tgir
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

August 4th, 2010, 3:20 am #101

Hunger Games is the first in a Young Adult series. I have been restraining myself from purchasing #2 in the series. The third is due out late this month.

Re: the NPR list. I haven't read any of those particular books. I do specifically look at the NPR site for book recommendations and have found some great books there.

I wish it were easier for me to get to the library.
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KMInfinity
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Joined: March 17th, 2008, 1:09 am

August 4th, 2010, 4:55 am #102

I didn't recognize any of the NPR selections except for Kay. He's excellent.
“You want weapons? We’re in a library! Books! The best weapons in the world!” — The Doctor, S2E2
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Krystal
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Joined: June 26th, 2009, 4:32 am

August 4th, 2010, 5:06 am #103

I am reading Passages, justin Cronin. A sort of world ending due to vampires, no romance in it (I hate romance novels). I am not sure I love it.
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lexilou
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Joined: June 20th, 2009, 3:10 pm

August 4th, 2010, 10:58 pm #104

blosslover wrote:read the first book in a trilogy that is called Shiver (by Maggie Stiefvater), this book has werewolves as the theme. As the main character in the book is a girl who was bitten by a pack of werewolves as a child and never made the change, who is star-crossed with one of the wolves. The concept is that in winter they live as wolves, but during the rest of the year they are human. After a certain amount of years, the werewolves no longer spend the spring/summer as human, but stay wolves only. I was surprised by this novel as it is published by Scholastic.
I saw that book online and considered it. Did you like it?

Currently I am slogging though The Magicians. I thought from the reviews it was supposed to be Harry Potter for adults, but so far it doesn't seem like it, except for the magic part. Quentin the genius stumbles into Brakebills which is a school for wizards and flies through his education there. I feel like I missed a few years. The book is just very fast that way, One chapter seems to be a year. Anyway, now he's out in the real world. Not sure I'd recommend this one.

Next I am looking at getting Orange is the New Black, about a woman's year in prison. I've always wondered what it was like in prison, so that should be interesting.

Did I mention this before? I'm 36 and I find myself looking at the young adult section quite often. I feel like I should be too old to shop there, but I like the stories.
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Gatekeeper
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Joined: December 23rd, 2007, 4:38 pm

August 4th, 2010, 11:11 pm #105

Barnes & Noble Considering Sale

Under growing pressure from electronic book sales, the largest U.S. bookseller is considering selling the company.

Read the rest here ~ http://www.informationweek.com/news/har ... ed_IWK_All

~~~

On the brighter side maybe the small bookshops will make a comeback.

Don't hate the slayer ... Hate the Game.
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blosslover
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 9:31 pm

August 4th, 2010, 11:32 pm #106

I did like Shiver, but it had a romantic story to it. The mythology was explained in such a way it wasn't that confusing which was helpful. The author also writes adult books, though I have not read any of those.

I buy what i like, and don't care if it is young adult or not. I remember years ago when I bought Buffy TVS novel tie-ins and in some stores they were in young adult and others sci-fi. It really doesn't matter to me.

B&N being sold--oh no. It is bad enough I have to more than 30 minutes to get to my nearest location.
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tgir
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

August 5th, 2010, 1:18 am #107

I still adore fairy tales and mythology from all over the world.

The label Young Adult (which i don't think existed when I was a young adult) just helps you locate which section of the bookstore or library to find the books.

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lexilou
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Joined: June 20th, 2009, 3:10 pm

August 5th, 2010, 2:54 am #108

Thanks guys!

Re: B&N, there is one right up the street from us which we used as our primary bookstore. My mom went to Borders, and that is close too, but not as close. Anyway, Borders has one of those customer card things and they email coupons every week for 30% an item. Plus, after you spend so much you get a $5 coupon and they send special coupons for certain books or authors. I've started giving the kids $10/month to buy books because I want them to appreciate them more and I've bought a few new ones recently as well. Makes it much easier for me to buy a book I might not like (even if I think I will) for a little less than to spend full price on it. Oh, and the card is free, unlike B&N which has a yearly fee.
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blosslover
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 9:31 pm

August 5th, 2010, 10:26 pm #109

Since you mentioned not having the YA label when you were growing up, tgir, I decided to investigate. Since I was curious, I went looking at the ALA (American Library Association), according to their site they have had a group specifically for YA called the Young Adult Library Services Association which has been around since 1957. Here is a link to their fact sheet. http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/yalsa ... tsheet.cfm

BL (whose Mom is a retired children's librarian, though for a few years she ran a library and had to order at different times both adult and YA books. There were differences in the book lists she was given for each department obviously.)
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tgir
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Joined: March 16th, 2008, 3:36 am

August 5th, 2010, 11:15 pm #110

OK, I believe you. I just don't remember such a designation on our school libraries. My town didn't have a library: In the summers when I was young, the elementary library was sometimes open on Saturdays in the summer, but usually, the bookmobile came. I remember having to talk the librarian in the bookmobile into letting me check out The Odyssey and The Illiad when I was in 5th grade. I had read everything else she had, except for the sports stuff.

The first place I lived with a real library (outside of schools) was when I went to college. I never made it to the city library but stuck with the university one, which was enormous.
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