blosslover
Site Admin
Joined: March 16th, 2008, 9:31 pm

August 8th, 2011, 10:24 pm #131

Saw I am Number 4 and Unknown on DVD over the weekend. Neither was OMG wow great. I am Number 4 is basically a teen sci-fi flick that if it had been successful would have led to a series. (Quinn from Glee is the human love interest.)

Unknown is Liam Neeson playing a guy in Berlin who loses his identity and what happens. It was formula, but if you like that formula it was good.
Quote
Like
Share

tgir
Site Admin
Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

August 8th, 2011, 11:41 pm #132

I liked Unknown for the Liam Neeson factor. It was good for its genre, with some ambitions of Hitchkock but nothing new/different.
Quote
Like
Share

Krystal
Site Admin
Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

August 11th, 2011, 5:16 am #133

Every woman should watch Made In Dagenham, and if you have a daughter, have her watch it as well. This docudrama is set in 1968 England, where women employees were working under deplorable conditions at the Ford factory, and making a fraction of what the men did. These working class women with no education and humble backgrounds, had the balls to bring Ford motor to it's knees. The movie really made me think of har far women have come, and yet how many modern women have squardered the rights that these women worked to hard to get for them. See it.
Quote
Like
Share

Krystal
Site Admin
Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

August 12th, 2011, 4:52 am #134

Quaratine 2: Terminal. Ok, so pretty mindless but if you like the Walking Dead, this is comparable.
Quote
Like
Share

KMInfinity
Site Admin
Joined: March 17th, 2008, 1:09 am

August 12th, 2011, 1:14 pm #135

Thanks for the rec about the Ford movie Krystal. I'm always looking for something like that for my class.
“You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books! The best weapons in the world!” — The Doctor, S2E2
Quote
Like
Share

Krystal
Site Admin
Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

August 12th, 2011, 3:12 pm #136

KM. this would be perfect as Pittsburgh used to be a union town as well. It would really be thought provoking.

Every woman should see this though, the older ones to remind us what we may have forgotten and the younger ones to learn what they may not know.
Quote
Like
Share

KMInfinity
Site Admin
Joined: March 17th, 2008, 1:09 am

August 17th, 2011, 2:09 am #137

Krystal, I just finished Made in Dagenham. THANKS so much for the rec. It was powerful and well done. Such a shame it didn't get an audience when release this spring.

I get that the movie was trying to portray an honest working class culture, so I am not at all critical of the brief sex scenes, or the raunchy language...but it means I probably can't show it to my class of 14 yr olds. Darn. I'll rec it with the caution to get parental approval.

Hoping to see The Help this weekend. Did anyone see that yet? (Is that in another thread?)
Last edited by KMInfinity on August 17th, 2011, 2:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
“You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books! The best weapons in the world!” — The Doctor, S2E2
Quote
Like
Share

Krystal
Site Admin
Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

August 17th, 2011, 4:54 am #138

Meantime your 14 year olds are probably screwing like rabbits and using F as an adjective but I understand about the parental stuff. Be sure there'd be some Bible thumper who who object to their kid seeing someone in a bra. I would certainly let my 14 year old see it (if I had one).

Wasn't it great though? And what dialogs (I hope) you might get from it.
Quote
Like
Share

tgir
Site Admin
Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

August 17th, 2011, 5:25 am #139

Quick note to say yes, I just saw The Help today. I had read the book when it came out and was pleased/cautious about the film. I feel as though the film is pretty faithful to the book, well acted by all.

I've read some criticisms of the book/film (there is a lawsuit claiming that one of the characters was based upon a real life maid of the author who had been asked not to use her story for one thing) many of which are somewhat legitimate but also reflect the times the book and film were set.

1. Yes, the events were set into motion by a white woman who was only partly looking to help black women. She was also looking to help herself and does seem somewhat naive and insensible of the genuine risks that black women were taking. Not just loss of jobs which would not be easily replaced, but genuine and legitimate fear of personal safety for themselves and their families. This was something I felt in the book and yes, I feel that the book about writing a book still soft pedals the very volatile situation that was brewing and the very, very real danger black people who challenged the system in any way at all, however small, faced. We cannot forget that people were murdered for registering to vote, and for helping others to register to vote. This was only briefly, lightly touched upon.

2. The maids, especially Abailine, speak in a very uneducated manner. Many people would object but I think it is reflective of the times/education level of the people delivering the lines. For the record, I am white and from north of the Mason/Dixon line and and I have family members who spoke in similarly uneducated, uncultured ways. Not all of them, but some of them. Most were farm people and not many had the benefit of beyond a high school education; some less than that because of their economic circumstances.

If I were thinking about showing that film in my class some day, I would certainly preview it. Things parents might object to (aside from what I have mentioned above):

The use of the word shit.

The depiction of a woman who has a miscarriage (you see a lot of blood) and you see her burying the fetus in her flower bed.

The book does not just depict the realities facing black women in Mississippi in the early `1960's but also white women. Skeeter, the protagonist, is a privileged, college educated white woman who does not fit in well with society's or her mother's expectations. She conceives the notion for the book mostly because she really wants to be a journalist and perhaps novelist and has been rejected by a publishing house in NYC. She sees the book as a way out of the life she does not want to live. She stands up to her mother and her Junior League friends but with considerably less at risk and less directly than the maids themselves.

Men are just bit characters which caused my husband to deem it a chick flick (and I asked him if the typical hollywood fare of almost totally male cast films should be called dick flicks and he agreed: they should. Or saugage fests, but I felt that sounded rather borderline pornographic).

I liked the film, with the caveats above. Every single performance was strong. I attended a matinee with the audience comprised of almost exclusively older women, who stayed to watch all of the credits.

KMI, it's probably too mature for your 14 year olds but Matewan is an excellent film about coal miners in WV forming a union in the 20's. Language and violence, from what I remember. Depending on your parents, they might find it too pro union.
Last edited by tgir on August 17th, 2011, 5:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

tgir
Site Admin
Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

August 17th, 2011, 5:29 am #140

OK: Lol at me for saying 'quick note' and then going on and on and one......

Sorry. I guess you guys know to expect that from me.
Quote
Like
Share