Why did Bruce break up with Joe Lewis?

Why did Bruce break up with Joe Lewis?

Joined: June 29th, 2018, 1:55 am

July 1st, 2018, 12:58 am #1

I saw in a forum a guy saying that I met two tesmunhas who told him the real reason for Bruce Lee's breakup with Joe Lewis. According to this guy, Joe Lewis would have appeared suddenly in Lee's house accused Lee of having invested in his girlfriend so the two argued and faced each other, Linda separated the two before they faced each other. Does anyone here know if this is the real reason for the breakup between Bruce and Joe Lewis?
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Joined: July 16th, 2003, 11:43 am

July 1st, 2018, 12:30 pm #2

Yes it's true. His first wife Susan said Bruce made a pass at her when she was cutting his hair and Lewis went round to Bruce's house. Bruce told Linda to come and listen to this and Joe left. Linda didn't separate them as there was a door screen separating them.
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Joined: July 16th, 2003, 11:43 am

July 1st, 2018, 1:02 pm #3

Where did you first see Bruce Lee? When did you first meet Bruce Lee? Did he approach you about training together? Where there ever times when you Norris and Stone were all together with Lee training at the same time? 

Joe Lewis: I never watched TV in the 60's, so before I met Bruce Lee, I'd not heard of him. I first met him at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington D.C. at the `67 U.S. National championships. I was defending my title, and he and Robert Culp from the `I Spy' show were there as guests. Bruce Lee approached me and introduced himself. That's how everything began. A few months later I was at Black Belt magazine's Culver City office to see them to complain about a misquote, and Bruce Lee was in their offices. when I went to my car he came running up behind me saying Joe! Joe! Hi, I want to talk to you. And he spent about 15 minutes primarily pitching me on his system and trying to elicit my interest and I basically ignored him. I to this day, don't remember what he did or said to me. Bruce was adamant about keeping us (Norris, Stone and myself) separated. He would make comments about me to the other guys, because they would come and tell me, and vice versa. And I often heard that Bruce Lee would call me stupid, and I was big and strong and dumb. But don't mess with me because I was a bad dude. And then he would talk about Stone being extremely strong and fast, but being ridiculously wild and uncontrollable. And then he would talk about Norris, saying that he was real stiff, saying that he could kick, but had terrible stiff hands. He didn't know anything about punching. So I'm sure if he had us all together, Bruce would be on the hot seat!

What standard did Lee have in accepting students? 

Joe Lewis: Bruce had 2 motives: 1.) to get in movies. He worked with big name directors, producers, writers and actors 2.) to build his stature as a kung fu instructor by working with world champs like myself, Mike Stone and Chuck Norris. That was a smart move cause it paid off. This all paid off. He became the most iconic Asian actor of all time. 

Bruce & yourself were masters at bridging the gap. How much importance did Bruce emphasize in training on footwork to achieve this? Old saying 'The Art of Fighting is the Art of Moving' and we all know that Bruce really respected Muhammad Ali who proved that this was the case. Any comments please about the importance of mastering footwork and how much time did yourself & Bruce spend on footwork training in your private sessions? 

Joe Lewis: Footwork is the pinnacle in all sports. Many boxing coaches send their fighters to dance school for this purpose. In Okinawa and with Bruce Lee 90% of all my training was dedicated to footwork drills. You can only punch, kick or defend as fast as you can effectively move on your feet. Fast fighters, more importantly quick fighters are determined not by the fastest of their techniques, but by the quickness, the explosiveness and the emotional definition of their footwork. 

Which fighter of all time, do you respect the most, and why? 

Joe Lewis: Sugar Ray Robinson. He could fight inside or outside. He could in the trenches and fight the tough guys or he can get center ring and play with the fast technicians. He had 2 things: he hit hard and he had a hard chin. He had an incorrigible will to continue. He never yield/he never quit. He had incredible basics and his decision making skills were extremely quick. These are the traits of great fighters. These are the thing we all try to emulate. 

What was a typical workout session with Bruce like? 

