The Big Dragon Who Influenced The Little Dragon

LJF
Joined: December 6th, 2014, 3:05 am

September 17th, 2016, 7:49 am #1

The Big Dragon With The Magic Fist
===========================
In 1943, at a young age of 15, he defeated famous Russian boxer, Marceau Love in open match in Shanghai and 3 years later, he beat world heavyweight champion "Black Lion" Luther, an African American in another open match in Shanghai again. He won both fights by knock outs. There were photos and reports on these fights in the old Shanghai newspaper. He was a real Chinese martial arts master who actually fought and won public matches against Western fighters. His nickname was “Big Dragon” and after he won the matches, the media called him “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists.” This Big Dragon was Master Cai Longyun (aka Choy Loong-Wan), whose Chinese name literally means dragon flying over the clouds.

Influence over Bruce Lee
===================
Master Cai Longyun had contributed a lot to the martial arts world and influenced many martial arts practitioners globally. One of them was the legendary Bruce Lee. In Bruce’s first and only published martial arts book, “Chinese Gung Fu – The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense,” published in 1963, there were many leg training methods being borrowed from Master Cai’s Wushu (martial arts) book, called “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise.” There was almost an entire chapter on stretching and kicks, including illustrations, adapted from Master Cai’s own material. In addition, Bruce’s other scholarly materials, such as “Tao of Gung Fu,” which were published posthumously, there was even direct mentions of Hwa Kuen, and included pictures of Master Cai in his scrapbook. This proved that Master Cai’s knowledge, and by extension martial art’s foundation has far-reaching influences, and has validity in popular martial arts.

There were many illustrations drawn by Bruce in “Chinese Gung Fu” and many of them were based on Master Cai’s Wushu’s manuals. This showed Bruce had regards of Master Cai’s knowledge and skills, and many of the techniques seem practical as Bruce would cross reference and treated them as a guide in his Gung Fu’s exploration in the early 60s.

According to “Wen Hui Paper,” Master Cai said he felt proud that Bruce had brought honor to the Chinese martial arts and Kung Fu movies. Though someone ever told him that Bruce admired him and had kept Master Cai’s book “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise” under the pillow, Master Cai never dare to speak about it for fear of people thinking that he was boasting. It was until he saw someone from “Bruce Lee’s Research Society” who provided evidence to support the above claims that he finally believed it was true.

Bruce’s “Three un-landed Whirlwind Legs” In ’64 Karate Tournament/ ’73 ETD Scene
===============================================================
Bruce was an avid reader and had more than 25,000 books in his personal library. Besides “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise,” he also collected Master Cai’s “Hwa Kuen.” Bruce self-learnt the techniques and exercises from these books. He also paid much attention to the training of his waist and hips, which allowed him to use his kicks flexibly just like his punch.

In his Long Beach Tournament Demo in 1964 and In the movie ETD, Bruce performed a special movement called, “Three un-landed Whirlwind Legs” --- the three consecutive steps which were completed above the ground followed by the Whirlwind kicks. These movements were actually originated from Master Cai’s “Hwa Kuen’s” Three un-landed steps but Bruce modified part of the movements to make it more fanciful. This clears the doubts that Bruce learnt this technique from WJM’s Bak Sil Lum footage. It was Hwa Kuen that he actually learnt it from Master Cai’s Kung Fu manual. In addition, Bruce revised and incorporated Kung Lik Kuen’s (he learnt from Siu Hon-Sung) jumping moves into this Whirlwind kick.

Tao of Kung Fu
============
On June, 2010, Master Cai was requested to write forewords for Bruce’s Chinese edition “Tao of Gung Fu.” He wrote, “Though I and Bruce had never met each other but through the affinity of martial arts, we had borne a deep relationship….”

It was such a coincidence that both Master Cai and Bruce were born on the same month and same day, i.e. Master Cai’s birthday was on 27 Nov 1928 and Bruce’s birthday was on 27 Nov 1940. Both were born in the year of the dragon and the only difference was the 12 years gap between them. Master Cai was known as the “Big Dragon” while Bruce was the “Little Dragon.” “Maybe this is the special affinity between both of us,” Master Cai said.

Master Cai’s Comments on Bruce’s Kung Fu
=================================
Master Cai spoke to some friends (note: probably Jesse Glover, Dan Lee who had visited mainland China before their passing) of Bruce and got to know that Bruce actually saw Master Cai as a learning model in martial arts. They said Bruce was an idol of many martial arts fans and Bruce himself looked upon Master Cai as his Kung Fu idol, probably due to his highly skilled martial arts and his feats over the Western fighters in the 1940s. They also told him that Bruce was very diligent in practicing Kung Fu and had studied many martial arts manuals. His two books “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise” and “First Routine of Hwa Kuen” were two favorites of Bruce who read it very often during the early 60s. As mentioned above, the first manual is used as a blueprint for Bruce’s first and only martial arts book, “Chinese Gung Fu – The philosophical Arts of Self-Defense.”

