Canadian Nationals in US Military During Vietnam Era

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Canadian Nationals in US Military During Vietnam Era

Dallas Hardy
Dallas Hardy

July 12th, 2009, 1:39 pm #1

Is anyone aware of documentation discussing how many Canadians served in the US armed forces during the Vietnam era? Or has anyone ever heard of a number they feel is fairly accurate? I'm not working on any projects, just curious.
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Christopher Furlotte
Christopher Furlotte

July 12th, 2009, 2:08 pm #2

Dallas,
This might be of some interest to you, hope it answers your questions!?


http://www.angelfire.com/ca5/canadianvi ... ress2.html



Chris
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Dallas Hardy
Dallas Hardy

July 12th, 2009, 4:42 pm #3

Spot on. Thanks.
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Ken Joyce
Ken Joyce

July 12th, 2009, 7:50 pm #4

Again it seems another book about how the US was defeated in Vietnam. I really question this and I am not impressed with the use of Peter Kent for anything. Sometimes I wonder who were more communist, the US and Canadian media during Nam or the Viet Cong. What you never hear about are the countless people in Vietnam who fought to maintain their way of life ( the indigenous people ) and those who wanted to maintain a democracy regardless of its corruption. It is a lie to state that the Vietnamese wanted communism. Most shoving communism down their throats were Chinese or of more recent Chinese descent just like what was going on throughout the rest of SE Asia after WW2. Vietnam was not a US military failure but a political failure. Ex Defense Secretary McNamara just died and I am sure many a vietnam vet is not the least bit sorry to hear it. Like any war fought under the leadership of a Liberal or a Democrat, it seems to amount only to waste. Yes Nixon took over the war but only after almost a decade of Democrat stupidity. The people in the rest of the world were lied to by the media when they only reported the success of communist infiltration. An infiltration that during the Tet offensive resulted in the near annihilation of the 60,000 communists involved. Once this was hailed as a victory for Ho, the war could not be maintained resulting in a US pullout and the deaths of countless non-communist innocents including thousands of indigenous people that supported US involvement. There is a huge part of the story of the Vietnam war that has not been told or emphasized because the western media and their hippy freak friends are still proud of their communist victory in Vietnam. (Yes I have said this before however the whole situation pisses me off)
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Ken Joyce
Ken Joyce

July 12th, 2009, 8:38 pm #5

While this is a website by the Degar people of today fighting for their human rights, it is an interesting perspective and largely, if not entirely factually correct.

http://www.montagnard-foundation.org/opinion.html
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Christopher Furlotte
Christopher Furlotte

July 12th, 2009, 10:10 pm #6

Again it seems another book about how the US was defeated in Vietnam. I really question this and I am not impressed with the use of Peter Kent for anything. Sometimes I wonder who were more communist, the US and Canadian media during Nam or the Viet Cong. What you never hear about are the countless people in Vietnam who fought to maintain their way of life ( the indigenous people ) and those who wanted to maintain a democracy regardless of its corruption. It is a lie to state that the Vietnamese wanted communism. Most shoving communism down their throats were Chinese or of more recent Chinese descent just like what was going on throughout the rest of SE Asia after WW2. Vietnam was not a US military failure but a political failure. Ex Defense Secretary McNamara just died and I am sure many a vietnam vet is not the least bit sorry to hear it. Like any war fought under the leadership of a Liberal or a Democrat, it seems to amount only to waste. Yes Nixon took over the war but only after almost a decade of Democrat stupidity. The people in the rest of the world were lied to by the media when they only reported the success of communist infiltration. An infiltration that during the Tet offensive resulted in the near annihilation of the 60,000 communists involved. Once this was hailed as a victory for Ho, the war could not be maintained resulting in a US pullout and the deaths of countless non-communist innocents including thousands of indigenous people that supported US involvement. There is a huge part of the story of the Vietnam war that has not been told or emphasized because the western media and their hippy freak friends are still proud of their communist victory in Vietnam. (Yes I have said this before however the whole situation pisses me off)
G-day Lads,
Dallas, glad to be of some help!? If I come across anything else, I'll send it your way asap! Ken, I'm doing some reading on the war in the 1950's,and 1960's in S.E. Asia. Canada, almost sent Military Forces, in 'Nam in the 1960's, due to political influence of President Lyndon B. Johnson of the U.S.A.,

Here's a historical link on this!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lester_B._Pearson

On a slightly different topic, the Brit's were deeply involved in this conflict as well. MI6, sent highly classified information to the Americans on communist activities during the war of course! Station Chief of "S.I.S." was Mr John Morley in Saigon, Vietnam. The Brit's were asked to send a Brigade Group there as well, they declined the offer however, the British did assist the U.S. Govt in other ways..."

The Aussie's also helped out as well.

http://cybersarges.tripod.com/aussiemem.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_h ... ietnam_War

I'm reading a book on the life of Australian Counter-Insurgency expert, Brigadier F.P. Serong, of the AIF, as he retired from the Australian Army, and he later became the U.S. CIA expert of communist warfare in S.E. Asia. He was the one of the first to create the Jungle Warfare School in Canungra,Queensland Australia. Years later, the Canadian Army were to sent it's soldiers to learn the tricks of survival of jungle warfare etc,. He was one of the last Aussie's to leave the Republic of Vietnam, in 1975!

Chris

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Ken Joyce
Ken Joyce

July 13th, 2009, 12:59 am #7



Hi Chris

Thanks for that info, esp the story of the boyscout, Johnson, the raising of the US flag at expo 67 and those pigs in the FLQ.

