Artillery Terminology 1918

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Artillery Terminology 1918

Joined: February 1st, 2007, 9:27 pm

April 29th, 2009, 11:53 pm #1

The War Diary of 5th Battery, Canadian Garrison Artillery then located LIEVEN on 9 February 1918 contains the following entry;

"A destructive shoot was successsfuly carried out by Aeroplane observation on M.B. NZ 16. Fire was opened at 3:40 p.m. and 21 rounds expended ranging during which we obtained 5 Y's, 2 Z's and 7 A's".

Can any of the gunners on this forum provide a translation of the terms 5Y 2Z and 7A?
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dale
dale

May 9th, 2009, 12:43 pm #2

i'll take a poke at it. it sounds like, they ranged knowen targets and registered them for later fire missions. so i'm guessing the number & letter is a designation of the target.
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Clive M. Law - Service Publications
Clive M. Law - Service Publications

May 9th, 2009, 1:10 pm #3

"On Target", "Close enough to target to scare it" and "No idea where that went!"
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dale
dale

May 9th, 2009, 1:34 pm #4

would they be using morse code between ground and op aircraft in ww1?
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Kevin Green
Kevin Green

May 9th, 2009, 10:01 pm #5

The WW1 two seaters, not the scouts had huge, inefficient radios in them. They were not popular and never perfected according to the biographies I have read, but they did have them and they did work some times. That would open the door to your questionable alpha/numeric characters being a daily code. That would be just about impossible to track down.

Good luck.
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Ken MacLean
Ken MacLean

May 12th, 2009, 12:41 pm #6

The War Diary of 5th Battery, Canadian Garrison Artillery then located LIEVEN on 9 February 1918 contains the following entry;

"A destructive shoot was successsfuly carried out by Aeroplane observation on M.B. NZ 16. Fire was opened at 3:40 p.m. and 21 rounds expended ranging during which we obtained 5 Y's, 2 Z's and 7 A's".

Can any of the gunners on this forum provide a translation of the terms 5Y 2Z and 7A?
The folks over at the Great War Forum had the answer:

[/IMG]

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Joined: January 9th, 2007, 1:32 am

May 12th, 2009, 2:33 pm #7

Ken,

I checked every artillery and Great War reference I had in my library and couldn't find the answer to your question. Did the other forum provide a reference?

It looks like Clive had the best guess answer out of anybody. I still wonder where the other seven rounds landed.

Cheers,
Dan.
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Joined: February 1st, 2007, 9:27 pm

May 12th, 2009, 3:51 pm #8

Hi Dan,

The answer to my post at the GWF included a link to a previous GWF discussion on the subject which includes references and some good gen regarding communications with aircraft.

I agree, Clive had a plausible if somewhat crude explanation of the terminology. Maybe he was in the know and was just having us on .

Here is the link to the original GWF thread:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forum ... ntry994727

Cheers, Ken
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Michael Dorosh
Michael Dorosh

May 12th, 2009, 4:01 pm #9

The folks over at the Great War Forum had the answer:

[/IMG]
There is a similar diagram in my book YORKTON'S GUNNERS; sorry I missed this conversation until now. I don't recall if I included discussion of the codes in relation to the range, but the clock diagram looks familiar.
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Clive M Law - Service Publications
Clive M Law - Service Publications

May 12th, 2009, 11:21 pm #10

Hi Dan,

The answer to my post at the GWF included a link to a previous GWF discussion on the subject which includes references and some good gen regarding communications with aircraft.

I agree, Clive had a plausible if somewhat crude explanation of the terminology. Maybe he was in the know and was just having us on .

Here is the link to the original GWF thread:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forum ... ntry994727

Cheers, Ken
"best guess", "crude"
I'll have you both know that I am a man of civility, impeccable manners (as befits a former Guards Officer) and reply to forum queries only when I am certain that my knowledge and experience can be of use to the greater good......OK, you got me. It was a wild-ass guess on my part.
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