As to some rumor that said Bruce did not understand Chinese martial arts, Master Cai denied that. From what he understood, Bruce learnt at least 8 types of traditional Chinese martial arts. Master Cai said, “Bruce first learnt Wu Style’s Tai Chi from his father, then Wing Chun from Ip Man, followed by Yi Chuan from the student of Grandmaster Wong Hong-Joi. He also learnt Jit Kuen, Kung Lik Kuen and Bang Bo Kuen (Praying Mantis) from Siu Hon-Sung. Furthermore, he had picked up Hung Gar and Choy Li Fut from other masters. He also self-learnt “Lo Han Hsin Yi Chuan” from the video demo of a Shaolin monk. Of course, Bruce also self-learnt my famous Hwa Kuen.”

Master Cai continued, “In the early 60s, mainland China published a huge volumes of martial arts books (mostly northern styles). These quality martial arts books have very clear text and scientific systems as well as simple approaches. For those with very good martial arts foundation, they can simply self-learn these skills through the books.” Bruce bought a lot of these martial arts books from HK, and the bookstores in Chinatown of the U.S. and Canada etc. One thing to note is that, Bruce diligently trained his basics from Master Cai’s book, “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise.” This was one of the reasons why Bruce could use his waist and legs very flexibly and could kick just liked his punch.

Bruce should be thankful to Master Cai for influencing his journey of Gung Fu learning in the early years. Master Cai had contributed a lot to the martial arts world with his many publications, teachings and therefore impacted many generations of martial arts practitioners, especially those in Chinese Wushu. Master Cai had passed away in Shanghai, at the age of 87, on December 19th, 2015. R.I.P.


Photos of Master Cai Longyun: https://postimg.org/image/d0xj5v3hz/


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LJF
Joined: December 6th, 2014, 3:05 am

September 17th, 2016, 7:52 am #2

Master of Hwa Kuen (aka Wah Fist)
==========================
Master Cai Longyun (aka Choy Loong-Wan) was a famous Chinese martial artist who specialized in Hwa Kuen, Shaolin Kung Fu, Tai Chi Chuan and Hsin-Yi Chuan. Being the vice chairman of the Chinese Wushu Association, he was also an associate professor at the Shanghai Sports Academy. When China implemented its first belt system for Wushu in 1998, he was one of the only three individuals nationwide, who was first awarded the ninth or highest degree which is similar to the formal dan ranking systems of the Japanese and Korean martial arts system.

Master Cai Longyun was born on 27 November 1928 in Shanghai. Most of his ancestors were mainly Kung Fu masters in Jining city, Shandong province. Master Cai was the son of the famous martial artist, Cai Guiqin (aka Choy Kuei-Kan) who was an undefeated fighter in Shandong. His lightning fists won him the nickname of "Fist Demon". He was also proficient in long and short weapons. As a notorious martial artist, he would influence his son –Cai Longyun greatly. Master Cai studied martial arts at a very young age of 4 and endured very strict training under his father.

He frequently performed exercises at least a hundred times at once, and stayed in stances for half an hour at a time. When Master Cai was nine, he was already skilled in several styles of martial arts, including Shaolin Lo Han Kuen (Arhat Fist) and Shaolin Fong Mo Staff (Shaolin Crazed Demon Staff) etc. Later, Master Cai traveled to Shanghai, where he learned various styles of Shaolin Kung Fu, Hsing-Yi Kuen, and Ba Guat Palm (Eight Trigrams Palm). His specialty was Hwa Kuen, the style practiced by his family for generations. He was gifted in martial arts and was proficient in various styles by a very young age.

Defeats Over the Foreign Fighters
============================
Between 1900s-1940s, China was in turmoil as a result of foreign invasions and many of its provinces and cities were being colonized by foreign powers. The Chinese were then called the "Sick Men of Asia." Many foreigners look down on the Chinese and their martial arts. Also, many Western boxers challenged Chinese martial artists to fights. In December 1943, the foreigners in the colony of Shanghai initiated an official competition between foreign fighters and Chinese martial artists. This challenge infuriated the entire martial arts circle in Shanghai. Then, a team of 8 Chinese fighters, including renowned masters like Wang Ziping and Cai Guiqin, were assembled to fight the challengers.

Amongst the Chinese fighters picked, the youngest was Master Cai, who was only fifteen at the time. His father was initially concerned that he was too young to participate but was eventually convinced by his son’s determination. On 13 December 1943, the day of the fight, the sports stadium where the matches were held was full of spectators. Master Cai's opponent was a huge 25-year-old internationally-renowned Russian fighter named Marceau Love. Many doubted that young Master Cai could stand up to his opponent, who was both older and larger in built. However, young Master Cai used his Shaolin Kung Fu and Hwa Kuen and taking advantage of his opponent's clumsiness, knocked down his opponent 13 times in just two and a half rounds, or less than 5 minutes. Towards the end of the third round, the Russian threw a sudden punch with all his remaining strength, at young Master Cai's forehead. Master Cai ducked and threw a kick at his opponent's abdomen and knocked him out. The Chinese martial arts team won the competition with 5 wins, 2 losses, and 1 tie. After the fight, the press addressed him as "The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists".

