Joined: May 7th, 2000, 11:17 pm

December 29th, 2001, 3:50 pm #11

... but unfortunately, we don't have access to those messages yet.

There are some good links on the internet to the 9th Canadian Forestry Company; type the whole name into Google and fill yer boots. It is my understanding they worked with several U.S. Combat Engineer Regiments, one of which was later awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for that period. Between the Yanks and Canucks, a section of line along the Ourthe River was held for five critical days, allowing some elements of the U.S. Army to regroup behind. Canadians even participated in offensive patrols across the river during that time. I have found no mention of names of individuals involved, however, nor of casualties if any.

I'd be interested in hearing more, if anyone finds it.

Geoff
See below, or ref the original topic at:

<b>http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1483633</b>
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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

December 30th, 2001, 10:40 pm #12

The Canadian Forestry Corps would have worn the corps cap badge, but the cloth insignia is a bit more problematic. As Chris suggests, in the UK at some point in time, at least some of the Forestry corps wore the CMHQ patch. (as Canadian Army troops, not as part of CMHQ.) For a time the Forestry Corps also wore the green equilateral triangle patch of the Canadian Forestry Corps. (either wool,felt,or canvas styles).
The No1 Canadian Forestry Group in NW Europe was designated as 21st Army Group troops. The proper patch for this would be the 21st Army shield patch. They may also have wore the Canadian Forestry Corps flash at this time. (In combination with the appropriate formation patch.)
Canadian Forestry Companies were loggers first, but also trained infantry. The nature of their operations made them responsible for their own defence, and they carried arms as well as axes. (Just gotta love the alliteration.)
Does any one know the measurements of the C.F.C. Formation insignia or what it looked like,.../??
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Bill Alexander
Bill Alexander

December 31st, 2001, 12:16 pm #13

Attached is an image of Canadian Forestry Corps insignia. Top, the CFC slip-ons. This insignia was worn early in the war, and was replaced at some point by the flash at the bottom. In the middle, is the canvas version of the Canadian Forestry Corps patch. It has been on an uniform and measures approx 2 3/4in. There is also a photo (in Clive Law's Distinquishing Patches pg 15) of a full Colonel wearing the same style patch.
I have seen wool versions of the Forestry Corps patch. It was much smaller.


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Joined: July 15th, 2001, 1:18 am

January 2nd, 2002, 1:58 am #14

I'll have to look at some other reference material for more insight into the "Forestry Corps"!? I've only seen one cap badge from that unit,as C.F.C.,is not that common enough to collect or research.

Thanks for the detailed Photo's Bill.

Cheer's and Happy New Year:-)
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Len Heidebrecht
Len Heidebrecht

January 2nd, 2002, 2:48 am #15

I have a very worn CFC cap badge in my collection and have seen quite a few others at various shows and occasionally the shoulder flash as well.
Was the CFC only a war time unit, or did it exist between the wars?
Cheers,
Len
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Bill Alexander
Bill Alexander

January 2nd, 2002, 12:25 pm #16

The Canadian Forestry Corps was originally raised in October of 1916. At the end of the first war it was disbanded, apparently sometime in 1919. It was re-created in May 1940, and disbanded again on September 3,1945.
The WWI Forestry corps reached a total of over 30,000 personnel. Their contributions helped, in part, defeat the u-boat menace. By cutting 70% of the lumber required by the Allied armies on the western front, they had earned a badge of honour for Canada.
In addition to traditional lumbering operations, the CEF Canadian Forestry Corps was instrumental in constructing over 100 airfields. (As a note of interest, the CFC employed many other groups as labour, including PoW's and Chinese. This may be the source of a mystery badge which has floated around Canadian collecting circles for a few years. It is a simple oval with the letters C.L.C.,reportedly Chinese Labour Corps.)
There are many different badges for various CEF forestry companies, some quite scarce. The generic cap badge was supposedly introduced late in WWI and again the same design was used in WWII. It is relatively common, as Len suggests. The shoulder flash is more difficult, and the formation patch, an original one, relatively tough. The canvas is not often seen, while the wool / felt is easily faked and should be carefully examined for authenticity.
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Bob Orr
Bob Orr

August 20th, 2003, 2:51 pm #17

I am looking for a photo of the emblem for the Forestry Corp WW1. Thanks Bob
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Bill Alexander
Bill Alexander

August 21st, 2003, 11:22 am #18

The badging of the Forestry Corps in World War One was complicated. Many battalions were raised specifically as forestry companies or battalions. Each had its own cap and collar badges. The Canadian Forestry Corps was formed from many county battalions, including the 224th, 238th, 122nd, 230th,and 242nd, plus many portions of other battalions. Many of these units had cap badges of their county battalion. In "A Source of Pride" (J.Harper), the general service badges for the Canadian Forestry Corps 1916-1918 were modified patterns of the 230th and 238th, basically the pattern of the badges with the numerals removed.
Some sources suggest the World War Two pattern Canadian Forestry Corps badge had its origins in World War 1, and was used late in the First World War as the Corps badge. An example can be seen at the Canuck site address below:
http://www.canadiansoldiers.com/corpshats.htm
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Anonymous
Anonymous

August 21st, 2003, 5:58 pm #19

The Canadian Forestry Corps had members as part of C.M.H.Q.'s, and they wore the Maple Leaf shoulder badge, so I was wondering would they have wore the 1st Canadian Army patch since they were in fact part of that "Formation"!?
I seem to recall that they were award the Pres. unit citation for this action? Am I way off base here?
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Michael Peters
Michael Peters

August 21st, 2003, 5:59 pm #20

N/t
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