Joe Lewis: He was strict about being on time. We went right to work, no warm up. He always had to show off his stomach muscles or forearms and sometimes a new kick he was working on. His kicks were a little weak back in 65-67. If you look at his movies, he has bad extension, his hands were out of position and he often over lunges. We would always work on fighting principles and /or tactics. Speed and quickness was a value that we both shared over everything else. We mostly worked on tactical sparring drills. Sometimes transition maneuvers, such as going from an offensive strike to a defensive posture. We studied fight films often. Most of what Bruce Lee did was copied from another source, he would then add his emotional energies and unique fight philosophy. Then I became his test tube and spy. I would go to tournaments and do Jeet Kune Do demo's. I would test his Jeet Kune Do against boxers and karate fighters in the ring and report back. What didn't work we threw away. Quite a bit was the old Wing Chun stuff, such as the trapping. For example when you get inside, don't cover, move or trap. Instead hit first, just as you would on the outside. I would go to different camps or schools snoop around, steal their stuff and go back to Bruce Lee and we'd analyze what was useful. That's the process of creation-you take something from here and there and come up with something new. That one of Bruce Lee's gifts - he was innovative and had the courage to be creative. He said the balls to say goodbye to the past. We call this breaking free. That's why I liked him, we both alike. 

I'm hoping you can elaborate more on your experiences with Bruce (as far as training with him). Can you give us a better understanding of just how good he was (as far as boxing & defense wise). Also, have you sparred with him regularly (or just once or twice, and was it based in his backyard)? 

Joe Lewis: I never sparred with Bruce Lee. We did limitation sparring drills. He had the speed and the power to be a world class boxer. I do not know what he did to prove he could do 10 or 12 rounds or what test he endured to show he could take a punch. Thirdly to make it in the fight game, no promoter is going to back unless he knows you have a strong will to continue at all costs. For example what would you do if you got 3 ribs broken. If you're a grappler, what would you do if your shoulder was dislocated. These questions need to be answered. Unfortunately in Bruce's case they never were. I never stood in front of another human who was a quick as him. He not only had the quickness but he had the inner confidence to muster the conviction to do so. I've seen others who had the speed but lack conviction, or vice versa. He was like Ali, he had both. I stood before both of these men, so I know.

How well would Bruce Lee have done in competition? Would he have been a tough opponent for you? 

Joe Lewis: Asking me about this or what he could have been is like asking how good an actor Tyson could be. ETD (Bruce Lee's film 'Enter the Dragon') remains the highest grossing in history. That's accolades to last 10 lifetimes. Don't make him more immortal than he was. He's the leading candidate for being the greatest martial artist of all time. That doesn't make you a fighter. If you want to fight then you fight some amateur fights, then somebody like Angelo Dundee will invite you to his camp. Being a martial artist doesn't automatically make you an actor, and vice versa. 

You don't seem to ride on the name "Jeet Kune Do". You once mentioned in a video tape that Bruce Lee's Jeet Kune Do is Jiddu Krishnamurti's philosophy from a philosophical point of view to an athletic point of view to a martial arts point of view. Can you describe more detailed what you meant? 

Joe Lewis: When Bruce Lee was attempting to add substance and intellectual essence to his art, he constantly quoted Krishnamurti (JK).He never used the name JK in front of me, but all you have to do is read a few of his (JK's) numerous books and you can easily detect not only similarities, but exact wordings. There's no harm in that. I do the same thing. He was trying to give Jeet Kune Do an intellectual stature or framework to separate it from other martial arts. What I'm saying is-you go into a typical karate school, they show you techniques. They know very little about the body, they know very little psychology, they know nothing about philosophy. Bruce Lee majored in philosophy, and he saw this need to include this higher learning in his program. 

As you sparred and trained with him - how was Bruce as a fighter and a martial artist - were his skills as good as it has been written? 

Joe Lewis: Were his skills as good as they've been written-NO. You must understand that people writing about somebody they didn't know makes it difficult to write with absolute truth. You're speaking from someone else's observations rather than first hand experience. Certain writers tend to embellish and sensationalize. 

His personal expression of Jeet Kune Do was difficult if not impossible to teach, as he mentioned in the early 70s to one of his earlier Wing Chun seniors that he wasn't happy with Jeet Kune Do because his students didn't pick it up very well. What did Bruce personally do, had it something to do with today's Jeet Kune Do? 

Joe Lewis: On his personal expression of Jeet Kune Do: He was constantly changing his definition of Jeet Kune Do.I used to go up in front of the audience after I'd won a tournament, and Bruce Lee had written out this little speech about Jeet Kune Do, and I could never get it right. I didn't have a clue on how to make sense on to understand what he had written for me to say. Simply put, the only definition I remember clearly is one day I went to his house and Bruce Lee said 'Ah! You know what Jeet Kune Do means? It means the `thusness' of the techniques. How do you like that?' Like I'm supposed to know what thusness means. I guess that's sort of a Zen quote.

