Angry hero's war medals go on block

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Angry hero's war medals go on block

Walt
Walt

January 11th, 2005, 1:48 pm #1

GLOBEANDMAIL.COM

Angry hero's war medals go on block


By TU THANH HA


UPDATED AT 8:40 AM EST Tuesday, Jan 11, 2005


MONTREAL -- Dollard Ménard was once the country's most famous French-speaking soldier, lionized as a hero after he continued to direct his men despite being wounded five times during the bloody 1942 raid on Dieppe.

Now, eight years after Brigadier-General Ménard's death, his youngest son is auctioning off his father's medals, saying he is frustrated with his attempts to sell them to federal and provincial officials.

The medals and other possessions go on the block at Empire Auctions in Montreal Jan 23-27.

Brig.-Gen. Ménard held, among other awards, the Distinguished Service Order, the French Legion of Honour and the United Nations Bronze Medal for Peacekeeping.

More at the following link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... 11/TPFront/
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Rob Dekker
Rob Dekker

January 11th, 2005, 9:37 pm #2



....too bad they're not being sold by a more reputable auction house...
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Bill Alexander
Bill Alexander

January 11th, 2005, 10:00 pm #3

This is an interesting twist on the "ban the sale of medals" initiative. Perhaps it would be wise to forward this to Mr. Stoffer who said, to paraphrase, nobody needs the money that bad. From the artilce the family is going in to debt simply keeping the memorabilia.
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James Scott
James Scott

January 11th, 2005, 10:30 pm #4

GLOBEANDMAIL.COM

Angry hero's war medals go on block


By TU THANH HA


UPDATED AT 8:40 AM EST Tuesday, Jan 11, 2005


MONTREAL -- Dollard Ménard was once the country's most famous French-speaking soldier, lionized as a hero after he continued to direct his men despite being wounded five times during the bloody 1942 raid on Dieppe.

Now, eight years after Brigadier-General Ménard's death, his youngest son is auctioning off his father's medals, saying he is frustrated with his attempts to sell them to federal and provincial officials.

The medals and other possessions go on the block at Empire Auctions in Montreal Jan 23-27.

Brig.-Gen. Ménard held, among other awards, the Distinguished Service Order, the French Legion of Honour and the United Nations Bronze Medal for Peacekeeping.

More at the following link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... 11/TPFront/
Once again another piece of Canadian history is up for grabs.
Why sell your fathers medals?
Is money worth more?
Maybe that is unfair?
What happened to our sense of honour and pride for those who gave so much that we all could live and prosper in better times.
It's time that the Canadian government stepped up and protected Canada's history, English or French.
Dollard Menard was a Canadian hero. Forget the politics. On August 19 1942 it was the Canadian flag that flew behind him.
If the family has decided its time to sell. The federal government has to learn its time to buy.


Link to the Auction:

http://www.empireauctions.com/montreal.html
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Michael Johnson
Michael Johnson

January 11th, 2005, 11:05 pm #5

GLOBEANDMAIL.COM

Angry hero's war medals go on block


By TU THANH HA


UPDATED AT 8:40 AM EST Tuesday, Jan 11, 2005


MONTREAL -- Dollard Ménard was once the country's most famous French-speaking soldier, lionized as a hero after he continued to direct his men despite being wounded five times during the bloody 1942 raid on Dieppe.

Now, eight years after Brigadier-General Ménard's death, his youngest son is auctioning off his father's medals, saying he is frustrated with his attempts to sell them to federal and provincial officials.

The medals and other possessions go on the block at Empire Auctions in Montreal Jan 23-27.

Brig.-Gen. Ménard held, among other awards, the Distinguished Service Order, the French Legion of Honour and the United Nations Bronze Medal for Peacekeeping.

More at the following link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... 11/TPFront/
Quite apart from the Dieppe side, the India General Service Medal 1936 is very scarce to Canadians, since you had to be serving with the British or Indian Army to get it.

Some Canadians were awarded British/Indian commissions on graduation from R.M.C., usually the top of the class.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 12th, 2005, 1:34 am #6

Once again another piece of Canadian history is up for grabs.
Why sell your fathers medals?
Is money worth more?
Maybe that is unfair?
What happened to our sense of honour and pride for those who gave so much that we all could live and prosper in better times.
It's time that the Canadian government stepped up and protected Canada's history, English or French.
Dollard Menard was a Canadian hero. Forget the politics. On August 19 1942 it was the Canadian flag that flew behind him.
If the family has decided its time to sell. The federal government has to learn its time to buy.


Link to the Auction:

http://www.empireauctions.com/montreal.html
Actually, I think you will find that the "Canadian flag" that flew behind Menard at Dieppe was the Union Jack, or at least the naval ensign on the RN ships that landed him...but I digress!

Why should the government be expected to step in and buy these? If preserving our own history as individual Canadians is unimportant, why should people's tax dollars be taken?

I am all for this historic set of medals finding a home in a Canadian museum, or public collection (did Menard have a school named after him?)

However, is the government really expected to foot the bill every time a set of medals comes up for grabs?

We all kvetched about the proposed legislation about prohibiting the sale of medals, saying that Canadians should be free to buy and sell medals if they choose, since it means they are more likely to be preserved.