Sorry for hijacking the thread Dallas, it just bothers me to read all the nonsense about Vietnam. There are some ok documentaries on the war and some good books that tell the truth however the media continues to tell the same old one sided commie/leftist infected BS story.

The US forces in Vietnam were very successful in their counter-insurgency effort. We always tend to picture the US conscripts without realizing how strong US special forces in Nam were. They all worked successfully together, the US, Aussies and Vietnamese. Hence the photo below taken in January 1967. As for conscripts, even many of them turned out to be skilled soldiers in Vietnam. While corny, the movie "The Green Berets" is probably as close to reality as you will find to represent what the war was really about.


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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 13th, 2009, 1:57 am #8

It may interest the participants in this thread to know that the majority of U.S. servicemen to serve in Vietnam were volunteers, not conscripts.

A warning, though - if you can't avoid emotional language like 'pigs', 'Commies', etc., I will shut the conversation down. Keep it on a higher plane, or take it someplace else.

For what it is worth, I tend to doubt the average rice farmer really cared what kind of government was in Saigon when people with guns were marching through their fields, so the idea that the Communists did nothing but preach "propaganda" while the shining forces of Democracy were welcomed with open arms in the agrarian sectors is probably just as much fiction as whatever Ho Chi Minh was selling.

There were all kinds of (legitimate) reasons for the west to be involved in Vietnam, and Australian, U.S., Korean, Thai troops did a tough job in the field and from all accounts fought hard and well for a way of life I personally find preferable to a centrally planned economy. It is unfortunate things didn't work out, but even more unfortunate so many people - on both sides - had to die and that so little had ultimately been accomplished in the eyes of so many. The real achievements - that the west would stand up to aggression - was an intangible that is still not recognized by many.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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Christopher Furlotte
Christopher Furlotte

July 13th, 2009, 3:27 am #9


Hi Chris

Thanks for that info, esp the story of the boyscout, Johnson, the raising of the US flag at expo 67 and those pigs in the FLQ.

Sorry for hijacking the thread Dallas, it just bothers me to read all the nonsense about Vietnam. There are some ok documentaries on the war and some good books that tell the truth however the media continues to tell the same old one sided commie/leftist infected BS story.

The US forces in Vietnam were very successful in their counter-insurgency effort. We always tend to picture the US conscripts without realizing how strong US special forces in Nam were. They all worked successfully together, the US, Aussies and Vietnamese. Hence the photo below taken in January 1967. As for conscripts, even many of them turned out to be skilled soldiers in Vietnam. While corny, the movie "The Green Berets" is probably as close to reality as you will find to represent what the war was really about.


Well, I've found this subject quite interesting from the a Canadian and counter-insurgency standpoint! We as Canadians were not so removed from the "conflict/war" as we previously claim to be ie, Peacekeeping role etc,.

I have a copy of my dads old The Royal Canadian Regiment, The connecting file 1973.

In page 57, It show Sargent Harry Baldwin, with a rather large friend, snake in the land of "OZ"! During The Vietnam war he was one of the thirty Canadian soldiers whom trained in Tropical Warfare Techniques Course, at Canungra, Australia, October-November in 1973 during the war. He appears to be wearing Aussie "Jungle Greens" uniform for this training, along with Canadian manufactured boonie cap with maple leaf flag sewn on it. Sorry I don't have a scanner, otherwise I post the photograph.

Brigadier Ted Serong,DSO,OBE. was one of the creators of this type of jungle warfare school.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Serong


Finally, Ken nice photo of the green beret with his Aussie S.A.S.,counter-part as they did training/service together during the war. New Zealand also had a Infantry Company attached to the Australian Task Force in Nui Dat,RVN.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealan ... ietnam_War

Just found this on youtube, and thought you guys might enjoy this old classic....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH4-tOqLH94

Chris
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Ken Joyce
Ken Joyce

July 13th, 2009, 4:03 am #10

It may interest the participants in this thread to know that the majority of U.S. servicemen to serve in Vietnam were volunteers, not conscripts.

A warning, though - if you can't avoid emotional language like 'pigs', 'Commies', etc., I will shut the conversation down. Keep it on a higher plane, or take it someplace else.

For what it is worth, I tend to doubt the average rice farmer really cared what kind of government was in Saigon when people with guns were marching through their fields, so the idea that the Communists did nothing but preach "propaganda" while the shining forces of Democracy were welcomed with open arms in the agrarian sectors is probably just as much fiction as whatever Ho Chi Minh was selling.

There were all kinds of (legitimate) reasons for the west to be involved in Vietnam, and Australian, U.S., Korean, Thai troops did a tough job in the field and from all accounts fought hard and well for a way of life I personally find preferable to a centrally planned economy. It is unfortunate things didn't work out, but even more unfortunate so many people - on both sides - had to die and that so little had ultimately been accomplished in the eyes of so many. The real achievements - that the west would stand up to aggression - was an intangible that is still not recognized by many.
Ok Michael will tone down the remarks. Not sure what else to call them? have any suggestions? someone willing to shoot a child for raising a flag and another group responsible for millions and millions of deaths worldwide. A death toll I might add that dwarfs the holocaust into minutia.

You are also very very wrong about the thoughts of a rice farmer in a field in Vietnam. Who do you think did all the fighting in the war???? Frankly a silly remark and I am actually shocked that you could, in anyway, defend the sort of communism envisioned by the few to control the many. Under the communists those very same rice farmers were denied shools, medical facilities and practically all would loose that rice paddy they were standing in. Thousands of children died from lack of medicine and medical treatment while directly under the control of the communists. I personally think they had a lot to think about and not just about farming.
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