On Bruce Lee 's personal Jeet Kune Do- What he did personally is a contradiction of what he taught. For example-he wouldn't give credit to his instructors, but he would demand credit for the knowledge he was giving you. He was taught not to teach the secrets that he'd learned, especially to Caucasians, yet he'd make a point teach us. He asked me not to teach anybody what he was showing me, but at the same time, he wanted me to practice what I was being taught. The only for me to practice is to show a sparring partner what I'm doing. I was supposed to go out and brag about Bruce Lee being my instructor to add stature to his name, but he never asked my permission to use my name, since I was a world champion before I met him, to enhance his credentials as an instructor. My point is there's a lot of double standards in Jeet Kune Do, and a lot of contradictions in Bruce Lee's practices. He would practice for example on a physical level going out to jog, just like a boxer. He would hit the heavy bag using the Jeet Kune Do punches) just as a boxer would and he would do the side kick and various other kicks against the heavy bag just as a karate person would. And he would work with a very loose double end bag, which I don't agree with, I think it should be tight. So in other words, he attempted to make Jeet Kune Do appear to be above the bar in terms of comparing it to other martial arts, but he seemingly practised the same things that other martial artists were doing. 

Did you ever take a side kick from Bruce and what was it like? 

Joe Lewis: No. But he did catch me with a punch. He hit real hard for his size. All the kicking and punching were staged, in other words posing to accommodate his incoming strike. It was never done beyond a pre-arranged, anticipated context. 

Could you tell us all what techniques and methods Bruce Lee and yourself learnt from each other?

Joe Lewis: If you look at Bruce Lee's stance in his movies, that's the same stance I brought over from Okinawa. That side straddle stance. Van Damme also used it in his movies. I'll take credit for that. Bruce Lee was not that interested in my techniques, and if he was he never openly commented on it. He would study my fight films behind my back and implement from that premise. He did that with everybody. He was more interested directly with my muscles-how I built certain muscles on my body. And of course every technique he showed me I had done in Okinawa- forward hand strike and the side kick. He showed me how to make them much better. 

There have been various interviews published in the past which stated that you never sparred with Bruce Lee. I was wondering then exactly what your workouts with him entailed. If you never touched his hands, then what was it that made him of interest to you? Some of articles recently reposted on this forum, talk about how you and he would watch boxing films and have discussions. Would you "work out" by yourself and Bruce would watch and make comments back to you? Were the workout sessions then you hitting the bag, shadow boxing etc. and Bruce giving you feedback or what? What I am trying to understand is what role Bruce Lee played in your training during the time you worked with him. Did you do a move against the bag or air, and then Bruce would do the same? Did you two never cross hands EVER? If so, then what made Bruce interesting for you? How did you decide he would have something to offer you over any other martial artist at the time? 

Joe Lewis: Any ambitious instructor, including myself, enjoys running into that gifted student. A person who maybe doesn't have skills, but tremendous talent. Talent means they have the psychological make up, the tenacious mental attributes, as well as the physical stature to become a great athlete in any field, not just fighting. I was that specimen. Any instructor would have smiled from ear to ear at me with my mind, my body, and my psychological preparation to have me walk into their school and say `Teach me how to fight'. So of course Bruce Lee was interested in me. He pursued me adamantly, I didn't pursue him. My reputation preceded me. And any of my sparring partners or anybody who witnessed my training habits, or stood toe to toe with me in any match can tell you what an awesome specimen I was to confront. Bruce Lee and I did touch hands. We did a lot of that chi-sao type drills. We did a lot of speed, timing, awareness, focusing and zen drills. What I'm talking about is standing toe to toe sometimes at `firing' range, sometime at what I call `fighting' range, which is a 3-4 inch difference between the two, and try to unload punches or kicks at each other, to try to gauge the others reaction speed. These are drills I still work with to day, and it made up the bulk of drills of what Bruce Lee and I worked on. *On what I saw in him: Mike Stone convinced me that Bruce Lee had something to offer. It's very difficult to influence me in any direction about any aspect of fighting or combat. I'm a hard sell, so before I went to Bruce Lee,I was pretty much in agreement with Stone on what he had told, and it was more than one conversation before I was convinced he had something to offer. 