Later, his Russian opponent claimed that the fight was not fair since Western boxing does not allow the use of legs (although this was not one of the rules under which they fought as both parties had accepted the conditions before the match). He challenged young Master Cai to another fight but with the restriction of using the legs (sounds familiar like the movie Ip Man II but this is real incident). Master Cai coolly accepted the challenge and defeated him once more. Three years later, i.e. 1946, the same group of people set up another fight between Master Cai and the world heavyweight champion "Black Lion" Luther. Master Cai had been diligently practicing throughout the course of the three years, and had improved tremendously in his martial arts skills. Being a more experienced and matured 18 years old young man, he again used Shaolin kung fu and Hwa Kuen, but only the fist movements of the styles, to k.o. his opponent. “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists” was on the headline of all newspaper the following day.

Scholarly Warrior
==============
Unlike many martial artists who were not educated, Master Cai went to college, and was a well-educated martial arts practitioner or scholarly warrior. The combination of traditional Chinese Wushu (martial arts) mastery, knowledge and fighting experience made Master Cai an exceptional master of Wushu. In 1953, Master Cai represented Northeast China in a national sports competition, and won gold with his Hwa Kuen, Emei Saber, and Hwa Kuen’s simulated combat. In 1954 he joined the China National Wushu team, and later became the head of the team. From 1957 to 1960, he and many other researchers helped to organized the complex Wushu materials, and later established the first set of rules for modern Chinese Wushu competitions. Furthermore, Master Cai also wrote books on the use of various types of weapons, as well as did research on the martial arts of various regions in China. In 1960, he became the head of the Wushu teaching and research section of the Shanghai Sports Academy. In 1978, he became an associate professor there. Master Cai was invited to be the judge in numerous Wushu competitions. Being a prominent figure in mainland China, his books include “Hwa Kuen,” “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise,” “Swordsmanship,” “Shaolin Fong Mo Staff,” “Drunken Fist” etc. were all well received by martial arts lovers over the globe.

The Evolver & Godfather of Wushu
===========================
Master Cai was in fact, one of the most significant contributors behind the standardization and evolution of modern Chinese Wushu. As both a traditional Wushu master and architect of modern Wushu, Master Cai defended the existence of modern Wushu against its illogical criticisms. Modern Wushu has been criticized by traditional Wushu practitioners, dubbed “traditionalists”, for simplifying and watering down traditional Chinese martial arts for standardization in competition, being too commercialized for sport purposes, and for separating the skill sets of forms work and sparring into separate specializations for athletes. But Master Cai justified by reasoning, “If we don’t promote competition Wushu, then that would be bad…Part of what makes traditional martial arts so special is that there are so many variations and styles. But this can hurt competition Wushu and the chance for Wushu to become a world sport.”

Master Cai’s knowledge and understanding of Wushu also provides insight into Wushu’s direct application in fighting. His fighting experience attests to that. Firstly, he explains that forms and fighting are two different skill sets. “When you execute a straight punch in forms, you must also have a good bow stance. But in combat, you cannot wait to get into a good bow stance and then punch. You just punch. You have no time to set up perfect footwork.” He also said, “Even in my early days of training, when we spoke about routine practice and fighting training, both were clearly defined as separate entities.” However, he, as with other Wushu masters, also suggested how to make modern Wushu a legitimate modern martial arts system and not just a simple sport. “Some people know form. Some people only know San-Da (Chinese Free Combat). Surely, it is ideal if you know both, but from the competition point of view, you only choose one.”

As previously established, Master Cai was famous for winning public matches against Western fighters. Thus, he has legitimately proven himself outside of his Wushu system, something that is rare in the martial arts world, especially in the Wushu community. He is someone who was worthy of representing Wushu in a complete sense physically, martially and intellectually, not just in the sports and competition sense. There are very few modern Wushu athletes that could adequately represent Wushu in a complete sense, and they are not the Wushu champions and athletes that people normally would think of today. However, there are plenty of Wushu masters that could more than represent Wushu in all of these aspects, and Master Cai, who could be dubbed as “The Godfather of Wushu” was definitely on that list.


