KMInfinity
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Joined: March 17th, 2008, 1:09 am

December 30th, 2012, 6:55 pm #161

I'm not a fan of Tarantino either. That's why I asked Dax for a more open minded opinion since I know I'm biased. One of my favorite local columnists had this to say (he's an op ed columnist, mostly political, but occasionally reviews music, books, and movies) :

http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/opi ... ry-667732/
“You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books! The best weapons in the world!” — The Doctor, S2E2
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Dax
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:48 pm

December 30th, 2012, 7:19 pm #162

But I'm a fan, so I'm not unbiased...

He's an excellent filmmaker and storyteller (but the so-full-of-himself thing can be a turn-off, yes).
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Krystal
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Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

December 30th, 2012, 8:24 pm #163

I also want to see Impossibe about the Tsunami sooner or later.
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Krystal
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Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

December 30th, 2012, 9:20 pm #164

The review was about what I had heard from some other sources. I'll pass for sure.
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blosslover
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 9:31 pm

December 31st, 2012, 2:39 am #165

Just saw Les Miz. :) Sad, but good obviously if you like that kind of movie.
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tgir
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

December 31st, 2012, 3:18 am #166

Fence sitting re: Les Miz. I think it's really just that I'm not up for a sad movie now, or one with a lot of sadness in it.

We did see The Hobbit (2 D). Please don't get me wrong: I think it's being well done, etc. BUT: For years before they started filming LOTR, I was really hoping for a wonderful live action version of The Hobbit (there's a halfway decent animated version--very simple animation but good story telling. My kids adored it) that would be suitable for children--not the pre-school set, but school aged and above. Because that's what The Hobbit was to me: a story suitable for children and also adults, a wonderful adventure, full of magic of the best kinds, but not ignoring the dark side of the world, either.

This is not that film. It is bloated, overly long (they added what didn't need to be there and dropped some things that I think they should not have) and so very obviously directed towards adolescents and above. Yes, there were some kids in the audience but none under about age 10 that I saw and we went to a matinee (cheap in our old age. and sleepy). Mostly, young adults.

They've already taken every heroic comic book there was and turned them into adult escapism or rather 'adult' escapism and further turned them into films that are not suitable for children. Children are left with films that are stupid, saccharine, and with no joy or wonder or magic (real or imaginary) or wit nor intelligence. How terrible that adults are co-opting childhood for adults with deep pockets who instead are clinging to childhood themselves or at least avoiding adulthood.

I write this as someone who enjoys TLOTR, the Hobbit, and some, if not all, of the super hero comic book films.

But really, can't we let the kids have something worthwhile?
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Dax
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:48 pm

December 31st, 2012, 5:11 am #167

Yeah, if you're not coming out of the theatre anxiously chanting 'Six more hours! Six more hours!', then maybe Jackson could/should have trimmed it a bit...

>> Children are left with films that are stupid, saccharine, and with no joy or wonder or magic (real or imaginary) or wit nor intelligence.

I've heard mostly positive things about Disney's Wreck-It Ralph, and think Pixar is twelve-for-thirteen for magical, joyful films for the whole family ('Cars 2' is the exception).

I understand your call for more quality kids' entertainment, but I'm not surprised by The Hobbit or the comic book movies for casting as wide a net as possible in attracting audiences... it's all about money...
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Gatekeeper
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Joined: December 23rd, 2007, 4:38 pm

December 31st, 2012, 2:20 pm #168

My kid saw Django. I was shocked to hear she liked Django better than The Hobbit because all she could talk about was how amazing The Hobbit was. She gives Django best movie of the year. She sees a LOT of movies where I on the other hand see one or 2 a year in the theater.

I finally saw 'The Help' OnDemand and LOVED IT! Of course it was a movie I had to watch by myself because hubby isn't into stuff like that.

If we didn't have to wait for the heater repair guy to come today (NO HEAT downstairs ... brrr... bad broke) I would probably venture out to see Django just to be able to give my opinion. Still would like to see Lincoln but that will most likely have to wait for it to come out on video.

Don't hate the slayer ... Hate the Game.
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tgir
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

December 31st, 2012, 7:02 pm #169

Dax wrote:Yeah, if you're not coming out of the theatre anxiously chanting 'Six more hours! Six more hours!', then maybe Jackson could/should have trimmed it a bit...