Joe, which physical feat of Bruce's impressed you the most??? 2 finger push ups etc.? 

Joe Lewis: The 2 fingers push ups didn't impress me because he weighed 138 pounds when I was working with him. I used to do bodyguard for some Arabs, and one Iraqi bodyguard was over 200 pounds and he could do a one finger push up. What impressed me the most was that he took a 75 pound barbell, lifted it to his chest, from a standing position, and slowly extended it in front of him, elbows locked out, and held it for 15 seconds or more. Try that sometime and you'll understand why that's not only impressive, but extremely impressive. 

In an earlier post you mention K1 and Kyokushinkai as being some of the top fighters. That is certainly true in K1 fights, but what about NHB? Where does Brazilian Jujutsu, Sambo, Wrestling and Boxing come into it? It appears the top NHB fighters today train BJJ, Wrestling, Boxing and Muay Thai. And that they are not based in Karate at all. Have you been crosstraining in any groundfighting systems for submissions/Vale Tudo stuff? 

Joe Lewis: I started my training as a wrestler. I came into martial arts from the wrestling/weight lifting world. As a child I wanted to be a professional wrestler. That has always been my base. I have always been a better grappler than a kickboxer or karate fighter. I'm quick, strong, and I have hands that are like pliers. I love to grab, head butt and bite. Those are my 3 favorite maneuvers. I just don't talk about them publically. If you notice the mixed martial artists today and compare them with what the Gracie's started in `91,when they hand picked opponents, the grappling was working well until about `96. Once the Russians, Brazilians, and even Japanese guys started demonstrating that a `cut kick' to the leg, or a shin kick to the neck, or a straight right hand to the head were much quicker than a grappling finish hold, they started implementing them into competition. Now what you see in the last couple years in that everybody knows how to punch and kick to a degree. The punching in particular is starting to become the dominant technique. I agree that everybody should look into the possibility of being into mixed martial arts. It's really in this country that people seem to focus on one particular skill. Either solely nothing other the Judo TKD or karate, etc. In Okinawa all the karate black belts were black belts in Judo as teenagers-all of them. I like the fact that mixed martial arts became a dominant force in the `90's because it was a wake up call for these lazy instructors out there. 

Joe, did you really turn down the role of Colt in Way of the Dragon If so, do you regret it looking at the doors it opened for Chuck Norris? Also, how many films have you been in (as there are only 3 listed on the Internet Movie Database - see below), what do you think of them when you look back and are you still active in the film industry in some capacity? Zhan long (1988) ... aka Death Cage (1988) Force: Five (1981) Jaguar Lives! (1979) aka Felino, El (1979) (Spain) 

Joe Lewis: I don't have any regrets. Word got back to me that he wanted me to be in the film, and I sent word back that I wasn't interested in getting beat up on screen by him. He used to tell me his agenda when we were training about how he wanted to show the world that the Oriental was the superior fighter. He always used the term `by beating the Caucasian', and asked if I wanted to be in a movie with him. I said no then, as I did later on for way of the dragon. He then would laugh and say he'd get Chuck instead and how he'd enjoy beating the hell out of him. I had 5 lead roles. The 3 you mention, plus Mr. X, and The Cut Off. 

Joe.. what are your feelings after all these years of fighting and training of Bruce approaching opponents with his strong side forward?... I still fight that way most of the time even though my friend and Sensei for almost 10 years Bob Mauro, a champion kickboxer himself and trainer of 5 world champions, never felt the way Bruce did... 

Joe Lewis: I don't believe in this concept. I can knock out with either hand or foot. Power side forward implies one side is weak. Your lead side is for speed and to blind your foe. you can use it to locate the target as well. The military finds the target then annihilates it. The rear hand/leg are primary power weapons/if the power side really worked than why hasn't a top fighter or trainer endorsed this .Reason is if you practice these theories, you realize they don't work. You can't drop the atom without locating your target or preventing the foe from detecting your approach. So the rule of thumb is to locate, blind then you hit. Smart fighters can't be hit first. They're too quick and sharp. 

Can you tell us what were Bruce Lee's physical assets and liabilities? 

Joe Lewis: Physical assets: He had gifted quickness. There's a difference between quickness and fastness. He had very low fat body composition. He had thick shoulders, quick hands, and slim strong legs. And it appeared he had a good torso, that being the key to explosiveness in any athlete. He was coordinated. Moved very well on his feet, in particular his footwork. 