I am damn mad every time I hear that 1 million dollars and more is spent on art for the national gallery; I am sure there are people out there in need of an MRI scan who would be equally upset that their access to health care is infringed on because the government was obligated to pay a private citizen to get back a set of medals that were issued to him in the first place, free of charge, from the same pool of taxpayers who now are forced to buy them back.

I think the Menard family bears some responsibility in this, and I also feel they should not profit by government purchase of these medals. If that means they go offshore, so be it. Let PETROCANADA, GULF, CP RAIL, SCOTIABANK or any of a 1000 big ticket law firms step up and do their part for Canada.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 12th, 2005, 1:37 am #7

This is an interesting twist on the "ban the sale of medals" initiative. Perhaps it would be wise to forward this to Mr. Stoffer who said, to paraphrase, nobody needs the money that bad. From the artilce the family is going in to debt simply keeping the memorabilia.
How much room does a set of medals take up?

I understand the comment in the article says that storage of all his memorabilia is costing a lot of money, and that is unfortunate for the family. Do Les Fusiliers Mont Royal not have a regimental museum?

Is the government now to be held hostage each time a set of medals comes up, to not only purchase them, but also every scrap book and uniform item, so as not to "break up the set"?

Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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James Scott
James Scott

January 12th, 2005, 4:26 am #8

Actually, I think you will find that the "Canadian flag" that flew behind Menard at Dieppe was the Union Jack, or at least the naval ensign on the RN ships that landed him...but I digress!

Why should the government be expected to step in and buy these? If preserving our own history as individual Canadians is unimportant, why should people's tax dollars be taken?

I am all for this historic set of medals finding a home in a Canadian museum, or public collection (did Menard have a school named after him?)

However, is the government really expected to foot the bill every time a set of medals comes up for grabs?

We all kvetched about the proposed legislation about prohibiting the sale of medals, saying that Canadians should be free to buy and sell medals if they choose, since it means they are more likely to be preserved.

I am damn mad every time I hear that 1 million dollars and more is spent on art for the national gallery; I am sure there are people out there in need of an MRI scan who would be equally upset that their access to health care is infringed on because the government was obligated to pay a private citizen to get back a set of medals that were issued to him in the first place, free of charge, from the same pool of taxpayers who now are forced to buy them back.

I think the Menard family bears some responsibility in this, and I also feel they should not profit by government purchase of these medals. If that means they go offshore, so be it. Let PETROCANADA, GULF, CP RAIL, SCOTIABANK or any of a 1000 big ticket law firms step up and do their part for Canada.
Okay. I understand it's hard to expect the government to come up with the money every time a family or collector wants to sell something that has historical significance to Canada. There are so many other things that are important to Canadians and need the government's support. This is all true but shouldn't a country care about its own history? Do we in general as Canadians realize how important our past is? Don't we forget to quickly? Items like these are tools of learning and remembrance that need to be shared with all Canadians, not just the privileged few who have the money.

Maybe there should be special circumstances in which items like Menard's medals should ( if the family feels it must) be sold only to public museums or the federal government at a properly pre-determined fair market value and that the government would be obligated to purchase them. Or maybe there should be a law in which you may own such items privately but they must go on public display every so often.

I'm not talking about web sets and helmets here or even more widely awarded medals, rather rarer historical items such as this medal set.

I think that collectors themselves have to take a bit of blame here for sales like these.
It is the private collector who has driven the prices up so ridiculously high that
established museums and our own government (taxpayers) can't afford them.

I acknowledge that it's hard to make a decision between keeping father's medals and buying a new house, but it must be determined that these items have more than monetary value.

It's sad that families feel they need to sell their loved one's medals and such but it's even sadder that pieces of Canadian valour end up on the mantles of the few.



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ken thomson
ken thomson

January 12th, 2005, 5:55 am #9

GLOBEANDMAIL.COM

Angry hero's war medals go on block


By TU THANH HA


UPDATED AT 8:40 AM EST Tuesday, Jan 11, 2005


MONTREAL -- Dollard Ménard was once the country's most famous French-speaking soldier, lionized as a hero after he continued to direct his men despite being wounded five times during the bloody 1942 raid on Dieppe.

Now, eight years after Brigadier-General Ménard's death, his youngest son is auctioning off his father's medals, saying he is frustrated with his attempts to sell them to federal and provincial officials.

The medals and other possessions go on the block at Empire Auctions in Montreal Jan 23-27.

Brig.-Gen. Ménard held, among other awards, the Distinguished Service Order, the French Legion of Honour and the United Nations Bronze Medal for Peacekeeping.

More at the following link: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... 11/TPFront/
I can see a deluge of medals hitting the market ahead of such a proposed ban.

Because of this action we may see many medals leave the country. It would be interesting to see what the governments response to this may be?

I personally would support banning the sale of Canadian Victoria Crosses.
After all is it not illegal for a Congresional Medal of Honour to be sold?

Just my thoughts.
RRegards, Ken
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 12th, 2005, 6:59 am #10

So your only reason for supporting a ban on the sale of the Victoria Cross is "it must be okay, the Americans do it?"

That's pretty weak reasoning.
Michael Dorosh
Webmaster
canadiansoldiers.com
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