and hysteria.

Look at the Legion of St. George in WW II - most were pardoned, a couple were hung.

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Michael Dorosh
Michael Dorosh

December 19th, 2001, 1:30 am #8

There was a few British draftee types in the B.F.C., as they joined to their own free will to better their position(better living conditions,better food etc,) as a P.O.W.'s, while in German Custody for the "most" part! However their were some real scumbags who were British Fascists' and in the British Army who captured at Dunkirk,France,and decided to "join" their cause against Communism!

There was also one Japanese Canadian-nicknamed the Kamloops kid who hated Canadian P.O.W.'s because of racist insults as a kid while living in British Columbia,Canada as a child,he moved to Japan in the 1930's and joined the I.J.A., in order to do his "part" for Japan,and when he was posted to Hong Kong,The Canadian P.O.W.'s received his "Special" treatments (beatings,killings etc,.)He was later jailed and Hanged after the War(1947-48.)
You don't finish the example, Chris. Most of the BFC men got light prison sentences or acquittals - they certainly weren't hung, though some ringleaders were. There were about 60 of them, some were near morons, who had been promised better food, opportunities for sex, and the promise they would only serve against the Russians, not the English.

I think justice was done; they didn't betray any great secrets, though had they actively fought against the western allies, I would take a much dimmer view of their conduct.
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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

December 19th, 2001, 1:58 am #9

I forgot to mention that they were mostly pardoned,Thanks for pointing out the rest of the story,Mike.
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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

December 19th, 2001, 2:15 am #10

I was under the impression that he moved out there before the terrorist attacks and had nothing to do with them.

Freedom of religion is a cornerstone of American democracy - does that only count if you pick the right one?

I am glad the Taliban has been deposed, and I think their brand of "religion" sucks. I also think that an American has the right to go to Afghanistan and practice it. If he was taken in arms against the US, you need to ask if he had sworn an oath to the US military.

I was under the understanding he was a civilian, so he was not in breach of any such oath.

Should his citizenship be revoked? Sure. Drawn and quartered? Let's drop the hyperbole and hysteria.

Look at the Legion of St. George in WW II - most were pardoned, a couple were hung.
Kiddin' aside for the moment,I have to agree with you there Mike,as Free of expression is a right not a privilege! What I was trying to say to Chris is that their always will be a certain percentage of the population of a country who will not agree with the current govt,thought or ideals!!

Look at The American "Vietnam" Draftdodgers who left the U.S.of A.,because the felt it wasn't a "just cause" to die for!(They came to Canada for the most part,a few fled to exile to Europe.)they were supposed to be deported from the countries who gave them safe haven,then thrown in Jail.(But most free loving govt's ignored the U.S.Govt's decree.)A few years ago a black gentleman-I can't remember the name,but he just got pardoned from former President Clinton, and the first time in nearly 30+ years came back to his "homeland",.....all because he was exercise his freedom of expression,...!(he didn't feel the Draft broad was fair or non-racist! ie, an all white officer lead committee.)
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