His liabilities: He had a long skinny neck, which is an indication a person can't take a punch, or a choke hold. His rib cage was very flat, which means a good liver shot on the right side of the body, or a good heart shot on the left side wouldn't be a lot of padding to guard against a concussion or damage to one of these arteries. If you look at his back between his shoulder blades, there's not a lot of thickness in the lower part of the trapezious muscles. This is an indication that he possibly couldn't hit as hard as people elude to. His bones were very thin. Typically people with small bones don't hit hard-a Sugar Ray Leonard physical type. These people tend to knock people out with a 2-3 punch combination, as opposed to a single strike knock out, which perhaps a Rocky Marciano or a Jack Dempsey would posses. Bruce Lee had real small ankles as well as small joints in the knees. I would imagine him to have some joint problems later in his life, especially if he did a lot of kicking on the heavy bag, or the round kicks against the banana bag to develop his shin bones. 

How did Bruce Lee's attempts at lateral movement differ from those of real world fighters? 

Joe Lewis: In my opinion Bruce Lee worked primarily on the vertical in and out motion. His penetration speed ,that's what we call going towards your opponent, and your clearing speed, which is pulling away from your opponent, as you disengage. He had great speed in both, but his lateral motion going side to side to disrupt an opponents sight alignment in my opinion was not perfected. He was a little stiff. Typically what you see people doing when they start doing the lateral motion is their shoulders and hips get too squared up, which makes them very accessible for an incoming strike. Also you notice in pictures of him and students like Danny Inosanto is that their hands are all over the place, meaning you want to maintain a strong defensive posture at all times. You want your elbows to remain in front of your hips and you want to keep your forward shoulder pointed towards your opponent so that your chin is behind that shoulder. Otherwise there's a good chance you're going to get hit. You'll also notice that Bruce Lee and certain martial artists doing ducking and slipping motions. When they duck down it means their knees are slightly collapsing, they're making their target shorter,(this is called giving your opponent at an angle).His elbows tend to separate, and when that happens you're wide open for a knee thrust or an uppercut. This is one of the weaknesses that you see in today's Jeet Kune Do practitioners. 

In your opinion, why are Bruce Lee fans so damned hypersensitive? 

Joe Lewis: Anytime an individual embraces an idol, whether it's a direct emotional attachment or a vicarious association, and probably the most coveted example I can give is the Christian's symbolic affection they have for Jesus Christ. Any time there's an implied attack on their idol, they take it personally. Most of these people, in my opinion have low self esteem, or lack a real strong inner sense of self assurance on a certain level. And their sensitivity is derived from the fact that it causes them to feel guilty. No one wants to feel guilty for something they lack. If you make someone aware of something they are not, it offends them, it angers them. The pain converts itself to anger and rage. And that's what they vent these hostilities. 

This Bruce Lee info is from the Oakland School sessions which Howard Williams, Bob Baker etc attended : - Key : Better to make miss an inch to a mile than to block. To block is to get hit. Don't engage opponent, disengage him. e.g. don't tangle yourself in blocking and trapping movements. The whole idea is to intercept his physical an emotional intent to hurt you. So even back then Bruce was against trapping but could still use the skill as a last resort. I needed to comment on that to make sure that everyone understands Bruce's way of teaching was not emphasized on trapping even though he was extremely skilled in the art. But if Bruce needed to trap he could do so. 

Joe Lewis: Honestly, and this might come as a shock to a lot of people-he thought it was a bunch of garbage. And he told me at one time that he was going to gradually phase it out of his system. He might do a single trap or like a little obstruction which you see certain pro boxers doing from time to time. This double and triple trapping stuff is nonsense. If you've got time to trap, you've got time to hit. When you get close enough to an opponent where you can trap, there are 3 things you don't do-1-You don't trap 2-you don't cover 3- you don't move-you hit first, then you trap, cover or move. I mentioned it before-on the outside or inside you want to practice getting off first. 

Being a real friend of Bruce Lee, what was your initial reaction on hearing that Bruce Lee had died and what are your gut feelings on the official verdict on his death? 

