Joined: January 17th, 2014, 1:19 am

October 5th, 2017, 7:57 pm #321

No, this is still very interesting to me, much more than seeing the forum flooded with spammers pimping books.
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Joined: January 17th, 2014, 1:19 am

October 5th, 2017, 9:24 pm #322

- Director Lo Wei: "The hero of The Big Boss is an energetic young man. When such a man prepares to kill the villain at any cost, he naturally will want to give vent to his desire. So, he goes to the whorehouse and makes love to a prostitute."

What is the source of this quote, specifically? Is it from an interview on a TV show or magazine? Unfortunately the article neglects to clarify the origin of Lo Wei's quote, so I just wanna know where it comes from. If anyone can tell me, that would be great.
"Lonesome Space" posted this elsewhere.

https://i.imgur.com/P0YYipY.jpg


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Joined: November 12th, 2015, 12:52 am

October 5th, 2017, 11:57 pm #323

No, this is still very interesting to me, much more than seeing the forum flooded with spammers pimping books.
Very well, I'll take your word for it. And yes, I agree the drama over book pimping is irritating and doesn't bring the forum anywhere.
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Herolung
Herolung

October 15th, 2017, 5:58 am #324

I did read before about how Chinese expatriates in a foreign land generally treat each other as close siblings, regardless of whether they are tied by blood or not. In fact, I've been told this was the very reason why the entire "cousin and family" aspect in Big Boss is present, even thought I've also been made aware that such plot device did not exist in the Mandarin/Cantonese versions.
This is generally true in most Asian / Pacific Islander cultures. Even speaking generally, a younger person will address a elder family friend as 'uncle' or 'auntie' or 'elder brother' etc. And when the families are actually close, the elders will definitely be treated as true aunts and uncles. Commenting on TBB, it's also possible that the family is actually either distant relatives or maybe relatives-by-marriage (example, a daughter of one husband/wife has a son, who then marries a girl. And then that girl's sister marries a guy; that guy has a second cousin and then he's considered an 'uncle' to the original family. And his entire family is then considered distant relatives. As a personal example, I was born in the Philippines, and came to US three years of age. I have an 'uncle' but the lineage is so convoluted it's still not clear where he fits it! But my real aunts and uncles treat him as blood, so he's always been a 'blood uncle' (and a favorite one btw) to me.
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Joined: November 12th, 2015, 12:52 am

October 15th, 2017, 7:11 am #325

Thank you very much for the input and clarification. The Asian/Pacific lands certainly have an unique take on interpersonal familiar relationships. Any personal anecdotes in regards to the fabric of intimate relationships in those same lands? I'd like to hear more.
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Joined: October 17th, 2017, 5:36 am

October 17th, 2017, 6:05 am #326

While I love the American lifestyle, a part of me also appreciates the fact where close family friends are considered as real blood. I would hope that U.S. in general would have more of these close family ties. Of course, you can see this in other cultures as well, the Italians for example. One of my favorite people is an Italian lady and I call her my aunt, and she calls me her caviliere (may misspell that, it means 'knight') although I also like 'commendatore' which is the title of Enzo Ferrari, so that's in a fast class! She also brought me into her family, so there's another extended family for me. Btw, my best of best friends, who was of German-Irish descent (he passed away at young age), really a brother to me, oddly had an Asian viewpoint it seemed to his family. They were very close; when he said goodnight to his dad, he would kiss him on the top of the head, ditto his mom. His mom and dad called me son number four (they had three sons), and I called them Mom and Dad #2. Anyway, back to Bruce .... I can well understand that growing up in Hong Kong with such a large family, and extended family that it must have been a lot of fun. A great book is a bio called Golden Boy (*I think there may be two titles, but this is one of them). It's about an British kid who goes to live in Hong Kong around the time Bruce was there, and he grew up in Kowloon; if you read it you can read about the general neighborhood where Bruce grew up. His dad was a real snob, but his mom embraced the Chinese ways, and they both learned to speak Cantonese. I think that BL was around seven years older than this British boy, but I'm sure that they crossed paths in the streets. The book really gives the atmosphere of Hong Kong, and you can really see in your mind's eye Bruce Lee walking those streets. Hong Kong in those days must have been heaven for a kid. (It's still a great place.)
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Joined: October 17th, 2017, 5:36 am

