Joined: August 26th, 2018, 8:39 pm

August 26th, 2018, 9:05 pm #111

Hi Matthew. Congratulations on the great work you did. I asked myself the following question: During the last three years Bruce Lee lived in Hong Kong, do you know how he directed his training and his research?
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Joined: June 18th, 2018, 1:17 am

August 26th, 2018, 11:18 pm #112

[quote="albrado"]
Hi Matthew. Congratulations on the great work you did. I asked myself the following question: During the last three years Bruce Lee lived in Hong Kong, do you know how he directed his training and his research?
[/quote]

Hey Albrado,
You mean his training and research into martial arts, correct? His primary focus was his movie career and much of his training was on techniques intended film choreography, like high kicks. He was planning to write an article about Jeet Kune Do. There are some audio tapes of him discussing the superiority of JKD. Of course, he also continued to train vigorously. His Hong Kong mansion was filled with training equipment. We know he particularly spent a lot of time on finger jabs. But I'm not aware of anything else that was different about his training in his last 3 years than it was previously in Hollywood. Maybe someone else on this forum knows this aspect of his life better than I do.
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Joined: August 26th, 2018, 8:39 pm

August 27th, 2018, 6:55 am #113

Thanks Matthew. Keep up the great work !
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Joined: July 5th, 2018, 10:03 pm

September 11th, 2018, 3:21 pm #114

MP what do you think would take the BL to believe that Steven McQueen would take acting on the weird Silent Flute?
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Joined: June 18th, 2018, 1:17 am

September 12th, 2018, 2:20 pm #115

[quote="Raphael Lee"]
MP what do you think would take the BL to believe that Steven McQueen would take acting on the weird Silent Flute?
[/quote]

An excellent question. Based on my research, Bruce was very enthusiastic about doing a martial arts movie with Steve McQueen. He kept pitching the idea to McQueen when they trained together. I believe McQueen wasn't very interested but didn't want to be rude to Bruce, who was his martial arts instructor, so he pretended to be interested. Bruce was so excited (and desperate) that he missed the signals McQueen was giving him.
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 9:14 pm

September 12th, 2018, 6:17 pm #116

Matthew Polly, Everyone who has been on this forum any length of time can attest my personal dislike for Raymond Chow. My feelings have actually grown stronger with disdain for the individual. What, if anything, gave you confidence in recounts of events, told to you about July 20th, 1973, by Raymond Chow, that he was NOT being disingenuous? Especially that information published in your book, strikingly differs from original statements. I guess I'm asking YOUR personal opinions here.
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Joined: June 18th, 2018, 1:17 am

September 12th, 2018, 7:43 pm #117

Raymond Chow stuck me as a typical Chinese movie producer, which is to say much of what he told me were lies. But here is the thing about liars. Some are pathological, like Trump, and some are strategic. My impression of Chow is he only lies when it was in his self-interest. So I tend to trust the things he said that he had no reason to lie about--for example, that Bruce performed scenes from Game of Death before getting dizzy and getting a headache. (A) It is the kind of thing Bruce would do and (B) Why would Raymond make it up? On the other hand, I didn't believe him (and I pointed this out in the book) when he told me that he went to Bruce's house to work on the screenplay for Game of Death. (A) Bruce didn't work on his scripts with Raymond and (B) This was the story Raymond told right after Lee's death to cover up the affair with Betty, so he has ever reason to stick to his original story.

If you have any questions about specific quotes, feel free to ask me. Writing about Lee's last day was the hardest part, because Linda, Raymond, and Betty's versions of it are a mix of truths and lies that have shifted over time. I did my best to sort them out, but it was not easy and I wouldn't be surprised if I made some mistakes.
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Joined: December 19th, 2017, 9:38 pm

September 12th, 2018, 9:51 pm #118

I'd have to say that Linda knows more-or-less exactly why BL died, that she was worried about his health and that she was in a very real sense complicit (though perhaps forced) in doing various things which were contributory to his death.

He said to a few people that he didn't know how long he could keep it up and since he was very close to Linda, she would know specifically why.

Since she is so embedded in his story as an immutable legend, we will never get the truth from her. 

What parts of her story, Mr P. did you suspect were untruths?
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Joined: September 12th, 2011, 9:14 pm

September 13th, 2018, 4:27 pm #119

[quote="matthewpolly"]
Raymond Chow stuck me as a typical Chinese movie producer, which is to say much of what he told me were lies. But here is the thing about liars. Some are pathological, like Trump, and some are strategic. My impression of Chow is he only lies when it was in his self-interest. So I tend to trust the things he said that he had no reason to lie about--for example, that Bruce performed scenes from Game of Death before getting dizzy and getting a headache. (A) It is the kind of thing Bruce would do and (B) Why would Raymond make it up? On the other hand, I didn't believe him (and I pointed this out in the book) when he told me that he went to Bruce's house to work on the screenplay for Game of Death. (A) Bruce didn't work on his scripts with Raymond and (B) This was the story Raymond told right after Lee's death to cover up the affair with Betty, so he has ever reason to stick to his original story.

If you have any questions about specific quotes, feel free to ask me. Writing about Lee's last day was the hardest part, because Linda, Raymond, and Betty's versions of it are a mix of truths and lies that have shifted over time. I did my best to sort them out, but it was not easy and I wouldn't be surprised if I made some mistakes.
[/quote]

Thank you for your quick response. I've read your book twice already and find it to be a new favorite alongside Thomas Hauser's Life and Times of Muhammed Ali.
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Joined: June 18th, 2018, 1:17 am

September 14th, 2018, 7:24 pm #120

Thank you for your quick response. I've read your book twice already and find it to be a new favorite alongside Thomas Hauser's Life and Times of Muhammed Ali.
[/quote]

So glad to hear that. It makes my day. Thanks.
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