Kung Fu Magazine's article “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists”:

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/ ... rticle=625

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Joined: May 6th, 2016, 3:35 am

September 17th, 2016, 1:40 pm #3

The Big Dragon With The Magic Fist
===========================
In 1943, at a young age of 15, he defeated famous Russian boxer, Marceau Love in open match in Shanghai and 3 years later, he beat world heavyweight champion "Black Lion" Luther, an African American in another open match in Shanghai again. He won both fights by knock outs. There were photos and reports on these fights in the old Shanghai newspaper. He was a real Chinese martial arts master who actually fought and won public matches against Western fighters. His nickname was “Big Dragon” and after he won the matches, the media called him “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists.” This Big Dragon was Master Cai Longyun (aka Choy Loong-Wan), whose Chinese name literally means dragon flying over the clouds.

Influence over Bruce Lee
===================
Master Cai Longyun had contributed a lot to the martial arts world and influenced many martial arts practitioners globally. One of them was the legendary Bruce Lee. In Bruce’s first and only published martial arts book, “Chinese Gung Fu – The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense,” published in 1963, there were many leg training methods being borrowed from Master Cai’s Wushu (martial arts) book, called “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise.” There was almost an entire chapter on stretching and kicks, including illustrations, adapted from Master Cai’s own material. In addition, Bruce’s other scholarly materials, such as “Tao of Gung Fu,” which were published posthumously, there was even direct mentions of Hwa Kuen, and included pictures of Master Cai in his scrapbook. This proved that Master Cai’s knowledge, and by extension martial art’s foundation has far-reaching influences, and has validity in popular martial arts.

There were many illustrations drawn by Bruce in “Chinese Gung Fu” and many of them were based on Master Cai’s Wushu’s manuals. This showed Bruce had regards of Master Cai’s knowledge and skills, and many of the techniques seem practical as Bruce would cross reference and treated them as a guide in his Gung Fu’s exploration in the early 60s.

According to “Wen Hui Paper,” Master Cai said he felt proud that Bruce had brought honor to the Chinese martial arts and Kung Fu movies. Though someone ever told him that Bruce admired him and had kept Master Cai’s book “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise” under the pillow, Master Cai never dare to speak about it for fear of people thinking that he was boasting. It was until he saw someone from “Bruce Lee’s Research Society” who provided evidence to support the above claims that he finally believed it was true.

Bruce’s “Three un-landed Whirlwind Legs” In ’64 Karate Tournament/ ’73 ETD Scene
===============================================================
Bruce was an avid reader and had more than 25,000 books in his personal library. Besides “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise,” he also collected Master Cai’s “Hwa Kuen.” Bruce self-learnt the techniques and exercises from these books. He also paid much attention to the training of his waist and hips, which allowed him to use his kicks flexibly just like his punch.

In his Long Beach Tournament Demo in 1964 and In the movie ETD, Bruce performed a special movement called, “Three un-landed Whirlwind Legs” --- the three consecutive steps which were completed above the ground followed by the Whirlwind kicks. These movements were actually originated from Master Cai’s “Hwa Kuen’s” Three un-landed steps but Bruce modified part of the movements to make it more fanciful. This clears the doubts that Bruce learnt this technique from WJM’s Bak Sil Lum footage. It was Hwa Kuen that he actually learnt it from Master Cai’s Kung Fu manual. In addition, Bruce revised and incorporated Kung Lik Kuen’s (he learnt from Siu Hon-Sung) jumping moves into this Whirlwind kick.

Tao of Kung Fu
============
On June, 2010, Master Cai was requested to write forewords for Bruce’s Chinese edition “Tao of Gung Fu.” He wrote, “Though I and Bruce had never met each other but through the affinity of martial arts, we had borne a deep relationship….”

It was such a coincidence that both Master Cai and Bruce were born on the same month and same day, i.e. Master Cai’s birthday was on 27 Nov 1928 and Bruce’s birthday was on 27 Nov 1940. Both were born in the year of the dragon and the only difference was the 12 years gap between them. Master Cai was known as the “Big Dragon” while Bruce was the “Little Dragon.” “Maybe this is the special affinity between both of us,” Master Cai said.

Master Cai’s Comments on Bruce’s Kung Fu
=================================
Master Cai spoke to some friends (note: probably Jesse Glover, Dan Lee who had visited mainland China before their passing) of Bruce and got to know that Bruce actually saw Master Cai as a learning model in martial arts. They said Bruce was an idol of many martial arts fans and Bruce himself looked upon Master Cai as his Kung Fu idol, probably due to his highly skilled martial arts and his feats over the Western fighters in the 1940s. They also told him that Bruce was very diligent in practicing Kung Fu and had studied many martial arts manuals. His two books “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise” and “First Routine of Hwa Kuen” were two favorites of Bruce who read it very often during the early 60s. As mentioned above, the first manual is used as a blueprint for Bruce’s first and only martial arts book, “Chinese Gung Fu – The philosophical Arts of Self-Defense.”

