blosslover
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 9:31 pm

August 6th, 2010, 12:24 am #111

Wow a bookmobile. In school libraries, there wasn't a designation where I grew up either. My mother worked for a time as a school librarian (though that was before I was born). School libraries in a lot of places are incredibly underfunded, and many don't spend much money on pleasure reading books of fiction. What I remember most about my middle school library was how many magazines it had. They had a good amount of paperbacks, but within 2 years I read most of them. My high school didn't have a great selection of pleasure reading books either, so it was off to the public library either the one of the ones in my county or if I had to I would ask my Mom by title and author to see if it was part of her branch's collection. In NYC, some schools (some of which didn't have school libraries at all), would take field trips to the public library to get books.

BL (who can't believe she wrote that much about libraries...)
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Gatekeeper
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Joined: December 23rd, 2007, 4:38 pm

October 11th, 2010, 2:02 pm #112

I just finished the book The Wolves of Pavlava. It's an intelligent book that make you think. It's full of history and mystery and she ties it together well.

I will be meeting the author next week because she's also one of my BFFs friends. ;)
Don't hate the slayer ... Hate the Game.
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Krystal
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Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

December 30th, 2010, 10:53 pm #113

I am reading Stephen King's latest "Full Dark, No Stars", it is 4 not so short stories and the first 2 are fab. Starting on the last 2 soon. So far they are not supernatural much, just very good writing.
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Gatekeeper
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Joined: December 23rd, 2007, 4:38 pm

December 30th, 2010, 11:52 pm #114

Krystal wrote:I am reading Stephen King's latest "Full Dark, No Stars", it is 4 not so short stories and the first 2 are fab. Starting on the last 2 soon. So far they are not supernatural much, just very good writing.
Krystal, I was going to download it from the Kindle store today but never got around to it. I'm glad you are enjoying it. I love Stephen King to death. I have a couple of books autographed personally to me from him. LOL ... I'm not sure what I will do if I run into him in the near future because everything is on my Kindle. I guess I could have him autograph that because I know it's been done.

Don't hate the slayer ... Hate the Game.
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Dax
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:48 pm

December 31st, 2010, 9:21 pm #115

I didn't read enough in 2010, but I think I liked everything I read, so there's that. I hope to get more read next year. I like to do a mix of impulse - hey, what's this?... sounds good, I will read this - and this-has-been-on-my-To-Read-List-FOREVER-so-I-Have-To - and then there are a few authors I read everything of, and I'm, like, one or two away from having read their entire outputs, so I'll probably finish those to say I did...

Anyway. This year...

Personal Days - Ed Park. Kind of an 'Office' or 'Office Space' modern-day workplace comedy. Divided into parts, with intriguing changes of perspective between them. Very funny.

Varjak Paw
and, a couple months later,
The Outlaw Varjak Paw - S.F. Said. I read these children's books aloud to the class of autistic high school students I was teaching. I've had them awhile because I'm a big fan of the artist (Dave McKean) and I love the premise - a cat that must learn ninja-like ways... but they weren't fascinating reads. Several dull and repetitive stretches. Not BAD, just not as good as I'd hoped they would be. The illustrations were better than the words.

The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaiman. Good book. I'm a big fan and collector of his works, so I have no objectivity here, but... I see why he got a ton of awards for this one...

Drama City - George Pelecanos. I'd been meaning to read some of him for awhile (one of the authors that contributed greatly to The Wire), and a hardcover of this was at Big Lots super-cheap. Good story, moved fast, I know I will be reading more of him.

Odd and The Frost Giants - Neil Gaiman. Also read aloud to kids. Good little story.

Pronto
and
Riding The Rap
and (short story) 'Fire in the Hole' - Elmore Leonard. The books Raylan Givens (of FX's excellent new series Justified) came from. They're good. Despite some changes in his personal biography, the character FEELS/reads the same, and I approve of all the changes the tv show made for themselves to go forward with.

Caught - Harlan Coben. I read all of his books. They go very fast, even if they're very thick. Definite 'page-turners'. Great suspense, twists, characters. He does have a fairly familiar bag of tricks and sometimes the structure of a story is overly formulaic, but... I like mysteries. A lot of mystery writers can be predictable-ish if you read enough of them. Anyway, this one was really good.

Bite Me - Christopher Moore. I read all his (one out of twelve left at year's end - I'll read it and the new one in 2011). Very funny comedies. This is the newest, and the third in a series following vampires in San Francisco (after Bloodsucking Fiends and You Suck... they're all subtitled 'A Love Story').

Broken - Daniel Clay. One of those read-the-back-of-the-cover-and-it-looked-good impulse pick-ups. A first novel. Wow. Really good, has stuck with me, and I've recommended it to a few friends... sad tragedy written in a really funny way... very DARK humor... lies and injustice and dominoes striking other dominoes and making some Really Bad Shit happen...

You Don't Love Me Yet - Jonathan Lethem. I hadn't read any Lethem yet, but had been meaning to... this was kinda fun. Romance and in-fighting within a rock band...

Moist - Mark Haskell Smith. Impulse pick-up from a library visit. Sort of Carl Hiaasen/Elmore Leonard-like... crime novel with crazy characters and situations. Fun. His first book, think there have been three since that I'll eventually get around to...

The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove - Christopher Moore.

What The Dead Know - Laura Lippman. She's David Simon's wife, and I've been meaning to try one of her mysteries for awhile. This is one of the more recent ones (usually, I like to start at the beginning, but this was a non-series stand-alone, so it's okay...) - got this and another paperback real cheap from a school's used book sale, and I have a hardcover of short stories from Big Lots... Anyway. I sped through this book, having to know what comes next. Well-told in multiple time frames. A kidnapping of two little girls from a mall years ago, and a woman coming forward now and saying that she is one of those girls...