October 17th, 2017, 6:06 am #327

Thank you very much for the input and clarification. The Asian/Pacific lands certainly have an unique take on interpersonal familiar relationships. Any personal anecdotes in regards to the fabric of intimate relationships in those same lands? I'd like to hear more.
While I love the American lifestyle, a part of me also appreciates the fact where close family friends are considered as real blood. I would hope that U.S. in general would have more of these close family ties. Of course, you can see this in other cultures as well, the Italians for example. One of my favorite people is an Italian lady and I call her my aunt, and she calls me her caviliere (may misspell that, it means 'knight') although I also like 'commendatore' which is the title of Enzo Ferrari, so that's in a fast class! She also brought me into her family, so there's another extended family for me. Btw, my best of best friends, who was of German-Irish descent (he passed away at young age), really a brother to me, oddly had an Asian viewpoint it seemed to his family. They were very close; when he said goodnight to his dad, he would kiss him on the top of the head, ditto his mom. His mom and dad called me son number four (they had three sons), and I called them Mom and Dad #2. Anyway, back to Bruce .... I can well understand that growing up in Hong Kong with such a large family, and extended family that it must have been a lot of fun. A great book is a bio called Golden Boy (*I think there may be two titles, but this is one of them). It's about an British kid who goes to live in Hong Kong around the time Bruce was there, and he grew up in Kowloon; if you read it you can read about the general neighborhood where Bruce grew up. His dad was a real snob, but his mom embraced the Chinese ways, and they both learned to speak Cantonese. I think that BL was around seven years older than this British boy, but I'm sure that they crossed paths in the streets. The book really gives the atmosphere of Hong Kong, and you can really see in your mind's eye Bruce Lee walking those streets. Hong Kong in those days must have been heaven for a kid. (It's still a great place.)
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Joined: January 17th, 2014, 1:19 am

October 19th, 2017, 12:46 am #328

This is generally true in most Asian / Pacific Islander cultures. Even speaking generally, a younger person will address a elder family friend as 'uncle' or 'auntie' or 'elder brother' etc. And when the families are actually close, the elders will definitely be treated as true aunts and uncles. Commenting on TBB, it's also possible that the family is actually either distant relatives or maybe relatives-by-marriage (example, a daughter of one husband/wife has a son, who then marries a girl. And then that girl's sister marries a guy; that guy has a second cousin and then he's considered an 'uncle' to the original family. And his entire family is then considered distant relatives. As a personal example, I was born in the Philippines, and came to US three years of age. I have an 'uncle' but the lineage is so convoluted it's still not clear where he fits it! But my real aunts and uncles treat him as blood, so he's always been a 'blood uncle' (and a favorite one btw) to me.
Wasn't Wu Ngan basically like an adoptive brother Bruce Lee? What a shame, a pity, he was, for all intents and purposes, silent about all things Bruce Lee, for decades. A disservice quite frankly.
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Joined: November 28th, 2017, 12:42 am

November 28th, 2017, 1:13 am #329

Eh, I think the second prozzie is rather pretty, but hey, to each their own I suppose. LOL

http://p7.storage.canalblog.com/77/88/3 ... 847491.jpg

Anyway, Cheng Chao-An deemed her worthy of being pollinated with his seed, so to speak. I don't doubt that their encounter was also complemented by a degree of mutual emotional involvement (i.e. kissing and such).
what is this pic? ive never seen it before.
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Joined: November 12th, 2015, 12:52 am

November 28th, 2017, 2:35 am #330

Considering the "high" quality I would assume it's from a long-extinct blog.
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