As to some rumor that said Bruce did not understand Chinese martial arts, Master Cai denied that. From what he understood, Bruce learnt at least 8 types of traditional Chinese martial arts. Master Cai said, “Bruce first learnt Wu Style’s Tai Chi from his father, then Wing Chun from Ip Man, followed by Yi Chuan from the student of Grandmaster Wong Hong-Joi. He also learnt Jit Kuen, Kung Lik Kuen and Bang Bo Kuen (Praying Mantis) from Siu Hon-Sung. Furthermore, he had picked up Hung Gar and Choy Li Fut from other masters. He also self-learnt “Lo Han Hsin Yi Chuan” from the video demo of a Shaolin monk. Of course, Bruce also self-learnt my famous Hwa Kuen.”

Master Cai continued, “In the early 60s, mainland China published a huge volumes of martial arts books (mostly northern styles). These quality martial arts books have very clear text and scientific systems as well as simple approaches. For those with very good martial arts foundation, they can simply self-learn these skills through the books.” Bruce bought a lot of these martial arts books from HK, and the bookstores in Chinatown of the U.S. and Canada etc. One thing to note is that, Bruce diligently trained his basics from Master Cai’s book, “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise.” This was one of the reasons why Bruce could use his waist and legs very flexibly and could kick just liked his punch.

Bruce should be thankful to Master Cai for influencing his journey of Gung Fu learning in the early years. Master Cai had contributed a lot to the martial arts world with his many publications, teachings and therefore impacted many generations of martial arts practitioners, especially those in Chinese Wushu. Master Cai had passed away in Shanghai, at the age of 87, on December 19th, 2015. R.I.P.


Photos of Master Cai Longyun: https://postimg.org/image/d0xj5v3hz/

Great info.

So, Lee learned that kicks from Master Cai's Hwa Kuen. This should stop the rumor that Lee learned Northern Shaolin from WJM's footage. Totally outrageous! WJM's camp really came up with many stories just to make Lee looked bad and liked a loser.

Thanks for the proof, LJF!
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Jason
Jason

September 17th, 2016, 2:56 pm #4

Agreed. Bruce learned Northern Kung Fu in late 50s not in mid 60s as WJM's camp claimed.
Also, he didn't give up Wing Chun straight away after his fight with WJM in late 64. He returned to HK in 65 and tried to learn some more Wing Chun from Ip Man as well as other Kung Fu from Siu Hon San etc. Bruce only changed his style in late 66 or early 67.
Bruce is dead, people who tried to defamed him are easy but truth will always prevail ultimately.
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Joined: September 19th, 2015, 12:07 pm

September 17th, 2016, 4:28 pm #5

Master of Hwa Kuen (aka Wah Fist)
==========================
Master Cai Longyun (aka Choy Loong-Wan) was a famous Chinese martial artist who specialized in Hwa Kuen, Shaolin Kung Fu, Tai Chi Chuan and Hsin-Yi Chuan. Being the vice chairman of the Chinese Wushu Association, he was also an associate professor at the Shanghai Sports Academy. When China implemented its first belt system for Wushu in 1998, he was one of the only three individuals nationwide, who was first awarded the ninth or highest degree which is similar to the formal dan ranking systems of the Japanese and Korean martial arts system.

Master Cai Longyun was born on 27 November 1928 in Shanghai. Most of his ancestors were mainly Kung Fu masters in Jining city, Shandong province. Master Cai was the son of the famous martial artist, Cai Guiqin (aka Choy Kuei-Kan) who was an undefeated fighter in Shandong. His lightning fists won him the nickname of "Fist Demon". He was also proficient in long and short weapons. As a notorious martial artist, he would influence his son –Cai Longyun greatly. Master Cai studied martial arts at a very young age of 4 and endured very strict training under his father.

He frequently performed exercises at least a hundred times at once, and stayed in stances for half an hour at a time. When Master Cai was nine, he was already skilled in several styles of martial arts, including Shaolin Lo Han Kuen (Arhat Fist) and Shaolin Fong Mo Staff (Shaolin Crazed Demon Staff) etc. Later, Master Cai traveled to Shanghai, where he learned various styles of Shaolin Kung Fu, Hsing-Yi Kuen, and Ba Guat Palm (Eight Trigrams Palm). His specialty was Hwa Kuen, the style practiced by his family for generations. He was gifted in martial arts and was proficient in various styles by a very young age.

Defeats Over the Foreign Fighters
============================
Between 1900s-1940s, China was in turmoil as a result of foreign invasions and many of its provinces and cities were being colonized by foreign powers. The Chinese were then called the "Sick Men of Asia." Many foreigners look down on the Chinese and their martial arts. Also, many Western boxers challenged Chinese martial artists to fights. In December 1943, the foreigners in the colony of Shanghai initiated an official competition between foreign fighters and Chinese martial artists. This challenge infuriated the entire martial arts circle in Shanghai. Then, a team of 8 Chinese fighters, including renowned masters like Wang Ziping and Cai Guiqin, were assembled to fight the challengers.