Joe Lewis: I was in St. Louis and wasn't really focused on Jeet Kune Do or martial arts at that time and the first thing I thought of was the kids being without a father. I suggest you watch George Tan's documentary, Death by Misadventure. It's the most thorough analysis I've seen. But regardless of how he died, the family is still without a father, a husband, still without a brother, still without a son.
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Joined: December 19th, 2017, 9:38 pm

July 1st, 2018, 2:18 pm #4

^ good post. I will add that having a quick temper and not liking to be touched (Dan Inosanto interview), BL would not have done well in BJJ and hands on grappling as he would likely not be able to handle 'tapping out'. Though he did use 'grappling' moves they were in the mode of a collection of tricks (JJJ) not the flow and rolling of BJJ. Many high belt players go to a BJJ class and soon drop out because they can't handle the ego challenge of being submitted. In BJJ you have to be submitted and learn to tap out thousands of time in the path to mastery.

Good insight by Joe Lewis on BL's weaknesses, liver shot, untested chin. In a real sudden start confrontation BL would have done well. But in a long drawn out fight with rules he may have had problems, not being able to use his finger jab, perhaps.
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 9:14 pm

July 1st, 2018, 9:01 pm #5

[quote="pathfinder73"]
Yes it's true. His first wife Susan said Bruce made a pass at her when she was cutting his hair and Lewis went round to Bruce's house. Bruce told Linda to come and listen to this and Joe left. Linda didn't separate them as there was a door screen separating them.
[/quote]

According to Polly's revelations in his new book, Bruce was all over the place with women... Surprisingly, the "Legend of Bruce Lee TV series" appears to show MORE of his true characteristics than any of the bio films, with one exception: they downplayed his love of play with the ladies (probably at the behest of The Estate), and that is the one missing element that eliminates actual believability. For someone so driven, OCD, and such, philandering would be somewhat the obvious outlet, for it's a definitive way to burn excessive energies.
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Joined: June 29th, 2018, 1:55 am

July 1st, 2018, 11:35 pm #6

[quote="dragonb"]
[quote="pathfinder73"]
Yes it's true. His first wife Susan said Bruce made a pass at her when she was cutting his hair and Lewis went round to Bruce's house. Bruce told Linda to come and listen to this and Joe left. Linda didn't separate them as there was a door screen separating them.
[/quote]

According to Polly's revelations in his new book, Bruce was all over the place with women... Surprisingly, the "Legend of Bruce Lee TV series" appears to show MORE of his true characteristics than any of the bio films, with one exception: they downplayed his love of play with the ladies (probably at the behest of The Estate), and that is the one missing element that eliminates actual believability. For someone so driven, OCD, and such, philandering would be somewhat the obvious outlet, for it's a definitive way to burn excessive energies.
[/quote]

This is just sensationalism, unfortunately people need it to sell their books. BL was not a saint and actually had an affair with Betty but all this history that BL but all this history that BL was with women all the time is a big lie made for sale of books. The truth is that BL did not have time to get behind women, he was always very busy with training and filming and, moreover, BL was an introspective and timid person , he was not the kind of guy who's been looking for women all the time, that's why I did not buy this book and I'm never going to buy it.
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Joined: January 17th, 2014, 1:19 am

July 2nd, 2018, 1:56 am #7

[quote="Kojiro"]


This is just sensationalism, unfortunately people need it to sell their books. BL was not a saint and actually had an affair with Betty but all this history that BL but all this history that BL was with women all the time is a big lie made for sale of books. The truth is that BL did not have time to get behind women, he was always very busy with training and filming and, moreover, BL was an introspective and timid person , he was not the kind of guy who's been looking for women all the time, that's why I did not buy this book and I'm never going to buy it.
[/quote]
Bruce Lee was a womanizer. People can't and should not be in denial about realities any longer. Bruce Lee did indeed have time to get behind women, the front of women, the side of women, he loved it all!
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 9:14 pm

July 2nd, 2018, 3:03 am #8

[quote="Kojiro"]
[quote="dragonb"]
[quote="pathfinder73"]
Yes it's true. His first wife Susan said Bruce made a pass at her when she was cutting his hair and Lewis went round to Bruce's house. Bruce told Linda to come and listen to this and Joe left. Linda didn't separate them as there was a door screen separating them.
[/quote]

According to Polly's revelations in his new book, Bruce was all over the place with women... Surprisingly, the "Legend of Bruce Lee TV series" appears to show MORE of his true characteristics than any of the bio films, with one exception: they downplayed his love of play with the ladies (probably at the behest of The Estate), and that is the one missing element that eliminates actual believability. For someone so driven, OCD, and such, philandering would be somewhat the obvious outlet, for it's a definitive way to burn excessive energies.
[/quote]