>> Children are left with films that are stupid, saccharine, and with no joy or wonder or magic (real or imaginary) or wit nor intelligence.

I've heard mostly positive things about Disney's Wreck-It Ralph, and think Pixar is twelve-for-thirteen for magical, joyful films for the whole family ('Cars 2' is the exception).

I understand your call for more quality kids' entertainment, but I'm not surprised by The Hobbit or the comic book movies for casting as wide a net as possible in attracting audiences... it's all about money...
I saw and liked (pretty well) Wreck It Ralph, which was suitable for kids, even if it did cater to a specific stereotype of what girls like (pink candy)--however within the context of a video game so probably not worse than catering to a stereotype of boys (and men) wanting to shoot stuff up. I've just never been into pink or candy (unless it is chocolate). Yes, Pixar is great but it shouldn't be the only decent choice for kids or family friendly film.

But there ought to be actual live action films of good quality for children/families. I know there's a pretty significant market out there because I work with mostly parents of young children who have long discussions about how they'd love to find more decent movies for their kids or something they could take their parents and their school aged kids to go see. I am not holding this films up as any standard of high cinematic achivement, but back in my childhood. we went to the drive in a few times every summer. We brought a bag full of popped popcorn and our pillows. The schedule was this: find a nice spot to park, and let the kids burn off some energy on the play ground at the theater (with parental supervision). Assuming no trips to the doctor to take care of injuries there sustained (that would be me when I fell from the monkey bars and opened a nice gash in my forehead), as darkness fell, you made your trip to the bathroom, and then the car. First up was a nice long good cartoon short--Tweety Bird or Road Runner or Pepee LePew--followed by a family friendly feature length film--usually from Disney. Maybe animated but often not. I remember very well seeing Old Yeller, In Search of the Castaways, Swiss Family Robinson. This would be followed by an 'adult' feature by which I mean something like How The West was Won or Guns of Navaronne or The Man Who Knew Too Much, or some western. We saw Ben Hur which was absolutely fabulous on such a gigantic screen. Little to no swearing, no explicit sex. Mostly we kids were asleep by then, but if we weren't, we weren't traumatized, except for the post chariot scene and parts of any war film. Disney released something decent every year, and re-released something from its vaults.

What I think about the Hobbit is that it didn't cast as wide a net as possible: it cast a net to specifically catch those audiences who wouldn't see it just one time but many times, and again with every newly re-mastered version, etc. If they made it too kid friendly, they risked having the geeks and nerds skip it or be overly critical (they've missed re: critical). It is indeed all about money, which is sad. And probably loses them some money in the end.

If Peter Jackson had really made The Hobbit first, before his budget and his ego got so bloated, we probably would have gotten the film I really wanted.

Went for a drive yesterday and was listening to NPR and multiple really nice piece about television (thought of all of you) and about how people watch and share and discuss (again, thought of you all but even more and the chat and watch over on...now I've forgotten what that site was called--Telenext with SuperSage) and about how television has become higher quality entertainment than film and how that renaissance came about. I'm hoping for such a renaissance for film. I think it will have to come. People my kids' ages are having kids and they aren't going to be satisfied with stupid iterations of stupid Barbie films.

here's a link to a long list. I can see that it is a replay from previously aired pieces but worth reading/listening to if yo can:

http://www.npr.org/search/index.php?sea ... t=cable+tv
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Dax
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:48 pm

December 31st, 2012, 8:22 pm #170

Yeah. As I've gotten older and become more of a worker and a tv-addicted homebody, I'm seeing far fewer movies than I used to... thinking back 15 years ago or so, I'd see all of the Oscar nominees BEFORE the show, and now it's years before I even get to seeing the WINNERS...

I see fewer movies because I stopped going to the theaters regularly (too expensive, too many rude people talking on their phones... and in many cases, I'm going to buy the dvd eventually anyway, so...). I see fewer movies because I watch too much tv. I see fewer movies because... well, a lot of tv IS better, and the good movies that I know ARE out there... they'll wait. I talk tv with my friends (here, facebook, co-workers...). We (most of my circles) DON'T talk about movies much any more... we talk about tv.

It used to be 'oh, I like tv (and soaps) because you can serialize stories, get to know and care about the characters deeper'... but now it's kinda tv-is-better-than-most-films all around... stories, production values, quality of the performances, everything.

Love your drive-in memories. Yeah. That's awesome, and today's kids are missing out on that.




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