Amongst the Chinese fighters picked, the youngest was Master Cai, who was only fifteen at the time. His father was initially concerned that he was too young to participate but was eventually convinced by his son’s determination. On 13 December 1943, the day of the fight, the sports stadium where the matches were held was full of spectators. Master Cai's opponent was a huge 25-year-old internationally-renowned Russian fighter named Marceau Love. Many doubted that young Master Cai could stand up to his opponent, who was both older and larger in built. However, young Master Cai used his Shaolin Kung Fu and Hwa Kuen and taking advantage of his opponent's clumsiness, knocked down his opponent 13 times in just two and a half rounds, or less than 5 minutes. Towards the end of the third round, the Russian threw a sudden punch with all his remaining strength, at young Master Cai's forehead. Master Cai ducked and threw a kick at his opponent's abdomen and knocked him out. The Chinese martial arts team won the competition with 5 wins, 2 losses, and 1 tie. After the fight, the press addressed him as "The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists".

Later, his Russian opponent claimed that the fight was not fair since Western boxing does not allow the use of legs (although this was not one of the rules under which they fought as both parties had accepted the conditions before the match). He challenged young Master Cai to another fight but with the restriction of using the legs (sounds familiar like the movie Ip Man II but this is real incident). Master Cai coolly accepted the challenge and defeated him once more. Three years later, i.e. 1946, the same group of people set up another fight between Master Cai and the world heavyweight champion "Black Lion" Luther. Master Cai had been diligently practicing throughout the course of the three years, and had improved tremendously in his martial arts skills. Being a more experienced and matured 18 years old young man, he again used Shaolin kung fu and Hwa Kuen, but only the fist movements of the styles, to k.o. his opponent. “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists” was on the headline of all newspaper the following day.

Scholarly Warrior
==============
Unlike many martial artists who were not educated, Master Cai went to college, and was a well-educated martial arts practitioner or scholarly warrior. The combination of traditional Chinese Wushu (martial arts) mastery, knowledge and fighting experience made Master Cai an exceptional master of Wushu. In 1953, Master Cai represented Northeast China in a national sports competition, and won gold with his Hwa Kuen, Emei Saber, and Hwa Kuen’s simulated combat. In 1954 he joined the China National Wushu team, and later became the head of the team. From 1957 to 1960, he and many other researchers helped to organized the complex Wushu materials, and later established the first set of rules for modern Chinese Wushu competitions. Furthermore, Master Cai also wrote books on the use of various types of weapons, as well as did research on the martial arts of various regions in China. In 1960, he became the head of the Wushu teaching and research section of the Shanghai Sports Academy. In 1978, he became an associate professor there. Master Cai was invited to be the judge in numerous Wushu competitions. Being a prominent figure in mainland China, his books include “Hwa Kuen,” “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise,” “Swordsmanship,” “Shaolin Fong Mo Staff,” “Drunken Fist” etc. were all well received by martial arts lovers over the globe.

The Evolver & Godfather of Wushu
===========================
Master Cai was in fact, one of the most significant contributors behind the standardization and evolution of modern Chinese Wushu. As both a traditional Wushu master and architect of modern Wushu, Master Cai defended the existence of modern Wushu against its illogical criticisms. Modern Wushu has been criticized by traditional Wushu practitioners, dubbed “traditionalists”, for simplifying and watering down traditional Chinese martial arts for standardization in competition, being too commercialized for sport purposes, and for separating the skill sets of forms work and sparring into separate specializations for athletes. But Master Cai justified by reasoning, “If we don’t promote competition Wushu, then that would be bad…Part of what makes traditional martial arts so special is that there are so many variations and styles. But this can hurt competition Wushu and the chance for Wushu to become a world sport.”

Master Cai’s knowledge and understanding of Wushu also provides insight into Wushu’s direct application in fighting. His fighting experience attests to that. Firstly, he explains that forms and fighting are two different skill sets. “When you execute a straight punch in forms, you must also have a good bow stance. But in combat, you cannot wait to get into a good bow stance and then punch. You just punch. You have no time to set up perfect footwork.” He also said, “Even in my early days of training, when we spoke about routine practice and fighting training, both were clearly defined as separate entities.” However, he, as with other Wushu masters, also suggested how to make modern Wushu a legitimate modern martial arts system and not just a simple sport. “Some people know form. Some people only know San-Da (Chinese Free Combat). Surely, it is ideal if you know both, but from the competition point of view, you only choose one.”

As previously established, Master Cai was famous for winning public matches against Western fighters. Thus, he has legitimately proven himself outside of his Wushu system, something that is rare in the martial arts world, especially in the Wushu community. He is someone who was worthy of representing Wushu in a complete sense physically, martially and intellectually, not just in the sports and competition sense. There are very few modern Wushu athletes that could adequately represent Wushu in a complete sense, and they are not the Wushu champions and athletes that people normally would think of today. However, there are plenty of Wushu masters that could more than represent Wushu in all of these aspects, and Master Cai, who could be dubbed as “The Godfather of Wushu” was definitely on that list.