This is just sensationalism, unfortunately people need it to sell their books. BL was not a saint and actually had an affair with Betty but all this history that BL but all this history that BL was with women all the time is a big lie made for sale of books. The truth is that BL did not have time to get behind women, he was always very busy with training and filming and, moreover, BL was an introspective and timid person , he was not the kind of guy who's been looking for women all the time, that's why I did not buy this book and I'm never going to buy it.
[/quote]

@ Kojiro: BWAAAHAAAAHH!!!!!! GTEFHOOHWTBS!
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Joined: June 29th, 2018, 1:55 am

July 2nd, 2018, 3:36 am #9

http://www.bruceleeonline.com/bob-wall-interview/

JB: (laughs) Next hogwash is…. did Bruce ever cheat on his wife , you know, did he ever have any sexual affairs with any of his leading actresses? This is just stuff I’m reading from the book to you.

Bob Wall : Well there’s a lot of rumors about that stuff. I was never with Bruce when he was with any girl but I can tell you I was around Betty Ting Pei, Nora Miao, and there was none of that stuff going on around us, but all I can tell you is …..he loooved his wife. Linda Lee , for my money, was one of the best wives I’ve ever seen in my life. She was a fabulous wife to Bruce. I had several onversations with him about how much he loved her and he would never do anything to risk losing her and the fact is that woman loved him, still I think she loves him, beyond the grave. She married another Bruce. Her current husband is Bruce (Cadwell). But the reality is she’s a classy bright woman, who took great care of him , was very sexual with him was very womanly with him
and she was probably more fluent in Cantonese than Bruce was. She really took it seriously about being his wife. I can’t imagine… look, you know what, when you’re an actor like Bruce and you have a million women attracted to him and you’re taking pictures with actresses all the time, so it’s very easy…..I don’t know if you remember in high school you know like it was once thought that anyone wearing a yellow sweater was a hooker so if you saw ‘Mary’ wearing a yellow sweater she’s a hooker…so the reality is that on the sets Bruce was very friendly to everyone , he was a charming guy and I can’t say for sure because I don’t know but I can tell you my opinion is no.

Bob Wall really knew Bruce Lee, he was not a mercenary, he did not receive money to destroy the reputation of other people.
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 9:14 pm

July 2nd, 2018, 3:03 pm #10

[quote="Kojiro"]
http://www.bruceleeonline.com/bob-wall-interview/

JB: (laughs) Next hogwash is…. did Bruce ever cheat on his wife , you know, did he ever have any sexual affairs with any of his leading actresses? This is just stuff I’m reading from the book to you.

Bob Wall : Well there’s a lot of rumors about that stuff. I was never with Bruce when he was with any girl but I can tell you I was around Betty Ting Pei, Nora Miao, and there was none of that stuff going on around us, but all I can tell you is …..he loooved his wife. Linda Lee , for my money, was one of the best wives I’ve ever seen in my life. She was a fabulous wife to Bruce. I had several onversations with him about how much he loved her and he would never do anything to risk losing her and the fact is that woman loved him, still I think she loves him, beyond the grave. She married another Bruce. Her current husband is Bruce (Cadwell). But the reality is she’s a classy bright woman, who took great care of him , was very sexual with him was very womanly with him
and she was probably more fluent in Cantonese than Bruce was. She really took it seriously about being his wife. I can’t imagine… look, you know what, when you’re an actor like Bruce and you have a million women attracted to him and you’re taking pictures with actresses all the time, so it’s very easy…..I don’t know if you remember in high school you know like it was once thought that anyone wearing a yellow sweater was a hooker so if you saw ‘Mary’ wearing a yellow sweater she’s a hooker…so the reality is that on the sets Bruce was very friendly to everyone , he was a charming guy and I can’t say for sure because I don’t know but I can tell you my opinion is no.

Bob Wall really knew Bruce Lee, he was not a mercenary, he did not receive money to destroy the reputation of other people.
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Bob Wall changes stories like a regular person changes socks... There was a time when he was belittling and condescending toward Bruce and his accomplishments, and I do believe a bit of bigotry was at the root... He has softened his position over the years, but I still look at him sideways when he speaks of how "great" their friendship was. False. Bruce and CHUCK were friends; he and Wall were associates, thru Chuck. Lee never intended Wall to be in Way of The Dragon. It happened because he 'partnered' himself to Norris' trip to Rome & HK to film. That's the type dude he is.
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