What Was Lost - Catherine O'Flynn. Then I picked up this one because it sounded like a cousin of the one I'd just read, somehow, also pertaining to the kidnapping of a little girl from a mall (it even had the same number of chapters in the book as the Lippman, forty-two...) and an advance in time to 25-30 years later in the next section... Really good first book - I want to read her second...

Zeitoun - Dave Eggers. True-life account of Katrina before/during/after atrocities. Well-written. Sad. Anger-making.

The Stupidest Angel, A Heartwarming Tale of Christmas Terror - Christopher Moore. You know, for Christmas. Also had a lot of zombies. Kind of on a zombie kick after The Walking Dead.

-

Now, I'm reading some comic books before I get into my next novel... starting with The Walking Dead (by Robert Kirkman), actually. I have the first six hardcovers (covering 72 issues). So far (about 2/3rds through the first book), I like Darabont's adaptation a lot better... a lot of the same ground is covered, of course - some different characters, a slightly different structuring of the the central love triangle, but a bunch of the same stuff, too (Amy, Jim). I expect I'll like it better as it moves along and away from where the show went in its super-brief first season... I don't mind 'spoilers', as I expect they will be deviating from the source text more than not...

I was really frustrated that there were, like, five major spelling errors in the first six issues. PERHAPS forgivable in a monthly comic, but this is in its umpteenth (well, fourth of the hardcover) printing - that shit should have been fixed, you know?

And I want to catch up on Fables (I'm 8 paperbacks in and have the next two... think 14 are available now...) and its spin-off, Jack of Fables (there will be 9 total, and I haven't read any yet).
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blosslover
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 9:31 pm

December 31st, 2010, 9:32 pm #116

I read the Stupidest Angel a year or more ago. That book was just weird. Currently I am reading a cozy mystery as I didn't have time to read anything serious as of late.
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Dax
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:48 pm

December 31st, 2010, 9:50 pm #117

Which cozy mystery?

Moore - I just love his sense of humor. My favorites have been Fluke (Or, I Know Why The Winged Whale Sings) and Island of the Sequined Love Nun (which had the pilot-and-his-fruitbat character in it), and the vampire ones... and Fool, his Rosencrants-and-Guildernstern-ish take on Lear, from the POV of the court jester... I was a little bored with Coyote Blue and Practical Demonkeeping (his first). The one I've still got to go is Lamb, The Gospel According To Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal (a great title).
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KMInfinity
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Joined: March 17th, 2008, 1:09 am

January 1st, 2011, 9:13 pm #118

Dax, C Moore is still in my Amazon cart thanks to your rec awhile ago. I keep "saving for later" and have over a hundred items "saved." I highly HIGHLY recommend once again to all who like fantasy - Jim Butcher's Dresden Files.

Based on my Amazon orders for 2010....

Commodore Perry in the Land of the Shogun - Great, even handed look at imperialism for middle schoolers. (part of my gilded age unit)

Mockingjay - 3rd in another middle schooler series - but tons of adults love it. Think "Roman Empire history meets Survivor."

Side Jobs: Stories From the Dresden Files - Short Stories that fill the gaps between novels

Control Unleashed - Creating a Focused and Confident Dog - Terrific, but for advanced trainers. Me, just getting started and overwhelmed.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight Volume 7: Twilight - Okay, fandom went a little bonkers over this....imo, the best was the end...

Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season Eight Volume 6: Retreat - Still not a comic book/graphic novel fan. I'm too oriented to print and forget to study the illustrations ans then hear discussionabout points relating to the pics and I'm like, wtf?

FAILURE TO CONNECT: How Computers Affect Our Children's Minds
-- and What We Can Do About It- More or less advocated the draconian elimination of ANY computer use under age 13. Arguments were valid and I'm still ruminating about this. Not that we can ever ut the genie back in the bottle.

Aunt Dimity Down Under (Paranormal Detective) - An excellent cozy, I highly rec this character driven series.

Hanover Square Affair (Mystery of Regency England) - First of the six regency mysteries by Ashley Gardner I read this summer with half-pay Capt. Lacy back from Napoleonic wars as detective. Very good job with historical details.

*********

I'll have to check my shelves for stuff bought at actual bookstores. I seem to order a lot of genre at Amazon, and browse and pick up quirky/literate stuff in bookstores.
Last edited by KMInfinity on January 1st, 2011, 9:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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tgir
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

January 1st, 2011, 9:33 pm #119

Loved the whole Hunger Games series, including Mockingjay--thanks KMI for pointing me in that direction. I also like the Dresden files books but my son and his friends are really, really addicted. I have kind of turned that obsession over to them.

I actually have a stack of things to read. For Christmas, I got Freedom by Jonathan Franzen, Angelology, and Tinker. I also bought Emily The Book Thief, at least partially because I wanted to read it. She left it behind and took the rest of her books with her.

There are a lot of Christopher Moore fans here so if you haven't read it, I would highly recommend Lamb, by Moore.
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Krystal
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Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

January 1st, 2011, 10:20 pm #120

Most note worthy were the Dragon Tattoo books, best I have read in a long time, and a very tough act to follow. Non fiction, Methland, really an eye opener about drugs in rural America.

I have been reading lee Child's Jack Reacher books. Reacher is an ex special forces character who runs around kicking ass Bronson style where ever he wanders. Probably appeal to more guys but I like them.

2 stories into Kings Full Dark No Stars, so far love love love it. The second story should be read by every woman on this board, it is a rape story of a woman with a vengence. I'll let you all know how the last 2 are.
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