Kung Fu Magazine's article “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists”:

http://www.kungfumagazine.com/magazine/ ... rticle=625
Yes, Bruce used Master Cai' "Basic Chinese Wu Shu Exercise" as the blueprint for his first martial arts book - "Chinese Gung Fu." Bruce was greatly influenced by Master Cai.

Master Cai was very well-known in Asia's martial arts circle but not so much in the West. Another well-respected Kung Fu master with real fighting records.

R.I.P.,the big dragon.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 17th, 2016, 6:15 pm #6

Agreed. Bruce learned Northern Kung Fu in late 50s not in mid 60s as WJM's camp claimed.
Also, he didn't give up Wing Chun straight away after his fight with WJM in late 64. He returned to HK in 65 and tried to learn some more Wing Chun from Ip Man as well as other Kung Fu from Siu Hon San etc. Bruce only changed his style in late 66 or early 67.
Bruce is dead, people who tried to defamed him are easy but truth will always prevail ultimately.
Right, Lee became disillusioned with Kung Fu in late 1966 or early '67. See, he's still using tradional Kung Fu in the Green Hornet (1966-67). Lee was also seen displaying Kung Fu forms (Wing Chun, Choy Li Fut, Hung Gar etc.) in the '66 California beach photo sessions.
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September 18th, 2016, 2:13 am #7

The Big Dragon With The Magic Fist
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In 1943, at a young age of 15, he defeated famous Russian boxer, Marceau Love in open match in Shanghai and 3 years later, he beat world heavyweight champion "Black Lion" Luther, an African American in another open match in Shanghai again. He won both fights by knock outs. There were photos and reports on these fights in the old Shanghai newspaper. He was a real Chinese martial arts master who actually fought and won public matches against Western fighters. His nickname was “Big Dragon” and after he won the matches, the media called him “The Big Dragon with the Magic Fists.” This Big Dragon was Master Cai Longyun (aka Choy Loong-Wan), whose Chinese name literally means dragon flying over the clouds.

Influence over Bruce Lee
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Master Cai Longyun had contributed a lot to the martial arts world and influenced many martial arts practitioners globally. One of them was the legendary Bruce Lee. In Bruce’s first and only published martial arts book, “Chinese Gung Fu – The Philosophical Art of Self-Defense,” published in 1963, there were many leg training methods being borrowed from Master Cai’s Wushu (martial arts) book, called “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise.” There was almost an entire chapter on stretching and kicks, including illustrations, adapted from Master Cai’s own material. In addition, Bruce’s other scholarly materials, such as “Tao of Gung Fu,” which were published posthumously, there was even direct mentions of Hwa Kuen, and included pictures of Master Cai in his scrapbook. This proved that Master Cai’s knowledge, and by extension martial art’s foundation has far-reaching influences, and has validity in popular martial arts.

There were many illustrations drawn by Bruce in “Chinese Gung Fu” and many of them were based on Master Cai’s Wushu’s manuals. This showed Bruce had regards of Master Cai’s knowledge and skills, and many of the techniques seem practical as Bruce would cross reference and treated them as a guide in his Gung Fu’s exploration in the early 60s.

According to “Wen Hui Paper,” Master Cai said he felt proud that Bruce had brought honor to the Chinese martial arts and Kung Fu movies. Though someone ever told him that Bruce admired him and had kept Master Cai’s book “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise” under the pillow, Master Cai never dare to speak about it for fear of people thinking that he was boasting. It was until he saw someone from “Bruce Lee’s Research Society” who provided evidence to support the above claims that he finally believed it was true.

Bruce’s “Three un-landed Whirlwind Legs” In ’64 Karate Tournament/ ’73 ETD Scene
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Bruce was an avid reader and had more than 25,000 books in his personal library. Besides “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise,” he also collected Master Cai’s “Hwa Kuen.” Bruce self-learnt the techniques and exercises from these books. He also paid much attention to the training of his waist and hips, which allowed him to use his kicks flexibly just like his punch.

In his Long Beach Tournament Demo in 1964 and In the movie ETD, Bruce performed a special movement called, “Three un-landed Whirlwind Legs” --- the three consecutive steps which were completed above the ground followed by the Whirlwind kicks. These movements were actually originated from Master Cai’s “Hwa Kuen’s” Three un-landed steps but Bruce modified part of the movements to make it more fanciful. This clears the doubts that Bruce learnt this technique from WJM’s Bak Sil Lum footage. It was Hwa Kuen that he actually learnt it from Master Cai’s Kung Fu manual. In addition, Bruce revised and incorporated Kung Lik Kuen’s (he learnt from Siu Hon-Sung) jumping moves into this Whirlwind kick.

Tao of Kung Fu
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On June, 2010, Master Cai was requested to write forewords for Bruce’s Chinese edition “Tao of Gung Fu.” He wrote, “Though I and Bruce had never met each other but through the affinity of martial arts, we had borne a deep relationship….”

It was such a coincidence that both Master Cai and Bruce were born on the same month and same day, i.e. Master Cai’s birthday was on 27 Nov 1928 and Bruce’s birthday was on 27 Nov 1940. Both were born in the year of the dragon and the only difference was the 12 years gap between them. Master Cai was known as the “Big Dragon” while Bruce was the “Little Dragon.” “Maybe this is the special affinity between both of us,” Master Cai said.

Master Cai’s Comments on Bruce’s Kung Fu
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Master Cai spoke to some friends (note: probably Jesse Glover, Dan Lee who had visited mainland China before their passing) of Bruce and got to know that Bruce actually saw Master Cai as a learning model in martial arts. They said Bruce was an idol of many martial arts fans and Bruce himself looked upon Master Cai as his Kung Fu idol, probably due to his highly skilled martial arts and his feats over the Western fighters in the 1940s. They also told him that Bruce was very diligent in practicing Kung Fu and had studied many martial arts manuals. His two books “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise” and “First Routine of Hwa Kuen” were two favorites of Bruce who read it very often during the early 60s. As mentioned above, the first manual is used as a blueprint for Bruce’s first and only martial arts book, “Chinese Gung Fu – The philosophical Arts of Self-Defense.”

As to some rumor that said Bruce did not understand Chinese martial arts, Master Cai denied that. From what he understood, Bruce learnt at least 8 types of traditional Chinese martial arts. Master Cai said, “Bruce first learnt Wu Style’s Tai Chi from his father, then Wing Chun from Ip Man, followed by Yi Chuan from the student of Grandmaster Wong Hong-Joi. He also learnt Jit Kuen, Kung Lik Kuen and Bang Bo Kuen (Praying Mantis) from Siu Hon-Sung. Furthermore, he had picked up Hung Gar and Choy Li Fut from other masters. He also self-learnt “Lo Han Hsin Yi Chuan” from the video demo of a Shaolin monk. Of course, Bruce also self-learnt my famous Hwa Kuen.”

Master Cai continued, “In the early 60s, mainland China published a huge volumes of martial arts books (mostly northern styles). These quality martial arts books have very clear text and scientific systems as well as simple approaches. For those with very good martial arts foundation, they can simply self-learn these skills through the books.” Bruce bought a lot of these martial arts books from HK, and the bookstores in Chinatown of the U.S. and Canada etc. One thing to note is that, Bruce diligently trained his basics from Master Cai’s book, “The Basic Training of Wushu Exercise.” This was one of the reasons why Bruce could use his waist and legs very flexibly and could kick just liked his punch.

Bruce should be thankful to Master Cai for influencing his journey of Gung Fu learning in the early years. Master Cai had contributed a lot to the martial arts world with his many publications, teachings and therefore impacted many generations of martial arts practitioners, especially those in Chinese Wushu. Master Cai had passed away in Shanghai, at the age of 87, on December 19th, 2015. R.I.P.


Photos of Master Cai Longyun: https://postimg.org/image/d0xj5v3hz/

"At 15, he defeated famous Russian boxer, Marceau Love in open match in Shanghai and 3 years later, he beat world heavyweight champion "Black Lion" Luther, an African American..."

This is the real Kung Fu kid. The story can be made into a movie. It's much better than the fictionalized WJM, the Shaolin monk vs the mop head "Bruce Lee" (Philip Ng) in '64 Oakland.
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Joined: April 26th, 2016, 4:05 pm

September 21st, 2016, 9:39 pm #8

Who exactly was "Black Lion" Luther, what exactly was his pedigree? Was he actually any kind of champion? Was he actually any good? Of course the world heavyweight boxing champion at the time was a certain Joe Louis. Beating a much heavier opponent can be impressive, but some of these stories are, let's say, not entirely free of propaganda.
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Anonymous
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September 22nd, 2016, 12:52 am #9

This guy should be Luther Slugger White, an african American boxing champ. Master Cai's victory was seen over the old Shanghai newspapers. There were photos as well. Of course, Luther wasnt famous as Joe Louis as you only know.

http://www.thesweetscience.com/articles ... -believing
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Wai-Man Chan
Wai-Man Chan

September 22nd, 2016, 4:34 am #10

Who exactly was "Black Lion" Luther, what exactly was his pedigree? Was he actually any kind of champion? Was he actually any good? Of course the world heavyweight boxing champion at the time was a certain Joe Louis. Beating a much heavier opponent can be impressive, but some of these stories are, let's say, not entirely free of propaganda.
The second photo in the article is Black Lion Luther.

http://jiayoowushu.com/cai-longyun-wush ... ould-know/
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